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Scene 1 -  Riggan's Meditation
F O R Y O U R C O N S I D E R A T I O N




BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Written by
Alejandro G. Iñárritu
Nicolás Giacobone
Alexander Dinelaris, Jr.
Armando Bo
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Written by
Alejandro G. Iñárritu
Nicolás Giacobone
Alexander Dinelaris, Jr.
Armando Bo



© 2013 DINOSAUR OUT, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PORTION OF THIS SCRIPT MAY BE
PERFORMED, PUBLISHED, REPRODUCED, SOLD OR DISTRIBUTED BY ANY MEANS, OR QUOTED OR
PUBLISHED IN ANY MEDIUM, INCLUDING ANY WEB SITE, WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT
OF DINOSAUR OUT, INC. DISPOSAL OF THIS SCRIPT COPY DOES NOT ALTER ANY OF THE
RESTRICTIONS SET FORTH ABOVE.
1 BLACK 1

We hear a clock ticking.

FADE IN:

1 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - DAY 1
Close on the brilliant colors of a middle eastern rug, the
center of what seems to be a makeshift “meditation” space.

We slowly tilt up to discover the back of Riggan Thomson (55).
He is in the proper ‘Lotus’ position, dressed only in tight
white briefs and he appears to be meditating deeply. And if all
this seems a little odd, it becomes all the more so when you
notice that he is levitating almost two feet above the floor.
His breath is calm and measured... in and out... in and out.

MAN (V.O.)
How did we end up here?
(Beat.)
This place is a fucking dump.

We begin to slowly move toward Riggan's back while his measure
breathing continues. We see a clock on the wall, ticking.

MAN (V.O.)
Smells like balls.

A slight twitch in Riggan's neck.

MAN (V.O.)
We don't belong in this shithole.

A Skype call shatters the silence. Close on his back, we follow
Riggan as he walks over to the computer and answers the call.
On the computer screen appears Sam (21), in a pair of Levi's
and a Led Zeppelin T-shirt. She has simple and striking good
looks, with an edge in her voice and behind her eyes. She
stands in a Korean Deli among the flowers, talking to Riggan
through her iPhone.

1A 1A

The Korean Store owner (50) stands in the background screaming
at her the whole time.

RIGGAN
Sam, I can't--



(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 2.

SAM
Dad? What kind of--
(Turning to Korean.)
SHUT UP!!!
(Back to screen.)
What kind of flowers did you say you
wanted?

RIGGAN
Alchemillas. Or something soothing that
smells nice. Listen I can’t--
SAM
It all smells like fucking Kimchi!

RIGGAN
Then whatever looks nice. Anything but
roses. No roses.

KOREAN
Flowers don't need you touch! They need you
buy!!!

SAM
(Close into the screen.)
I hate this job.

And the Skype call is over. Riggan closes the laptop and leans
forward trying to regain his calm. His reflection appears in
the mirror, and for the first time we see his face. He has a
dark goatee and his hair looks strangely abundant. There is a
piece of paper on the mirror with the handwritten phrase “A
thing is a thing, not what it is said of that thing.”

ANNIE ON SPEAKERS
Riggan, they’re starting scene
five. We need you on stage.

RIGGAN
Shit...
Riggan throws on a sweater and stumbles into his slacks. He
hurries out...

2 INT. HALLWAYS - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 2

...through the narrow corridors of the theater. There is a lot
of activity as various workers and stage hands appear and
disappear carrying equipment and scenery. As Riggan descends the
stairs, a Stage Hand· passes by in the opposite direction.

STAGE HAND·
Mr. Thomson.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 3.

RIGGAN
Steve.

STAGE HAND·
It’s Daniel.

RIGGAN
(Already passed.)
Okay.

Riggan continues on until he arrives backstage. He runs into
Jake (42) his producer and friend.

JAKE
How’s it going, buddy.

RIGGAN
Great. It’d be even better if I
could get Ralph to stop acting like
he’s in an educational video for
syphilis...
The camera moves off of them and onto...
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary Riggan Thomson, a middle-aged actor, is seen meditating in his dressing room before a performance. He receives a Skype call from his daughter, Sam, who works at a Korean Deli. They have a brief conversation about flowers. Riggan then rushes to the stage for scene five of the play. On his way, he complains about another actor and meets his producer, Jake.
Strengths
  • Witty dialogue
  • Unique concepts
  • Establishing character relationships
Weaknesses
  • Low emotional impact
  • Minimal character change

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively introduces the main character, establishes his relationship with his daughter, and sets up the conflict with another actor. The dialogue is witty and humorous, adding entertainment value to the scene.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of a levitating meditation and a Skype call in a theater is unique and intriguing. It adds an element of surrealism to the scene.

Plot: 7

The plot of the scene revolves around Riggan preparing for his performance and dealing with personal and professional issues. It sets up the conflicts and tensions that will drive the story forward.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the setting of a theater and the struggles of an actor are familiar, the levitating protagonist adds a unique and unexpected element. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 8

The characters are well-defined and their personalities shine through the dialogue. Riggan is shown as a slightly eccentric but relatable protagonist, and Sam is portrayed as a strong-willed and sassy young woman.

Character Changes: 4

There is minimal character change in the scene, as it primarily serves to establish the characters and their relationships. However, Riggan's frustration with the other actor hints at potential character growth.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to regain his calm and focus before going on stage. This reflects his deeper need for validation and success as an actor.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to go on stage and perform scene five. This reflects the immediate circumstances and challenges he is facing as an actor in a theater production.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 6

The conflict in the scene is relatively low, with minor tensions between Riggan and the Korean Store owner, as well as Riggan's frustration with another actor. However, it sets up the potential for higher conflicts in the future.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is moderate. The protagonist faces challenges and obstacles in the form of Ralph's behavior and the chaotic theater environment.

High Stakes: 5

The stakes in the scene are relatively low, with the focus on personal and professional frustrations. However, the success of Riggan's performance and his relationship with his daughter are at stake.

Story Forward: 7

The scene moves the story forward by introducing the main character, establishing conflicts, and setting up the upcoming performance. It provides necessary exposition and sets the stage for future developments.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because of the levitating protagonist and the unexpected humor in the dialogue. The audience doesn't know how the situation will unfold.

Philosophical Conflict: 0

There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 5

The emotional impact of the scene is relatively low, with a focus on humor and light-heartedness. However, there is a hint of underlying emotional tension between Riggan and his daughter.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue is sharp, witty, and entertaining. It reveals the characters' personalities and establishes their relationships.

Engagement: 8

This scene is engaging because it introduces an intriguing and unexpected situation with the levitating protagonist. The witty dialogue and fast-paced action keep the audience interested.

Pacing: 9

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by creating a sense of urgency and excitement. The fast-paced action and quick dialogue keep the scene moving forward.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes scene headings, character names, and dialogue in the correct format.

Structure: 9

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It starts with a description of the setting, introduces the protagonist, and sets up the conflict and goals.


Critique
  • The scene starts with a clock ticking, which creates a sense of urgency and sets the tone for the rest of the scene. However, the clock is not mentioned again, and it feels like a missed opportunity to use it to build tension.
  • The introduction of Riggan's levitation is intriguing, but it is not explained or explored further in this scene. It feels like a random detail that doesn't serve a purpose.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Sam feels forced and unnatural. It's unclear why they are arguing about flowers, and the Korean Deli owner's constant yelling in the background is distracting.
  • The interaction between Riggan and the Stage Hand is confusing and doesn't add anything to the scene.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Jake is more natural and helps establish their relationship, but the line about Ralph acting like he's in an educational video for syphilis feels out of place and jarring.
  • Overall, the scene lacks a clear conflict or purpose. It feels like a series of random events that don't add up to anything significant.
  • The visual elements, such as the clock and the piece of paper on the mirror, feel underutilized and could be used to add more depth and meaning to the scene.
Suggestions
  • Consider using the levitation as a metaphor or symbol for Riggan's state of mind or the themes of the screenplay.
  • Simplify the dialogue between Riggan and Sam and make their conflict more clear and meaningful.
  • Cut the interaction with the Stage Hand and focus on the more important relationships in the scene.
  • Reconsider the line about Ralph and find a more natural way to establish the conflict between Riggan and his co-star.
  • Add a clear goal or conflict for Riggan to overcome in this scene, such as stage fright or a disagreement with Jake.
  • Use the visual elements to add more depth and meaning to the scene, such as having the piece of paper on the mirror relate to Riggan's character arc.



Scene 2 -  Love and Chaos
3 INT. STAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 3
...the stage. Suddenly we are in the midst of an Americana style
kitchen.

Around the kitchen table sit Lesley (35), plain and no nonsense,
her simple hairstyle and makeup can't hide how attractive she
is. Laura (35), dark, exotic, the kind of woman who makes every
person she meets feel like she's seducing them. And Ralph (40),
slightly handsome, slightly balding, slightly invisible.

A half empty bottle of gin on the table, they drink from
highball glasses as they chat...

LESLEY
He loved me.

RALPH
Yeah. He loved her so much he tried
to kill her.

LAURA
He tried to kill you?

LESLEY
No. (A beat.) Okay, well, he did
beat me up one night. He dragged me
around the living room by my
ankles, yelling "I love you, I love
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 4.
LESLEY (CONT'D)
you, bitch." What do you do with a
love like that?

RALPH
How is that-- That is not love and you know
it. Why do you insist on calling it--

LESLEY
You can say what you want, but I know what
it was.
RALPH
What about you, Nick? Does that sound like
love to you?

Riggan arrives at the table and sits.

RIGGAN
Sorry I’m late.
(Beat. In character.)
I'm the wrong person to ask. I didn't
know the man. I've only heard his name
mentioned in passing. You'd have to
know the particulars. But I think what
you're saying is that love is absolute.

RALPH
Yeah. The kind of love I'm talking about
is... The kind of love I'm talking about,
you don't try and kill people.

LESLEY
(Sadly.)
It was love, Mel. To Eddie, it was. I don't
care what anybody says. He was ready to die
for it.

RALPH
Ask her what he did after she left him.

LESLEY
He shot himself in the mouth. But he
screwed that up, too. Poor Ed.

RALPH
Poor Ed, my ass. The guy was dangerous.

LAURA
How'd he screw it up if he shot himself in
the mouth?

RALPH
(By the numbers.)
He used to carry this twenty-two. We lived
like fugitives those days. I never knew--
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 5.

RIGGAN
(Breaking character to direct.
Exasperated.)
Okay. Fugitives are on the run, Ralph. How
many times do I have to-- Fugitives are
scared. Give me more of that.

Ralph nods. He takes a breath and dives in once again...

RALPH
(The same but louder.)
We lived like fugitives those days...

Extremely frustrated, Riggan stares out into the auditorium.
From his POV we see Jake who is now sitting in the third row.
His head buried in his hands, tortured by Ralph’s performance.
Riggan turns back to Ralph.

RALPH (CONT'D)
...I never knew if he was going to come out
of the bushes or from behind a car and just
start shooting.

Riggan watches Ralph act and sees his whole production headed
down the drain. Ralph is just that bad.

RALPH (CONT’D)
The man was crazy. He was capable of
anything.

The actors all wait for a cue from Riggan, who is now staring
up into the lights above the stage. Laura finally picks up
Riggan’s cue.

LAURA
Christ. What a nightmare...

RALPH
He used to call me at the hospital and
say...
(Over the top.)
"Son of a bitch. Your days are numbered."

Silence. Ralph looks over to Riggan.

RALPH (CONT'D)
Too much? Little bit? I just wanted to give
you a range, so you could--

And with that a light comes barreling down from it's perch and
crashes into Ralph's head, making him hit the floor like a rag
doll. Silence.

LAURA
Holy shit.
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 6.

Lesley and Annie (35), the Stage Manager, run over to Ralph
who is out cold. Not knowing what to do, they stare at him.

LESLEY
Is he breathing?

Jake runs toward the stage.

JAKE
Someone call 911!
Riggan slowly backs away from the chaos.

LAURA
Is that blood coming out of his
ear?

JAKE
(To Riggan.)
Where are you going?
LESLEY
Okay, he’s breathing. What did he
have for lunch?

LAURA
Did anyone call for help?

ANNIE
(Clapping.)
Wake up! Wake up!

Two crew members try to help Ralph.

CREW MEMBER
Grab his legs. I got the top.

JAKE
Don't move him! Wait for the ambulance.
(Calling out.)
For the love of God! I could get a black
audience in this theater faster than a
doctor!

Riggan heads off the stage, and Jake chases after him. We
follow them as...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In the midst of a play rehearsal, Riggan Thomson witnesses a disastrous performance by Ralph, one of the actors. As chaos ensues, Riggan becomes increasingly frustrated and realizes that his production is in jeopardy.
Strengths
  • Intense and dramatic dialogue
  • Effective portrayal of emotions and conflicts
  • Engaging exploration of dysfunctional love
Weaknesses
  • Some elements could be further developed to enhance the impact
  • Character changes could be more pronounced

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively captures the intensity and frustration of the characters, and the dialogue is engaging. However, there are some moments that could be improved to enhance the overall impact.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of exploring dysfunctional love and the chaos within a theater production is interesting and engaging. However, there are some elements that could be further developed to enhance the concept.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the disastrous performance of Ralph and the potential consequences for the production. It effectively creates tension and conflict.

Originality: 7

This scene demonstrates a level of originality through its exploration of the concept of love and the conflicting perspectives on it. The characters' actions and dialogue feel authentic and provide fresh insights into the complexities of human relationships.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters are well-developed and their emotions and conflicts are portrayed effectively. Their interactions and dialogue drive the scene.

Character Changes: 7

While there are some hints of character changes, such as Riggan's increasing frustration and realization of the production's jeopardy, it could be further developed to have a stronger impact.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to understand and come to terms with the concept of love. They are grappling with the idea of what love truly means and whether the actions of a person who claims to love someone can be justified.

External Goal: 6

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is not explicitly stated, but it can be inferred that they are trying to navigate the conversation and maintain control over the situation.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict between the characters is intense and drives the scene forward. The chaos and tension within the theater production add to the conflict.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is strong, as the characters have conflicting beliefs and engage in heated arguments. The audience is unsure of how the conflict will be resolved and is kept on edge.

High Stakes: 8

The stakes are high as the disastrous performance threatens the success of the production and the reputation of the characters involved. The chaos and tension add to the sense of high stakes.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by highlighting the potential consequences for the production and Riggan's increasing frustration. It sets up further conflicts and challenges for the characters.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it challenges the audience's expectations of what love should be. The conflicting perspectives on love and the unexpected turn of events with Ralph being hit by a light add an element of surprise to the scene.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the differing perspectives on love. Lesley believes that the abusive actions of her partner were a form of love, while Ralph and Riggan argue that true love does not involve violence or harm. This conflict challenges Lesley's beliefs and forces her to question her understanding of love.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 8

The scene evokes a range of emotions, including sadness, frustration, and tension. The intense performances and dialogue contribute to the emotional impact.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue is intense, dramatic, and reveals the complex emotions and relationships between the characters. It effectively drives the scene forward.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because it presents a thought-provoking philosophical conflict and creates tension through the characters' dialogue and actions. The audience is drawn into the emotional struggles of the characters and is eager to see how the conflict will be resolved.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing for moments of tension and reflection. The dialogue exchanges are well-paced, giving the audience time to absorb the emotions and ideas being presented.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 8

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

Structure: 9

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, introduces the characters, and progresses through a series of dialogue exchanges that build tension and reveal the philosophical conflict.


Critique
  • The scene lacks clear direction and purpose. It is unclear why the audience is watching this conversation about love and how it relates to the play Riggan is in.
  • The dialogue feels forced and unnatural, particularly in the way the characters talk about love. It is difficult to believe that these characters would have this conversation in this way.
  • The characters are not well-developed and their interactions feel superficial. It is unclear why they are drinking gin and having this conversation in the first place.
  • The visual elements of the scene are not well-described, making it difficult for the reader to imagine the setting and actions.
  • The conflict that arises with Ralph's bad acting feels contrived and does not add to the overall plot or character development.
  • The scene ends abruptly and without resolution, leaving the reader unsure of what the purpose of the scene was in the first place.
Suggestions
  • Clarify the purpose of the scene and how it relates to the overall plot and character development.
  • Develop the characters more fully and make their interactions feel more natural and believable.
  • Provide more detail about the setting and actions to help the reader imagine the scene more vividly.
  • Consider removing the conflict with Ralph's bad acting or finding a way to make it more meaningful to the overall story.
  • Provide a clearer resolution to the scene to give it a sense of closure and purpose.



Scene 3 -  Theatrical Chaos
4 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 4

...they walk through the corridor.

JAKE
Where are you going? We’ll have the
understudy ready to rehearse in five--
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 7.

RIGGAN
Forget the understudy. We have to postpone
the preview.

JAKE
What are you-- It’s a full house. We would
have to refund all the--

RIGGAN
Then do it.
A crew member· passes in the opposite direction.

CREW MEMBER·
How’s Ralph?

RIGGAN
He’ll be fine.

JAKE
Wait. Wait. Fuck. Wait.
RIGGAN
Listen to me. It was going to be a
disaster. That guy’s the worst actor I've
ever seen. The blood coming out of his ear
was the most honest thing he's done so far.

JAKE
He's not that bad.

Riggan stops in his tracks and stares at Jake.

JAKE (CONT'D)
Okay, he's fucking horrible. But--

Riggan starts walking again.

JAKE (CONT’D)
You have the press in your dressing
room in a few hours. How are we--
RIGGAN
I'll make something up.

Two Technicians· hurry up in the opposite direction.

RIGGAN (CONT’D)
Jake. This happened for a reason. It wasn't
an accident.

JAKE
What do you mean?


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 8.

RIGGAN
I-- (A beat.) I made it happen.

JAKE
Oh. Okay.
(Beat.)
Are you drunk?

RIGGAN
Find me an actor. A good actor.
Philip Seymour Hoffman...
JAKE
He’s doing the third Hunger Games.

RIGGAN
Michael Fassbender?

JAKE
Doing the prequel to the X-Men
prequel.
They arrive at Riggan's dressing room.

RIGGAN
What’s his name? Jeremy Renner...

JAKE
Who?

RIGGAN
The... the Hurt Locker guy.

JAKE
Yeah. He’s an Avenger.

RIGGAN
(With disgust.)
Fuck. They put him in a cape, too?
(A beat.) Look, I don’t care. Find
me someone.
Riggan enters...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In the midst of a play rehearsal, Riggan Thomson witnesses a disastrous performance by Ralph, one of the actors. As chaos ensues, Riggan becomes increasingly frustrated and realizes that his production is in jeopardy.
Strengths
  • Effective portrayal of frustration and chaos
  • Strong conflict and tension
Weaknesses
  • Dialogue could be more nuanced and complex

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively conveys the frustration and chaos faced by Riggan, creating tension and anticipation for the future of the production.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of a struggling actor facing challenges in a theater production is engaging and relatable.

Plot: 9

The plot of the scene revolves around the disastrous performance and its impact on Riggan and the production, creating a sense of urgency and conflict.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a struggling theater production and the need to find a replacement actor is a familiar trope, the specific dialogue and character interactions bring a fresh and humorous approach to the scenario. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 8

The characters in the scene, particularly Riggan and Jake, are well-developed and their frustrations and motivations are clearly portrayed.

Character Changes: 7

Riggan experiences a shift in his perspective and determination as he realizes the challenges he faces.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to find a solution to the problem of the understudy's performance. This reflects his desire for the play to be successful and his fear of failure.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to postpone the preview of the play. This reflects the immediate challenge of dealing with the understudy's poor performance and the potential consequences of refunding tickets.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict in the scene is high, with Riggan realizing the jeopardy of his production and facing challenges in finding a replacement actor.

Opposition: 8

The opposition in this scene is strong as the protagonist faces challenges and obstacles in finding a replacement actor and dealing with the consequences of postponing the preview. The audience is unsure of how the situation will be resolved.

High Stakes: 9

The stakes are high as the success of the production and Riggan's career are at risk.

Story Forward: 9

The scene significantly moves the story forward by introducing a major obstacle and raising the stakes for the protagonist.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because the audience doesn't know how the protagonist will solve the problem of finding a replacement actor. The dialogue and the characters' reactions add an element of surprise.

Philosophical Conflict: 0

There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 8

The scene evokes a strong emotional response, particularly frustration and anticipation.

Dialogue: 7

The dialogue effectively conveys the frustration and urgency of the situation, but could benefit from more depth and complexity.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because it presents a problem and creates a sense of urgency. The witty dialogue and the characters' reactions keep the audience interested in the outcome.

Pacing: 9

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by maintaining a sense of urgency and keeping the dialogue and actions moving at a fast pace. This creates tension and holds the audience's attention.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses standard scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with an establishing shot and then focuses on the dialogue between the characters. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


Critique
  • The dialogue in this scene feels a bit on-the-nose and exposition-heavy. It might benefit from more subtext and nuance.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Jake could be heightened by giving them more opposing goals or desires.
  • The visual elements in this scene are minimal and could be enhanced to create a more dynamic and engaging scene.
  • The emotional tone of the scene could be more varied and complex, rather than just tense and urgent throughout.
  • The conversation between Riggan and Jake could benefit from more active listening and reacting, rather than just delivering lines back and forth.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding more physical action or movement to the scene to make it more visually interesting.
  • Try to find ways to reveal character and backstory through subtext and non-verbal cues, rather than just having characters state their thoughts and feelings.
  • Experiment with different emotional tones throughout the scene to create more variety and depth.
  • Consider adding more conflict or tension to the scene by giving Riggan and Jake more opposing goals or desires.
  • Try to make the dialogue more natural and conversational, with more active listening and reacting between the characters.



Scene 4 -  Chaos and Frustration
5 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 5

...his dressing room and tries to shut the door. Jake, still in
the corridor, stops it with his foot.

JAKE
(Sticking his head in.)
Ralph'll sue us. He'll sue us. And he's got
a case.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 9.

Riggan releases the door.

RIGGAN
Then make him go away.

JAKE
How do you suggest I do that?

RIGGAN
You're my lawyer, my producer and
my oldest friend. We are going to
make this work. Now just get out
there and do what you were born to
do.

JAKE
What's that?

RIGGAN
I have no idea. But I have faith.
Now go away from me.
JAKE
Do you think we should--

Riggan slams the door shut on Jake. A beat. On a television, a
segment of E! News. A busty blond, with an exaggerated smile,
hosts.

BLOND WOMAN
...and when we come back, an exclusive
interview with Robert Downey Jr., who tells
us about the billion-dollar Iron Man
franchise. The talented actor invited us
onto the set of Iron Man 3...

Riggan slams the tv off, his mind racing. He sits on a chair.

MAN (V.O.)
That clown doesn’t have half your talent
and he’s making a fortune in that Tin Man
get up.

Riggan stares into the mirror, in the reflection he catches
sight of a poster from a movie called "Birdman 3". The
superhero, Birdman (a younger Riggan in a bird costume), wings
widely spread, stares directly back at him. A hand written
note on the top of the poster reads: "Thomson, break a wing!
From the boys at Local 1." Riggan tries to calm himself with a
mantra...

RIGGAN
"Breathing in, I embrace my anger.
Breathing out, I smile to it."

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 10.

BIRDMAN (V.O.)
Embrace it. Kiss it. Turn it around and
fuck it in the--

A knock on the door behind him.

RIGGAN
Not now!

Laura opens the door and sticks her head in.
LAURA
Can I come in?

RIGGAN
No.

LAURA
Okay. Two words. Shia La Beouf.

RIGGAN
That's three words.

LAURA
It's two.

RIGGAN
Get out.

LAURA
I love you.

She closes the door. Riggan tries to calm himself down, but
Laura opens the door again.

LAURA (CONT'D)
I take it we’re not going to dinner
anymore?

RIGGAN
I don’t have an actor.
LAURA
I don’t have a life.

RIGGAN
Laura...

LAURA
Fine. Whatever.
(Goes to leave but stops.)
You remember at Joan's when you
asked me to come do a Broadway play
with you? You said it would be
fun...
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 11.

RIGGAN
Go away.

LAURA
So far? No fun.

Riggan closes the door and looks at the Birdman poster.

BIRDMAN (V.O.)
Fun? You know what would be fun? Getting
the fuck out of here before we humiliate
ourselves. That would be fun.

Riggan looks at himself in the mirror and begins to pull at
his hair. As it comes off his head, we discover it was a wig.
He turns away from the mirror, trying desperately to stay
calm. Something catches his eye: a vase of roses on the end
of the table. A card in them says, "They didn't have the
whatever you wanted - Sam". Enraged, Riggan focuses on the
vase. It begins to shift. Then, with a surge of anger,
without ever touching it, he sends it crashing against the
wall on the other side of the room.

The camera pans over the roses scattered across the floor. It
hovers over the carpet and around the perimeter of the room,
until it finally settles on Riggan, now dressed in a casual
blazer.

A5 A5

It is later the same day. He is sitting on the sofa and on three
chairs in front of him are three journalists:

Gabriel, a geeky theatre journalist, wearing thick glasses and
a thin tie. Clara, a reporter from an entertainment blog. And
Han, a polite, obese Japanese journalist, who sits next to his
translator, another Japanese guy.

GABRIEL
Why does somebody go from playing the lead
in a comic book franchise to adapting
Raymond Carver for the stage?

Riggan tries to remain calm.

GABRIEL (CONT’D)
I mean, as you're probably aware, Barthes
said, “The cultural work done in the past
by gods and epic sagas is now done by
laundry detergent commercials and comic
strip characters.” It's a big leap you've
taken...

Riggan shifts nervously.
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 12.

RIGGAN
Well... Absolutely. As you said... that
Barthes said... Birdman, like Icarus...

CLARA
Hang on. Who's this Barthes guy? Which
Birdman was he in?

GABRIEL
Roland Barthes was a French philosopher,
who--
CLARA
Oh. Okay. Sure. Now, is it true you’ve been
injecting yourself with semen from baby
pigs?

RIGGAN
What?

CLARA
As a method of facial rejuvenation.

RIGGAN
Who told you that?

CLARA
It was tweeted by... (checks her notes)
@prostatewhispers.

RIGGAN
It's a lie.

CLARA
I know. But did you do it?

RIGGAN
No!

GABRIEL
Are you afraid at all that people will say
you're doing this play to battle the
impression that you're a washed-up super
hero?

RIGGAN
No. I’m not. And that’s exactly why
20 years ago I refused to do
Birdman 4.

HAN
Birdman 4??? You do Birdman 4???

Jake opens the door and the camera pans to him.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 13.

JAKE
Okay. That's enough for today.
Thank you for coming. We’re
expecting some great pieces from
you...

Riggan stares at the Birdman poster.

JAKE (CONT’D)
Publicity guys are trying to get
you a Times feature.
Riggan stands up and pulls the Birdman poster off of the
wall.

JAKE (CONT’D)
So, How’d it-- Whoa. If I were you
I wouldn’t do that.

RIGGAN
I don’t want to look at it anymore.
JAKE
That was a present from the crew.
Don’t fuck with those guys, they’re
union.

RIGGAN
I don’t care.

Riggan leaves the poster on the floor, facing the wall, and
walks to the window. He opens it. We can hear distant drums
coming from the street.

JAKE
So... How'd it go?

RIGGAN
Great.

JAKE
(Worried.)
Did they ask about Ralph?

RIGGAN
Nope.

JAKE
Good. He did it, you know? The
motherfucker threatened to sue us.
Didn’t even wait to get out of the
hospital.

RIGGAN
And, what did you say?
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 14.

JAKE
What’d I say? I said, "You
motherfucker. You’re threatening
me? ME? I swear to god, you fuck, I
so much as get a letter from a
lawyer, the press’ll get the
pictures we got off your computer.”

RIGGAN
What pictures?
JAKE
The guy has a thing for nuns... in
diapers. What do you care? You
shouldn’t have any knowledge about
it anyway. The important thing is
that I made him go away.

RIGGAN
Right. That's great.
JAKE
Yeah, it’s fantastic. One problem.
We don't have an actor. And if we
cancel the first preview the press
will smell the blood. We can't
afford to lose any more money. At
all.

RIGGAN
What do you want me to do?

JAKE
We pay an understudy, let’s use the
understudy.

RIGGAN
No.

JAKE
No? Riggan, listen to me. Our dream actor
is not going to knock on that door and
say: "Hey fellas, when do we start?"

B5 B5

There is a knock at the door. Leslie peeks in.

LESLIE
Can I talk to you for a second?

RIGGAN
Yeah. What’s up?

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 15.

LESLIE
Did you find another actor?

RIGGAN
No.

LESLIE
Okay. Well... Mike's available.

RIGGAN
He is?
JAKE
Mike who?

RIGGAN
I thought he was doing--

LESLIE
He was. He quit. Or got fired.
JAKE
Mike who?

RIGGAN
Which one? Quit or fired?

LESLIE
With Mike it's usually both.

JAKE
Mike Fucking Who?

LESLIE
Shiner.

JAKE
Yes!

RIGGAN
Jake...
JAKE
Yes! How do you know Mike Shiner?

LESLIE
We share a vagina.

RIGGAN
You think he'd want to do it?

LESLIE
Yeah.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 16.

JAKE
How do you know?

LESLIE
Because he said he'd want to do it.

JAKE
Yes!

RIGGAN
Jake. Hang on a minute.
JAKE
(to Riggan)
Ask me if he sells tickets.

RIGGAN
Does he sell tickets?

JAKE
A shitload of tickets. Now ask me if the
critics like him?

RIGGAN
Do they like him?

JAKE
They want to spooge on him.

RIGGAN
(Indicating Lesley.)
Hey.

JAKE
Leslie...

LESLIE
Right on his face.

JAKE
Everything for a reason, right?
RIGGAN
You think he'll be able to come tonight?

LESLEY
I can call him and find out.

Riggan gives Jake a look.

JAKE
I'll call his agent.

Jake charges out of the room. The camera follows him into...
10/29/14 / 17.
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary Riggan Thomson witnesses a disastrous performance by Ralph during a play rehearsal. Chaos ensues and Riggan becomes increasingly frustrated as he realizes that his production is in jeopardy.
Strengths
  • Humorous dialogue
  • Effective portrayal of chaos and frustration
Weaknesses
  • Some dialogue may be confusing or unclear

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration faced by Riggan, and the humor adds an entertaining element.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of a struggling actor trying to produce a play while dealing with various challenges is interesting and relatable.

Plot: 8

The plot progresses as Riggan faces obstacles and realizes the jeopardy of his production.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the setting and conflicts are familiar in the context of a theater-based story, the specific situations and dialogue are unique. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 7

The characters are well-developed and their personalities shine through their dialogue and actions.

Character Changes: 6

Riggan experiences a shift in his mindset as he realizes the jeopardy of his production.

Internal Goal: 7

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to calm himself down and stay focused amidst the chaos and stress of the theater world. This reflects his deeper need for validation and success, as well as his fear of failure and irrelevance.

External Goal: 6

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to find an actor to replace the one who quit or got fired. This reflects the immediate challenge he is facing of putting on a successful play and avoiding negative press.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict between Riggan and the disastrous performance by Ralph creates tension and drives the scene.

Opposition: 8

The opposition in this scene is strong because the protagonist faces challenges and conflicts from multiple characters, such as Jake and Laura. The audience is unsure of how these conflicts will be resolved.

High Stakes: 8

The stakes are high as Riggan's production is in jeopardy and he must find a solution to save it.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by highlighting the challenges faced by Riggan and introducing the possibility of using Mike Shiner as an understudy.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it introduces unexpected elements, such as the protagonist's anger and the sudden appearance of an actor who can replace the one who quit. These elements keep the audience guessing about what will happen next.

Philosophical Conflict: 0

There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 7

The frustration and desperation felt by Riggan evoke empathy from the audience.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue is witty and humorous, adding depth to the characters and enhancing the overall tone of the scene.

Engagement: 8

This scene is engaging because it presents a series of conflicts and challenges for the protagonist, as well as witty and humorous dialogue. The tension and humor keep the audience interested in the outcome of the scene.

Pacing: 9

The pacing of the scene is effective because it balances moments of tension and conflict with moments of humor and reflection. The rhythm of the dialogue and the concise narrative description contribute to the overall pacing.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by dialogue and character actions. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


Critique
  • The scene starts off with a strong sense of urgency and tension, which is effective in grabbing the audience's attention.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Jake is engaging and reveals their conflicting priorities and motivations.
  • The introduction of the Birdman poster and Riggan's interaction with it adds depth to his character and hints at his internal struggles.
  • The scene effectively sets up the need for a new actor and creates anticipation for the introduction of Mike Shiner.
  • The inclusion of the journalists at the end of the scene adds an interesting dynamic and sets up future conflicts and challenges for Riggan.
  • The use of visual elements, such as the falling vase and Riggan pulling off his wig, adds visual interest and enhances the emotional impact of the scene.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding more physical actions or gestures to enhance the tension and urgency of the scene.
  • Explore opportunities for more subtext and hidden motivations in the dialogue between Riggan and Jake.
  • Consider adding more visual cues or symbolism to further explore Riggan's internal struggles and conflicts.
  • Ensure that the introduction of the journalists at the end of the scene is seamlessly integrated and does not feel forced or abrupt.
  • Consider adding more moments of silence or pauses to allow the audience to absorb the emotional impact of the scene.



Scene 5 -  Disastrous Rehearsal
6 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 6

...the hallway and as Jake makes a left turn, Annie enters from
the right.

JAKE
Annie, turn the work lights on and get me a
fresh copy of the script. We’re gonna have
a “put in” tonight.

ANNIE
Who?
JAKE
You’ll find out...

Jake disappears down the hall and we follow Annie through the
theater and onto...

7 INT. STAGE - THEATER - EVENING 7
...the stage, where she turns some of the stage work lights on.
We pan along the stage until we find Riggan, wearing the same
clothes as before, scanning the empty auditorium.

MIKE (O.S.)
Intimidating. Isn't it?

Riggan sees Mike Shiner (39) coming down the aisle, slovenly
dressed with mussed hair and intense eyes.

MIKE (CONT’D)
Do you have any idea who walked these
boards before you?
(Beat.)
Geraldine Page, Marlon Brando,
Helen Hayes, Jason Robards... And
now you. Riggan Thomson.

Riggan, trying to hide the intimidation.

RIGGAN
Thanks for coming on such short notice,
Mike. I appreciate it.

MIKE
Hey. This is what we do.
(Indicates a script.)
So, you wrote this adaptation?

RIGGAN
I did.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 18.

MIKE
And you're directing the adaptation and
starring...

RIGGAN
I am.

MIKE
Ambitious.

RIGGAN
Thank you.

A sly smile from Mike. He leaps onto the stage.

MIKE
Why don't we do a bit of it?

RIGGAN
Hey, I wasn't expecting you to--
MIKE
First preview is tomorrow, right?

RIGGAN
Yeah, but you can go on with the script
until you feel comfortable--

MIKE
Let's just do some of it.

Riggan tries to hide his excitement. He grabs the script from a
nearby table and walks it over to Mike.

RIGGAN
Take a look at page twenty--

MIKE
Yeah. I don't need that.

RIGGAN
What?

MIKE
I don't need the script. Just give me a
cue.

RIGGAN
What are you talking about?

MIKE
Feed me a line.

RIGGAN
I don’t-- What?
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 19.

MIKE
Feed. Me. A line.

Riggan drops the script and begins the scene.

RIGGAN
“I'm the wrong person to ask. I didn't
know the man. I've only heard his name
mentioned in passing. I wouldn't know.
You'd have to know the particulars. But
I think what you're saying is that love
is absolute.”

Mike stares at Riggan, hyper-focused.

MIKE
(Ruminating.)
Am I saying that love is absolute?
(He transforms.)
"Yeah. The kind of love I'm talking about
is. The kind of love I'm talking about you--
"
(An intense pause.)
Well, you don't try to kill people.

Riggan is transfixed, and almost immediately intimidated.

RIGGAN
How do you know the lines?

MIKE
I have a thing, a whatever, a gift.
(A beat.) Come on, I helped Lesley get
off book. Hey, give me that cue again.

RIGGAN
"I'm the wrong person to ask. I didn't
know the man. I've only heard his name
mentioned in passing. I wouldn't know.
You'd have to know the particulars. But
I think what you're saying is--”
MIKE
Okay, can I-- Do you mind if I--

RIGGAN
No, go ahead.

MIKE
Follow me. He says, "I'm the wrong
person to ask." What's his intention?
Is he fed up with the topic?
Deflecting? Guilt about his wife maybe?
Then four sentences all say the same
thing... "I didn't even know the man."
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 20.
MIKE (CONT'D)
"I've only heard his name mentioned in
passing." “I wouldn't know.” "You'd
have to know the particulars." First of
all, particulars? What are you, my
grandmother? But the point is, YOU
DON'T KNOW THE GUY, WE FUCKING GET IT.
Make it one line. "I didn't even know
the guy." Right? ...

RIGGAN
You pretty much know my lines too, huh?
MIKE
Can we-- Are we doing something here? Come
on let's go. Cut it down, give it to me
again.

RIGGAN
"I'm the wrong person to ask--"

MIKE
Oh, right, sorry, you see? "I'm the wrong
person to ask?" That's another fuck you.
"Don't put me on the spot. Don't make me
self conscious about my marriage when my
wife is sitting right here..." See? Give
it to me. Give me a good fuck you. Come
on...

RIGGAN
Okay, let me--

MIKE
Come on. Give it to me right now. Fuck me.
Right now. Right here. Let's do it.

RIGGAN
Okay, yeah...

MIKE
DO IT!
RIGGAN
(Jumps in w/out thinking.)
"Hey. I'm the wrong person to ask, okay? I
didn't even know the guy. So what's your
point?"

MIKE
"What's my point?"

RIGGAN
"What's your point? What are you saying?
Spit it out. You're saying, what? That love
is an absolute?"
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 21.

MIKE
(Exploding.)
"Yeah! Alright? The kind of love I'm
talking about is absolute. The kind of love
I'm talking about you--
(A painful memory.)
Well, you don't try to kill people.

Riggan stands silently, his heart pounding.

MIKE (CONT’D)
So what do you think, boss? Do I have a
job?

Riggan calls over to the wings.

RIGGAN
What do you think?

Mike turns to see Sam, who has been there for a bit.
SAM
Larry needs to see him for a fitting.

MIKE
I'm gonna take that as a yes.
(Walking to Sam.)
And you are...?

RIGGAN
That's my daughter, Sam.

MIKE
Right. Yeah. I can see it around the... (A
beat) She doesn't look anything like you.
(To Sam.)
And your job is...?

RIGGAN
She's my assistant.
MIKE
Your assistant...
(To Sam.)
And can you speak?

SAM
Yup. I can even 'sit', 'stay' or 'roll
over' if you have any treats.

RIGGAN
Welcome aboard, Mike.



(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 22.

MIKE
(Mock saluting.)
Thank you, Captain.

We follow Mike and Sam off as they...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary During a play rehearsal, Riggan Thomson witnesses a disastrous performance by Ralph. Chaos ensues and Riggan becomes increasingly frustrated as he realizes that his production is in jeopardy.
Strengths
  • Intense dialogue
  • Strong character interactions
  • Building tension
Weaknesses
  • Limited exploration of other characters

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively conveys the frustration and tension faced by Riggan as he witnesses the disastrous performance. The dialogue between Riggan and Mike is intense and engaging. The introduction of Sam adds a new dynamic to the scene.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of a struggling actor dealing with a disastrous rehearsal is compelling and relatable.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the disastrous performance and its impact on Riggan's production.

Originality: 7

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the setting of a theater and the interactions between actors are familiar elements in screenplays, the specific dialogue and character dynamics in this scene feel fresh and authentic. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters of Riggan and Mike are well-developed and their interactions drive the scene.

Character Changes: 7

Riggan experiences a shift in his perception of Mike's talent and becomes more open to his involvement in the production.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to impress Mike and gain his approval. This reflects Riggan's deeper need for validation and recognition as an actor and artist.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to have a successful rehearsal for the upcoming play. This reflects the immediate circumstances and challenges Riggan is facing as he prepares for the first preview.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict between Riggan and Mike, as well as the chaos of the disastrous performance, creates a high level of tension in the scene.

Opposition: 8

The opposition in this scene is strong, as Riggan is faced with the challenge of impressing Mike and gaining his approval. The audience is unsure of how this interaction will go and whether Riggan will be successful in his rehearsal. The opposition adds tension and conflict to the scene.

High Stakes: 9

The high stakes are evident as Riggan realizes that his production is in jeopardy due to the disastrous rehearsal.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by highlighting the challenges faced by Riggan and the potential impact on his production.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it introduces unexpected interactions and conflicts between the characters. The audience is unsure of how Riggan and Mike's rehearsal will go and what their dynamic will be like. The scene keeps the audience guessing and interested in the outcome.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between Riggan's desire for artistic integrity and Mike's more pragmatic approach to acting. This challenges Riggan's beliefs and values as he is forced to confront the idea that success in the theater may require compromising his artistic vision.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 8

The scene evokes a strong emotional response through the frustration and tension experienced by Riggan.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue between Riggan and Mike is intense, engaging, and reveals their personalities and motivations.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because it introduces conflict and tension between the characters, creates a sense of anticipation for the upcoming play, and showcases the unique dynamics of the theater world. The witty and sharp dialogue keeps the audience interested and invested in the characters' goals and relationships.

Pacing: 9

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by creating a sense of urgency and tension. The dialogue is fast-paced and the scene moves quickly between different locations and interactions. This keeps the audience engaged and interested in the unfolding events.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. The dialogue is properly formatted with character names and dialogue tags, and the scene description is concise and provides clear visual cues. The scene is easy to read and understand.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a clear location and time description, introduces the characters and their goals, and progresses through dialogue and action. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end, and transitions smoothly between different locations within the theater.


Critique
  • The scene starts abruptly without any transition from the previous scene. It would be helpful to have a smoother transition to establish the change in location and time.
  • The dialogue between Jake and Annie feels forced and lacks natural flow. It would benefit from more organic and realistic conversation.
  • The introduction of Mike Shiner feels sudden and his entrance lacks proper setup. It would be more effective to establish his presence earlier or foreshadow his arrival.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Mike is engaging and reveals their contrasting personalities. However, some of the lines feel repetitive and could be condensed for better pacing.
  • The scene lacks visual descriptions and actions, making it feel static. Adding more visual elements and actions would enhance the overall impact of the scene.
  • The ending of the scene feels abrupt and leaves the reader wanting more resolution or closure. It would be beneficial to have a stronger concluding moment or transition to the next scene.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding a transitional element or dialogue to smoothly transition from the previous scene to the hallway.
  • Revise the dialogue between Jake and Annie to make it more natural and realistic.
  • Foreshadow Mike Shiner's arrival earlier in the script to create anticipation and build his character.
  • Condense and streamline some of the repetitive dialogue between Riggan and Mike to improve pacing.
  • Include more visual descriptions and actions to make the scene more dynamic and engaging.
  • Develop a stronger concluding moment or transition to provide a sense of closure or anticipation for the next scene.



Scene 6 -  Meeting Mike Shiner
8 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 8

...advance through the hallways.

MIKE
I'm Mike Shiner, by the way.

SAM
I know who you are.
(Reluctantly honest.)
I saw you in 'Hothouse' at the Geffen. It
was... great.

MIKE
That ass is great.

She turns her head toward him with a disgusted expression.

SAM
Dude. Seriously?

Moving by her, into a dressing room.

MIKE
This is the theatre, honey. Don’t be so
self-conscious.

She follows him into the room where we see...
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary Sam meets Mike Shiner, a famous actor, in the hallway of the theater. Mike makes inappropriate comments and Sam is disgusted. They enter a dressing room.
Strengths
  • Sharp and witty dialogue
  • Introduction of an important character
Weaknesses
  • Does not do much to advance the overall plot
  • Not particularly impactful or memorable

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 7

The scene is well-written and introduces an important character, but it is not particularly impactful or memorable.


Story Content

Concept: 6

The concept of meeting a famous actor is interesting, but the scene does not do much to advance the overall plot.

Plot: 5

The scene does not do much to advance the overall plot.

Originality: 6

The situation of a male character making inappropriate comments to a female character is not unique, but the writer's approach to the dialogue and tension is fresh and authentic.


Character Development

Characters: 8

The introduction of Mike Shiner is a significant moment for the character of Sam and sets up an important dynamic for later in the story.

Character Changes: 3

There is not much character development in this scene.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal is to assert his dominance and sexual prowess over the female character. This reflects his need for validation and power.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal is not explicitly stated, but it can be inferred that he is preparing for a performance.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 3

There is some tension between Sam and Mike, but it is not a particularly high-stakes conflict.

Opposition: 7

The opposition is strong enough to create tension and discomfort for the audience, but it is not insurmountable.

High Stakes: 3

The stakes are not particularly high in this scene.

Story Forward: 4

The scene does not do much to advance the overall plot.

Unpredictability: 6

The scene is somewhat predictable in terms of the protagonist's behavior, but the audience is unsure of how the female character will react.

Philosophical Conflict: 8

The philosophical conflict is the clash between the protagonist's toxic masculinity and the female character's discomfort with his behavior. This challenges the protagonist's beliefs about gender roles and power dynamics.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 4

The scene is not particularly emotional.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue is sharp and witty, and effectively establishes the personalities of both Sam and Mike.

Engagement: 8

This scene is engaging because it creates tension and discomfort for the audience through the inappropriate behavior of the protagonist.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene is effective in building tension and discomfort for the audience.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The scene follows the expected formatting for its genre of a dialogue-driven character interaction.

Structure: 9

The scene follows the expected structure for its genre of a dialogue-driven character interaction.


Critique
  • The scene could benefit from more visual elements to heighten the tension and urgency of the situation.
  • The dialogue could be more concise and impactful, with less exposition and more subtext.
  • The character of Jake could be more fully developed to create a more complex and nuanced conflict with Riggan.
  • The scene could benefit from more sensory details to immerse the audience in the world of the play and the emotions of the characters.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding more visual elements, such as close-ups of Riggan's face or shots of the chaos on stage, to heighten the tension and urgency of the situation.
  • Revise the dialogue to be more concise and impactful, with less exposition and more subtext. Use body language and nonverbal cues to convey the characters' emotions and motivations.
  • Develop the character of Jake more fully to create a more complex and nuanced conflict with Riggan. Consider adding backstory or personal stakes for Jake to make his priorities more understandable and relatable.
  • Add more sensory details, such as sounds of chaos or smells of the theater, to immerse the audience in the world of the play and the emotions of the characters.



Scene 7 -  Costume Department Chaos
9 INT. COSTUME DEPARTMENT - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 9

...Larry stressing out while he works on a costume. He turns
to see Mike standing there. Sam stands against the wall,
focused on her cell phone.

LARRY
Oh, thank the Lord and pass the
biscuits! I finally have an actor to
dress. Hello, Mr. Shiner.

MIKE
How're you doing, Larry?

LARRY
Better, now that you're here. Take off your
clothes.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 23.

Mike takes off his shirt and hands it to Sam. She doesn't budge,
and it hits the floor. He begins to unbutton his pants...

MIKE
You gonna stand there?

SAM
(Glancing at her cell.)
This is the theatre, honey. Don’t be so
self-conscious.
Larry searches for a few costume pieces.

LARRY
Okay. I'm gonna have to start from
scratch, with less than twenty-four
hours... Let's see if these--

He turns to see a completely naked Mike.

LARRY (CONT'D)
Holy-- What is happening? Where are
your underpants?

MIKE
At home, under the bed, I think.

Sam glances at Mike for a second, then returns to her phone.
Larry begins to help Mike into some pants which, given the
situation, is very awkward.

LARRY
Okay. Everything is too small.

SAM
Yeah, you're not kidding.

Lesley enters the room immediately coming face to face with a
naked Mike. She doesn't notice Sam who is partially hidden by a
clothes rack. She just goes about trying a costume shirt.
LESLEY
Oh, that's nice...
(To Larry.)
Forgive him, Larry. Mike's like my five
year old son. Neither one of them has
clean underwear...

LARRY
Or pubic hair, I imagine.
(Folding the pants.)
Okay, well, I can take out the suit but
we're going to need some new pants and
shirts.
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 24.
LARRY (CONT'D)
(Looking back.)
And underwear...

Mike just stands there naked, staring at his penis in the
mirror.

LESLEY
(To Larry.)
This is too small.
(To Mike.)
What the hell are you doing?
MIKE
Waiting for Larry to finish.

LARRY
I'm finished.

Larry disappears deeper into the costume room.

MIKE
Okay, well, then I'm just standing here
with my balls out.

LESLEY
Get dressed. Riggan's daughter is hanging
around, and I don't need her to walk in
here and--

MIKE
Leslie...

LESLEY
No, Mike. You haven’t seen her. She’s
always hanging around, just-- I don’t--
Watching everyone. It’s creepy. It’s--

MIKE
Les...

LESLEY
I don’t know if the drugs fried her
brain or what, but I don't need her
running to her father saying you showed
her your junk.

MIKE
Okay, then we should probably get her out
of here.

Lesley's expression goes blank.

LESLEY
Oh, God. Really?

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 25.

MIKE
Hey, Sammy...

SAM
It's Sam.

LESLEY
Fuck.

Sam steps forward.
LESLEY (CONT'D)
(To Sam.)
I didn't mean--

SAM
(Totally relaxed.)
It's cool. He's a handful, huh?

They both look back at Mike.
LESLEY
Almost.

Sam smiles at her and exits. Lesley wheels on Mike.

LESLEY (CONT’D)
Jesus... How is it you always manage to find
a new way to humiliate me?

MIKE
To be fair, you make it really easy.

LESLEY
What the hell was she doing here?

MIKE
She brought me.

LESLEY
And stayed???
MIKE
I know, right? She's a little--

LESLEY
Look at me, Mike. This is Broadway. I'm
here. Finally. And I'm begging you, if you
love me, please, do me a favor... don't
fuck it up.

MIKE
(Gently.)
Come here.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 26.

Lesley moves toward Mike. He cups her face in his hands
tenderly. They are face to face.

MIKE (CONT’D)
Play with my balls...

She twists his nipples hard and walks out.

MIKE (CONT’D)
I won't fuck it up... Probably!
Larry reappears holding some clothes. We follow him out...
Genres: ["Comedy","Drama"]

Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Larry, the costume designer, struggles to find appropriate clothes for Mike, who is completely naked. Lesley, another actor, enters and is shocked by the situation. Sam, Riggan's daughter, is also present and remains unfazed. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike.
Strengths
  • Humorous dialogue
  • Tension and conflict
  • Strong character reactions
Weaknesses
  • Limited character development
  • Lack of emotional depth

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively combines humor and tension, creating an entertaining and engaging moment. The dialogue is witty and the characters' reactions add depth to the scene.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of chaos in the costume department due to an actor's inappropriate behavior is interesting and provides comedic and dramatic opportunities.

Plot: 7

The plot of the scene revolves around the chaos caused by Mike's behavior and Lesley's reaction to it. It adds conflict and tension to the overall story.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of dressing an actor for a performance is familiar, the specific dialogue and character interactions add a fresh and comedic twist. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 8

The characters' reactions and interactions in this scene reveal their personalities and relationships. Their distinct traits contribute to the humor and tension.

Character Changes: 5

There is minimal character change in this scene, as it primarily focuses on the chaotic situation rather than character development.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to successfully dress the actor, Mike, for his performance. This reflects Larry's desire to do his job well and contribute to the success of the production.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to find new pants and shirts for Mike. This reflects the immediate challenge of dressing an actor who doesn't have appropriate clothing.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 8

The conflict between Mike's inappropriate behavior and Lesley's frustration creates tension and drives the scene forward.

Opposition: 6

The opposition in this scene is moderate. While there are challenges and conflicts, such as finding appropriate clothing for Mike and dealing with Lesley's frustration, they are resolved relatively easily and without significant consequences.

High Stakes: 6

The stakes are relatively high as the success of the Broadway production is at risk due to Mike's behavior.

Story Forward: 7

The scene moves the story forward by highlighting the challenges and conflicts faced by the characters in the production.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it includes unexpected character actions and dialogue, such as Mike standing naked in front of the other characters and Lesley twisting his nipples. These moments add surprise and humor to the scene.

Philosophical Conflict: 0

There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 6

The scene elicits a mix of emotions, including amusement, frustration, and embarrassment.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue is sharp, witty, and reveals the characters' personalities. It adds humor and depth to the scene.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because it presents a humorous and chaotic situation, with witty dialogue and unexpected character interactions. The audience is drawn into the scene and interested to see how the characters will navigate the challenges.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by maintaining a fast and energetic rhythm. The quick dialogue exchanges and comedic moments keep the scene moving and hold the audience's attention.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes scene headings, character names, dialogue, and action descriptions in a clear and organized manner.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It establishes the setting, introduces the characters, and progresses the action through dialogue and character interactions.


Critique
  • The scene starts abruptly in the costume department without any transition from the previous scene. It would be helpful to have a brief establishing shot or a line of dialogue to indicate the change in location.
  • The dialogue between Larry, Mike, and Sam feels disconnected from the main conflict between Riggan and Jake. It distracts from the urgency and tension of the scene.
  • The interaction between Larry, Mike, and Sam could be shortened or cut entirely to focus more on Riggan and Jake's conversation.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Jake lacks depth and complexity. It would benefit from more subtext and emotional layers to reflect the high stakes of their conflict.
  • The scene ends abruptly with Riggan entering his dressing room. It would be more effective to have a stronger closing moment that leaves the audience with a sense of anticipation or tension.
  • The visual elements and actions in the scene are minimal and do not contribute significantly to the storytelling. Consider adding more visual cues or actions to enhance the scene.
  • The emotional tone of the scene is tense and urgent, but it could be further heightened by incorporating more dramatic pauses, gestures, or facial expressions.
  • The dialogue between Larry, Mike, and Sam could be rewritten to better reflect their personalities and relationships.
  • Consider adding more conflict or obstacles within the scene to increase the dramatic tension and keep the audience engaged.
Suggestions
  • Add an establishing shot or a line of dialogue to indicate the change in location from the previous scene.
  • Streamline or remove the dialogue between Larry, Mike, and Sam to focus more on Riggan and Jake's conversation.
  • Revise the dialogue between Riggan and Jake to add more subtext and emotional depth.
  • Create a stronger closing moment that leaves the audience with a sense of anticipation or tension.
  • Incorporate more visual cues or actions to enhance the storytelling.
  • Use dramatic pauses, gestures, or facial expressions to heighten the emotional tone of the scene.
  • Rewrite the dialogue between Larry, Mike, and Sam to better reflect their personalities and relationships.
  • Introduce more conflict or obstacles within the scene to increase the dramatic tension.



Scene 8 -  Chaos and Revelations
10 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 10
...through the hallway. He walks by Jake and Riggan who are mid
conversation. We stay with them.



RIGGAN (O.S.)
I don’t care, sign it.
JAKE (O.S.)
Listen to me.

RIGGAN (O.S.)
No you listen to me--

JAKE (O.S.)
I can’t afford to listen to you...

LARRY
I’m gonna need to go shopping
again.

JAKE
Fucking sew something, you old
fuck!

RIGGAN
I don't care. Give him what he
wants.
JAKE
His agent is asking for almost four
times what we were paying--

RIGGAN
Then go into the reserve.

JAKE
The reserve is gone. You spent it
on the fog. And those fake trees...
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 27.

RIGGAN
It’s a dream sequence, it--

JAKE
And three union midgets that dance
around like--

RIGGAN
You’re not supposed to call them
midgets--
JAKE
The reserve is gone!

RIGGAN
Listen to me, you didn't see what I
just saw. But you will, at the preview
tomorrow. Look, get the contract done.
I'll get the money.

Riggan begins marching toward the stage.
JAKE
(Calling after him.)
When???

Laura comes down some stairs and chases Riggan.

LAURA
(Incredulous.)
Hey, is it true? Shiner?

RIGGAN
He's in.

LAURA
Holy shit! When can I meet him?

RIGGAN
He's in a fitting with Larry.
Lesley comes down the hallway.

LESLEY
I’m going to Starbucks. You guys
want anything?

RIGGAN
I’m fine. How’s Mike?

LESLEY
Did you talk to your daughter?

RIGGAN
No.
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 28.

LESLEY
He’s great.

LAURA
(To Lesley. Matter-of-
factly.)
Honey, your tits look like fucking
anjou pears in that top!

LESLEY
(Uncomfortable.)
Okay, well I'm gonna-- Thank you.

She walks away.

LAURA
And that ass. Like two eggs in a hanky!

A10 A10

Riggan walks, Laura follows him.

LAURA
Okay, I was going to tell you this over
dinner, but everything-- I have some news
too.
RIGGAN
Good or bad? Cause right now--

A technician walks by.

LAURA
(Whispering.)
I missed my last two periods.
(Beat.)
I think it's happening this time.

Riggan stops. Silent. A beat.

LAURA (CONT'D)
Is that good or bad?
(He stares at her.)
Riggan...?

RIGGAN
It's good. It's great.
She smiles, her eyes filled with emotion. Riggan smiles back,
and nods absently.

LAURA
Say something else...

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 29.

RIGGAN
(Joking.)
You're pretty sure it's mine?

LAURA
(Unamused but plays along)
Well, let's see. There's you. Jake. That
masseuse wore a condom so... Yes, it's
yours... idiot.

She puts her head on Riggan's chest. We see his mind racing.
Laura is moved, and confused.

LAURA (CONT'D)
Are you excited?

RIGGAN
Yeah.

LAURA
Me too.
Laura moves slightly away from him and suddenly slaps him across
the face. Riggan looks at her, confused.

RIGGAN
What--?

LAURA
You're not funny.

She kisses him intensely on the lips and briefly places his
hand on her belly, then moves it up to her breasts. After a
moment, she backs away.

LAURA (CONT'D)
First preview tomorrow. Here we go!

Laura turns and walks away. Riggan continues down the
corridor. He passes by a Security Guard· in front of a small
TV. The camera becomes Riggan’s POV and advances until...
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary Riggan Thomson witnesses a disastrous performance by Ralph during a play rehearsal, causing chaos and frustration. Meanwhile, Sam meets Mike Shiner, a famous actor, in the hallway and is disgusted by his inappropriate comments. In the costume department, Mike's behavior continues to cause chaos as Larry struggles to find appropriate clothes for him. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior, but he tries to make amends. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths "Sharp and engaging dialogue, well-developed characters, effective balance of humor and drama, exploration of themes, and high stakes."
Weaknesses "Some may find the chaotic nature of the scene overwhelming or confusing."

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively captures the chaotic atmosphere and frustration faced by the characters, while also introducing a significant plot development with Laura's pregnancy revelation. The dialogue is sharp and engaging, and the scene successfully balances humor and drama.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of the scene revolves around the challenges and conflicts faced during theater production, as well as the personal relationships and dynamics between the characters. It effectively explores the themes of ambition, ego, and the blurred lines between reality and performance.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the disastrous performance by Ralph, the chaos caused by Mike's inappropriate behavior, and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy. These elements create tension and drive the story forward, setting up conflicts and character arcs.

Originality: 3

This scene does not display a high level of originality. The situations and dialogue are relatively familiar and do not offer any fresh approaches.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters in the scene are well-developed and their personalities shine through their interactions. Riggan is frustrated and determined, Sam is disgusted, Mike is arrogant yet remorseful, Lesley is shocked and confrontational, and Laura is emotional and confused. Their distinct personalities create conflict and drive the scene.

Character Changes: 7

While there are no significant character changes in this particular scene, the interactions and conflicts set up potential character arcs and development. Riggan's determination and frustration may lead to personal growth, while Laura's pregnancy revelation introduces a new dynamic for her character.

Internal Goal: 0

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is not clearly defined.

External Goal: 8

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to get the contract done and secure the money for the play.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The scene is filled with conflicts, both internal and external. Riggan faces the challenge of saving his production, while dealing with conflicts between him and Jake, and the chaos caused by Mike. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior, creating a tense confrontation. The conflicts drive the scene and create tension.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is strong, with characters disagreeing and facing challenges in securing the money for the play.

High Stakes: 8

The stakes are high in the scene as Riggan's production is in jeopardy, and the success of the play is crucial for his career and personal fulfillment. Additionally, Laura's pregnancy revelation adds a new layer of stakes and potential consequences.

Story Forward: 9

The scene moves the story forward by introducing conflicts, plot developments, and character dynamics. The disastrous performance, Mike's behavior, and Laura's pregnancy revelation all have significant implications for the overall story.

Unpredictability: 4

This scene is somewhat unpredictable because of the unexpected slap and intense kiss between the characters.

Philosophical Conflict: 0

There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 8

The scene evokes a range of emotions, including frustration, disgust, shock, excitement, confusion, and intimacy. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an emotional layer to the scene, creating a mix of joy and confusion for Riggan.

Dialogue: 8

The dialogue in the scene is sharp, witty, and engaging. It effectively conveys the frustration, disgust, shock, and confusion felt by the characters. The humor adds depth and entertainment value to the scene.

Engagement: 7

This scene is engaging because of the quick, snappy dialogue and the tension between the characters.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene is effective in building tension and maintaining the audience's interest.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with clear scene headings and dialogue formatting.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with clear dialogue and scene direction.


Critique
  • The dialogue in this scene is effective in conveying the tension and urgency of the situation. However, there are a few moments where the dialogue feels a bit repetitive and could be tightened up to maintain the pacing.
  • The introduction of Laura's pregnancy news feels a bit abrupt and out of place in the context of the scene. It may be more effective to save this reveal for a later scene where it can be given more focus and emotional impact.
  • The physical actions and movements of the characters could be further emphasized to enhance the visual elements of the scene. This could help to create a more dynamic and engaging visual experience for the audience.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Jake is well-established, but it could be further developed and explored to add depth to their relationship and increase the stakes of their disagreement.
  • The scene ends somewhat abruptly with Riggan entering his dressing room. Consider adding a final beat or moment of resolution to provide a stronger sense of closure and transition to the next scene.
Suggestions
  • Consider tightening up the dialogue to maintain the pacing and avoid repetition.
  • Reconsider the placement of Laura's pregnancy reveal to a later scene for greater impact.
  • Enhance the physical actions and movements of the characters to create a more visually engaging scene.
  • Further develop and explore the conflict between Riggan and Jake to add depth to their relationship.
  • Add a final beat or moment of resolution to provide a stronger sense of closure and transition to the next scene.



Scene 9 -  Chaos in the Costume Department
11 INT. BACKSTAGE - THEATER - EVENING 11

...we go through the stage door. We scan the backstage area to
see the stagehands ready to do their jobs. We can feel the
electricity of a first preview.

On stage part of the kitchen set from before is visible. Annie
stands at her podium, calling the cues for the show.

ANNIE
(Into her headset.)
Cue 34 and 35. Go.
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 30.

She turns and looks directly into the camera.

ANNIE (CONT'D)
Places.

RIGGAN (O.S.)
Okay.

Riggan walks on screen wearing his costume, carrying a bucket of
ice and a bottle of gin. He goes to the opposite side of the
stage and takes his place in the wings. He peeks out at the
audience who seem to be watching with interest.

Then we pan to the stage to find Mike, Lesley and Laura
performing the scene we saw at the beginning, around the table.
Mike looks comfortable, sipping at his drink. A half empty
bottle of gin on the table.

MIKE
The maniac shot himself right in front of
us. I rode with him in the ambulance to the
hospital.

LESLEY
I’ll never get that image out of my head.
Right before he did it, his eyes-- they
were so sad... lonely.

LAURA
Did you have to treat him?

MIKE
I didn’t have to. But I did.
(Pouring another drink.)
He was in bad shape. His head swelled
up to like twice the size of a normal
head. I'd never seen anything like
it. And I swear to God, I hope I
never do again.

Riggan stands near Annie.
RIGGAN
He’s good.

ANNIE
He’s incredible. I think he's
drinking real gin.

Riggan looks out at Mike, who is refilling his glass.

RIGGAN
What?


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 31.

A stagehand gives Riggan a bottle. Riggan watches and waits
for his cue.

MIKE
Ask Nick what real love is. He’ll
agree with me. You watch.

LESLEY
Why don’t we just head to the
restaurant?
LAURA
Don’t get him started, Mel. You
haven’t seen how he’s been lately.
He’s been depressed. I’m worried
about him. He’s been--

She gently pushes Riggan and we follow him on stage...
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary During a play rehearsal, Riggan Thomson witnesses a disastrous performance by Ralph, causing chaos and frustration. Meanwhile, Sam meets Mike Shiner, a famous actor, in the hallway and is disgusted by his inappropriate comments. In the costume department, Mike's behavior continues to cause chaos as Larry struggles to find appropriate clothes for him. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior, but he tries to make amends. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths "The scene effectively portrays chaos and frustration, introduces significant conflicts and plot developments, and features engaging dialogue and interactions between characters."
Weaknesses "The emotional impact could be further heightened, and the character changes could be more pronounced."

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration within the production, while also introducing a significant plot development with Laura's pregnancy revelation. The dialogue and interactions between characters are engaging and contribute to the overall tension and conflict.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of showcasing the challenges and chaos behind the scenes of a theater production is well-executed in this scene. It effectively captures the struggles of the costume department and the inappropriate behavior of a famous actor, adding depth to the overall story.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the disastrous performance by Ralph, the inappropriate behavior of Mike Shiner, and the struggles of the costume department. These elements create tension and conflict, driving the story forward and setting up future developments.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of observing a performance backstage is not entirely unique, the specific details and dialogue add authenticity to the characters' actions and emotions.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters in this scene are well-developed and their interactions contribute to the overall conflict and tension. Riggan, Sam, Mike, Lesley, and Laura each have distinct personalities and motivations, which adds depth to the scene and the story as a whole.

Character Changes: 6

While there are some minor character changes in this scene, such as Lesley confronting Mike and Laura revealing her pregnancy, the focus is more on the external conflicts and chaos. The character changes could be further developed to have a stronger impact.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to observe and assess the performance of Mike, who is drinking real gin on stage. This reflects Riggan's desire for validation and success as a director.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to ensure the smooth running of the show and to observe the audience's reaction. This reflects the immediate circumstances and challenges of putting on a successful performance.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict in this scene is high, with multiple characters clashing and tensions rising. The inappropriate behavior of Mike Shiner creates conflict within the costume department, while Lesley confronts him about his actions. The conflict drives the scene forward and adds intensity.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is moderate, as there is a potential conflict between Riggan's desire for a successful performance and Mike's unpredictable behavior.

High Stakes: 7

The stakes in this scene are relatively high, as the chaos and conflicts threaten the success of Riggan's Broadway production. The inappropriate behavior of a famous actor and the struggles in the costume department add tension and raise the stakes.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by introducing significant conflicts and plot developments. The disastrous performance by Ralph and the inappropriate behavior of Mike Shiner create obstacles for Riggan's production. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a new layer of complexity to the story.

Unpredictability: 6

This scene is somewhat unpredictable because it introduces the element of Mike drinking real gin on stage, which adds tension and uncertainty to the performance.

Philosophical Conflict: 0

There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 7

The scene evokes a range of emotions, including frustration, disgust, shock, and confusion. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an emotional layer to the scene. However, the emotional impact could be further heightened with more exploration of the characters' internal struggles.

Dialogue: 8

The dialogue in this scene effectively conveys the frustration, disgust, and shock felt by the characters. It also reveals important information about the characters' relationships and motivations. The dialogue contributes to the overall tension and conflict in the scene.

Engagement: 8

This scene is engaging because it provides insight into the characters' emotions and relationships, as well as the anticipation of the performance.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene is effective in building tension and maintaining the audience's interest, with a mix of dialogue and descriptive action.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with proper indentation, dialogue formatting, and scene direction.

Structure: 9

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with clear scene headings, descriptions, and dialogue.


Critique
  • The scene could benefit from more visual elements to break up the dialogue-heavy nature of the conversation.
  • The dialogue could be more specific and nuanced to reveal more about the characters and their motivations.
  • The emotional tone could be heightened with more attention to the physical actions and reactions of the characters.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Jake could be more clearly defined and escalated throughout the scene.
  • The scene could benefit from more subtext and tension to keep the audience engaged.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding more physical actions for the characters to break up the dialogue and add visual interest.
  • Rewrite the dialogue to reveal more about the characters and their motivations, making it more specific and nuanced.
  • Pay attention to the physical actions and reactions of the characters to heighten the emotional tone of the scene.
  • Clarify and escalate the conflict between Riggan and Jake throughout the scene to keep the audience engaged.
  • Add more subtext and tension to the scene to keep the audience engaged and invested in the outcome.



Scene 10 -  Chaos in the Costume Department
12 INT. STAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 12
...where Mike goes to refill his glass with the last of the
real gin. Riggan snatches the bottle out of his hands and
gulps the rest, straight from the bottle.

RIGGAN
Been what? (Beat.) I'll tell you
what real love is. This happened a
few months ago.
(Drops bottle on table)
And it ought to make us ashamed
when we talk like we know what
we're talking about when we talk
about love.

LAURA
Nick, for God's sake. Are you
getting drunk?

RIGGAN
(Pointed at Mike.)
I don't have to be drunk to say
what I think.

MIKE
Nobody’s drunk. We’re just having a
few drinks.

LESLEY
You’ve had more than a few.

RIGGAN
What are you, counting?

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 32.

LAURA
Don't you talk to her like that.
Don’t talk like a drunk if you’re
not--

RIGGAN
(Exploding.)
Shut up. For once in your life.
Will you do me a favor and shut up
for a minute?
(Beat.)
Like I was saying... There's this
old couple, had a car wreck out on
the interstate. Some drunk kid
plowed his dad's pick up into their
camper.

We begin to hear the underscoring of violins.

RIGGAN (CONT'D)
Fucking teenager. By the time I got
to the hospital, the kid was dead.
He was off in a corner laid out on
a gurney. We took the old couple up
to the O.R.. They were a mess. We
worked like hell on them for most
of the night...

Over the speech, Mike reaches for the new bottle that Riggan
placed on stage. He refills his glass.

RIGGAN (CONT'D)
When we were done, we wrapped them in full
body casts. The husband was depressed.
Even when I told him his wife was gonna
pull through, he was still depressed. So,
I got up to his mouth hole and asked him,
and he told me it was because he couldn't
see her through the eye holes. Can you
imagine? I’m telling you, the man's heart
was breaking because he couldn't turn his
goddamn head and see his goddamn wife.

Riggan is doing a good job. Lesley and Laura are genuinely
moved. Mike notices. He sips his drink.

RIGGAN (CONT'D)
I mean... It was killing him. Killing him
that he--

MIKE
I'm tired of this shit.

They all look at Mike. In silence.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 33.

MIKE (CONT’D)
(to Riggan)
What the fuck is this? Water?

He hurls the glass against the wall. Some laughter from the
audience. Riggan stares at him, confused. He presses on.

RIGGAN
It was killing the old bastard...

MIKE
Did you just give me water?

RIGGAN
Come on, Mike.

MIKE
Come on what?

RIGGAN
Take it easy. You're drunk.
MIKE
Of course I'm drunk! I'm supposed to
be drunk! This is Carver, man! The guy
lost a piece of liver every time he
wrote a page! If I’m supposed to drink
gin then bring me fuckin gin! I mean,
you fucked the time period! You took
all the good lines for yourself! At
least let me--

The audience is now hysterical. Dozens of cell phones
pointing at the stage. Mike walks toward the apron, facing
the audience.

MIKE (CONT’D)
Oh, okay. Seriously? You people are
pathetic. Put the cell phones down and
join the real world! Will somebody
please just live in the real world?!!
He crosses to the refrigerator.

LAURA
Where's he going?

LESLEY
(Firmly.)
Mike, cut it out.

Mike rummages through the fridge.



(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 34.

MIKE
Look at this. It’s all fake.
(Tossing items out of the
fridge.)
The milk is fake. The butter is fake.

Riggan storms off the stage.

MIKE (CONT’D)
(To Riggan.)
Your performance is fake.
(He finds some fried
chicken.)
Hey! There's chicken. Real chicken. The
only thing real up here is the chicken.
So I'm gonna stick with the chicken.

The audience laughs harder.

MIKE (O.S.) (CONT’D)
Hey, this is good bird, man!
Riggan charges through the chaos backstage running into a
panicked Annie.

RIGGAN
Get Mike out of here.

ANNIE
How do you want me to do that?

Riggan keeps walking up to...
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Larry, the costume designer, struggles to find appropriate clothes for Mike, who is completely naked. Lesley, another actor, enters and is shocked by the situation. Sam, Riggan's daughter, is also present and remains unfazed. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths
  • Effective portrayal of chaos and frustration
  • Confrontation between characters adds tension
  • Revelation of pregnancy adds a twist
Weaknesses
  • Lack of depth in character emotions and motivations
  • Dialogue could be more complex

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior, and the confrontation between Lesley and Mike adds tension. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an unexpected twist to the scene. However, the scene could benefit from more development of the characters' emotions and motivations.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of chaos and frustration in the costume department is well-executed, and the inappropriate behavior of a famous actor adds an interesting dynamic. However, the scene could delve deeper into the emotional impact of the situation.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the chaos caused by Mike's behavior and the confrontation between Lesley and Mike. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a subplot that adds complexity to the scene. The plot effectively moves the story forward and creates conflict.

Originality: 9

The level of originality in this scene is high. The situation of a disruptive actor causing chaos during a performance is a fresh approach to a familiar conflict. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


Character Development

Characters: 7

The characters in the scene are well-defined, with Mike as the provocative and disruptive actor, Lesley as the concerned and confrontational actor, and Sam as the unaffected observer. However, the scene could benefit from further exploration of their emotions and motivations.

Character Changes: 6

There is some character change in the scene, particularly with Lesley confronting Mike and Sam remaining unfazed by the chaos. However, the character changes could be more pronounced and impactful.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to express his thoughts and feelings about love and authenticity. It reflects his deeper need for validation and his fear of being seen as fake or insincere.

External Goal: 6

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to maintain control and order during the performance. It reflects the immediate challenge of dealing with a disruptive actor and keeping the audience engaged.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict in the scene is high, with the chaos caused by Mike's behavior and the confrontation between Lesley and Mike. The conflict creates tension and drives the scene forward.

Opposition: 8

The opposition in this scene is strong, with the disruptive actor challenging the protagonist's authority and causing chaos. The audience is unsure of how the situation will be resolved.

High Stakes: 7

The stakes in the scene are relatively high, as the chaos and inappropriate behavior could jeopardize the Broadway production. Additionally, the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds personal stakes for Riggan. However, the stakes could be further heightened and explored.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by introducing the chaos caused by Mike's behavior and the confrontation between Lesley and Mike. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a new element to the story. However, the scene could further develop the consequences and implications of these events.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because of the unexpected actions and outbursts of the characters. The audience is kept on their toes, unsure of how the situation will unfold.

Philosophical Conflict: 7

The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the tension between authenticity and performance. The protagonist's beliefs and values are challenged by the disruptive actor's actions and the audience's reaction.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 7

The scene elicits a mix of emotions, including frustration, confusion, disgust, and amusement. However, the emotional impact could be heightened with more exploration of the characters' emotions and motivations.

Dialogue: 8

The dialogue in the scene effectively conveys the frustration, confrontation, and humor. The lines reveal the characters' personalities and motivations. However, there could be more depth and complexity in the dialogue.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because of the intense emotions and conflict between the characters. The audience is drawn into the chaos and tension of the situation.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by creating a sense of urgency and tension. The dialogue and actions are fast-paced, keeping the audience engaged.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 8

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

Structure: 7

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by dialogue and character actions. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


Critique
  • The dialogue in this scene feels a bit repetitive and could benefit from some trimming. Consider condensing some of the lines to make the conversation more concise and impactful.
  • The emotional tension between Riggan and Jake could be heightened by adding more subtext to their dialogue. Explore their underlying motivations and desires to create a deeper conflict.
  • The visual elements in this scene could be enhanced to reflect the urgency and chaos of the situation. Consider incorporating more dynamic camera movements or staging to convey the heightened emotions.
  • The transition from the hallway to Riggan entering his dressing room feels abrupt and could be smoother. Consider adding a transitional moment or action to bridge the two locations.
  • The scene could benefit from more sensory details to immerse the audience in the environment. Explore ways to incorporate sounds, smells, or physical sensations to enhance the overall experience.
Suggestions
  • Condense and tighten the dialogue to make it more impactful.
  • Add subtext to the dialogue to deepen the conflict between Riggan and Jake.
  • Enhance the visual elements to reflect the urgency and chaos of the situation.
  • Smoothly transition from the hallway to Riggan entering his dressing room.
  • Incorporate sensory details to immerse the audience in the environment.



Scene 11 -  Costume Chaos
13 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 13
...the hallway. Jake chases him.

RIGGAN
I want him gone.

JAKE
No.

RIGGAN
What?

JAKE
We can't do that.

RIGGAN
What are you-- Of course we can do that.
It's our show.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 35.

JAKE
Riggan, listen to me--

Riggan comes to a halt and faces Jake.

RIGGAN
No. You listen to me. Get him the fuck out
of my play. Did you see him out there?

JAKE
It was a preview! Nobody gives a shit about
previews. Nothing matters until that old
bat from the New York Times is sitting in
that audience on opening night.

RIGGAN
We're getting rid of him. I’m not going to
stand up on that stage and--

JAKE
Shut up! Just shut up for once and
listen to me. As soon as we announced he
was taking over, the advance doubled. We
can't afford to lose a preview. We can't
afford to lose money. We can't afford to
lose Mike. This is about being
respected, validated, remember? That's
what you told me. That's how you got me
into this shit. Now, you're the
director. Get him under control.
(A beat. As a friend.)
These are not the nineties anymore.

Jake storms away. Riggan heads toward his dressing room. Out
of nowhere, Mike barrels into him, pinning him against a wall.

RIGGAN
(Startled.)
Holy Fuck!

Mike presses up against Riggan, breathing down his neck. After a
painful silence...

MIKE
(Like he's possessed.)
You were good...

RIGGAN
Meet me in front of the theater in
10 minutes.

Mike chuckles and slaps Riggan gently on the face before he
disappears into his dressing room. Riggan begins walking
again. We follow him into...
10/29/14 / 36.
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Larry, the costume designer, struggles to find appropriate clothes for Mike, who is completely naked. Lesley, another actor, enters and is shocked by the situation. Sam, Riggan's daughter, is also present and remains unfazed. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths
  • Effective portrayal of chaos and frustration
  • Believable character reactions
  • Tension and conflict in the confrontation
Weaknesses
  • Lack of impactful and memorable dialogue
  • Limited exploration of the theme

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively portrays chaos and frustration through Mike's inappropriate behavior and Larry's struggle to find clothes. The confrontation between Lesley and Mike adds tension and conflict. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an unexpected twist and emotional depth to the scene.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of chaos and frustration caused by inappropriate behavior and the struggle to maintain control in a theater production is well-executed in this scene.

Plot: 8

The plot progresses as Mike's behavior causes chaos and frustration, leading to a confrontation between Lesley and Mike. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a new layer of complexity to the story.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a protagonist facing challenges in the theater industry is familiar, the specific conflicts and dynamics between the characters feel fresh. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters are well-developed and their reactions to the chaotic situation are believable. Lesley's confrontation with Mike and Sam's unfazed attitude add depth to the scene.

Character Changes: 6

There is some character change as Mike tries to make amends, but it is not the central focus of the scene.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to regain control and respect in his play. This reflects his deeper need for validation and his fear of failure.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to get rid of Mike, who has taken over his role in the play. This reflects the immediate challenge of maintaining the success and reputation of the play.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 8

The conflict between Lesley and Mike adds tension to the scene, as well as the chaos caused by Mike's inappropriate behavior.

Opposition: 8

The opposition in this scene is strong, with Jake and Mike challenging Riggan's desires and beliefs. The audience is unsure of how Riggan will overcome these obstacles.

High Stakes: 7

The stakes are relatively high as the chaos caused by Mike's behavior could potentially ruin the Broadway production.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by showing the consequences of Mike's behavior and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because of the unexpected actions and reactions of the characters. The audience is unsure of how the conflicts will be resolved.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between Riggan's desire for artistic integrity and Jake's focus on financial success. This challenges Riggan's beliefs about the importance of being respected and validated as an artist.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 7

The scene evokes a mix of emotions, including frustration, shock, and confusion. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an emotional element.

Dialogue: 7

The dialogue effectively conveys the frustration, shock, and attempts at making amends in the scene. However, there could be more impactful and memorable lines.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because of the intense dialogue and the conflict between the characters. The audience is drawn into the power struggles and the high stakes of the theater world.

Pacing: 9

The pacing of the scene is fast and intense, with quick back-and-forth dialogue and minimal pauses. This contributes to the effectiveness of the scene by creating a sense of urgency and tension.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with proper indentation, spacing, and punctuation. It is easy to read and understand.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with clear scene headings, character names, and dialogue. The pacing and rhythm of the scene contribute to its effectiveness.


Critique
  • The dialogue in this scene feels a bit on-the-nose and could benefit from more subtext and nuance.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Jake is clear, but it could be more complex and layered to add more depth to the scene.
  • The scene could benefit from more visual elements or actions to break up the dialogue and add more interest to the scene.
  • The emotional tone of the scene is tense and urgent, but it could benefit from more variation to keep the audience engaged.
  • The scene ends somewhat abruptly and could benefit from a stronger closing beat to leave a lasting impression on the audience.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding more subtext and nuance to the dialogue to make it feel more natural and less on-the-nose.
  • Explore ways to add more complexity and layers to the conflict between Riggan and Jake to make it more interesting and engaging for the audience.
  • Think about adding more visual elements or actions to break up the dialogue and add more interest to the scene.
  • Experiment with varying the emotional tone of the scene to keep the audience engaged and interested.
  • Consider adding a stronger closing beat to the scene to leave a lasting impression on the audience.



Scene 12 -  Revelations and Reflections
14 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 14

...his dressing room. He goes into the bathroom and quickly
washes his face.

SYLVIA (O.S.)
What the hell was going on up there?

We pan over to see his ex-wife Sylvia (43), standing in one
corner, staring at Riggan. She is elegant and simply beautiful.

RIGGAN
I didn't know you were here tonight.
SYLVIA
That guy's an asshole, huh?

Riggan dries his hands with a towel and comes out of the
bathroom.

RIGGAN
What are you doing here?
SYLVIA
Sam and I are going to grab a bite
after she's finished with--

RIGGAN
No, I mean here. Now.

SYLVIA
Well. I know how much this means to
you, so--

RIGGAN
I appreciate that.

A beat.

SYLVIA
So, how's it going?

RIGGAN
The play?

SYLVIA
No, you and Sam.

RIGGAN
It's good. (A beat.) It’s the same.

SYLVIA
Do you talk to her?


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 37.

RIGGAN
We talk. We-- I don't know, it's been crazy
around here.

SYLVIA
You understand where her head is at right
now.

RIGGAN
Of course.
SYLVIA
She's trying to stay away from everything
and everyone that got her into rehab in the
first place, but...

RIGGAN
...I know, Sylvia...

SYLVIA
...But that's all she had. So she's--
RIGGAN
I really do get it.

SYLVIA
I know you're caught up in all this stuff,
but--

RIGGAN
Stuff...

SYLVIA
You know what I mean.
(Beat.)
Riggan... You don't have to be a great
father right now, you just have to be one.

RIGGAN
Yeah.
Suddenly, Laura opens the door and sticks her head in.

LAURA
(Noticing Sylvia.)
Oh, sorry.

She closes the door. Awkward silence.

SYLVIA
So how is that going? Is she and
Sam--?

RIGGAN
I don’t wanna talk about it.
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 38.

He goes to a small fridge, takes out a beer and closes it.

SYLVIA
You're drinking?

RIGGAN
I'm having a beer.

SYLVIA
Okay...
He sits and sips in silence for a moment. Then he begins to
take out the wig.

RIGGAN
So, what's going on with you?

SYLVIA
Me? Nothing. Everything's the same I guess.
I'm going back to teaching.
RIGGAN
I’m thinking about refinancing the Malibu
house.

SYLVIA
Wh-- I’m sorry?

RIGGAN
I’m thinking about--

SYLVIA
No, I heard you. I just need a second to--
(A beat.) That's gonna be Sam's house. Why
would you-- (A beat.) What? For this play?

RIGGAN
(Honest and vulnerable.)
I need the money.

SYLVIA
Do you have any idea how crazy that sounds?

RIGGAN
What do you want me to say? My health
lasted longer than the money... Go figure
that out.

Riggan seems pensive and lost.

SYLVIA
Riggan...
(Beat.)
What’s going on?... Look at me.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 39.

Riggan gently looks up to Sylvia.

RIGGAN
I have a chance to do something right. And I
have to take it. I have to.

SYLVIA
It’s funny. I was sitting here waiting
for you, and all of a sudden I couldn’t
remember why we broke up.
Silence. Then, as if he hasn’t heard what she said.

RIGGAN
The last time I flew here from LA, George
Clooney was sitting two seats in front of
me. With those cuff links, and that...
chin. We ended up flying through this
really bad storm. The plane started to
rattle and shake, and everyone on board
was crying... and praying. And I just sat
there-- Sat there thinking that when Sam
opened that paper it was going to be
Clooney's face on the front page. Not
mine. (A beat.) Did you know that Farrah
Fawcett died on the same day as Michael
Jackson?

She smiles sadly. She kisses him on the head and goes to the
door.

RIGGAN (CONT’D)
Why did we break up?

SYLVIA
(Looks him in the eye.)
You threw a kitchen knife at me...

Riggan is smacked by that memory. His eyes on the floor.

SYLVIA (CONT’D)
...and one hour later you were
telling me how much you loved me.
(Beat.)
Just because I didn't like that
ridiculous comedy you did with Goldie
Hawn didn't mean I did not love you.
But that's what you always do. You
confuse love with admiration.

She smiles sadly. He looks at her. As Sylvia opens the door,
she turns back to Riggan...



(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 40.

SYLVIA (CONT'D)
It's your house, so do what you want with
it. Just make sure you're there for our
daughter.

RIGGAN
I will.

SYLVIA
You're not Farrah Fawcett, Riggan.
She exits. Painful silence... until...

BIRDMAN (V.O.)
We should have done that reality show they
offered us. "The Thomsons." That would’ve
been good. Crazy, druggy, wise ass daughter.
Milfy wife with the perky tits. People would
have watched that.

RIGGAN
(To the poster.)
Shut up.

Riggan stands up and grabs his jacket. He opens the door and
goes out to...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In Riggan's dressing room, he has a conversation with his ex-wife Sylvia. They discuss their daughter Sam and Riggan's financial troubles. Sylvia advises Riggan to focus on being a father. Riggan reflects on his past and the fear of failure. The scene ends with Sylvia leaving and Riggan talking to his alter ego, Birdman.
Strengths "Strong performances, emotional depth, well-written dialogue"
Weaknesses "Some may find the scene slow-paced"

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively conveys the emotional turmoil and internal conflict of the protagonist, Riggan. The dialogue is well-written and the performances are strong.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of exploring Riggan's personal life and his struggle with fame and fatherhood is interesting and engaging.

Plot: 7

The plot of the scene focuses on Riggan's personal life and his relationship with his ex-wife. It adds depth to the overall story.

Originality: 6

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a conversation between an ex-spouse and a protagonist dealing with personal and professional challenges is familiar, the authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds a fresh approach to the scene.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters in this scene, particularly Riggan and Sylvia, are well-developed and their interactions feel authentic.

Character Changes: 8

Riggan experiences a significant emotional change in this scene as he reflects on his past and makes a decision to take a chance.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to navigate his complicated relationship with his ex-wife and daughter while also dealing with the pressures of his play. This reflects his deeper need for validation and connection with his family.

External Goal: 6

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to have a conversation with his ex-wife and understand her perspective on his relationship with their daughter. This reflects the immediate challenge of maintaining a healthy relationship with his family.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 6

There is a moderate level of conflict in this scene, primarily in the internal conflicts faced by Riggan.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is strong as the protagonist is faced with conflicting perspectives from his ex-wife and his own desires. The audience is unsure of how he will navigate this opposition and what choices he will make.

High Stakes: 6

The stakes in this scene are primarily internal, as Riggan grapples with his fear of failure and desire for personal redemption.

Story Forward: 7

The scene provides insight into Riggan's personal life and motivations, which contributes to the overall story.

Unpredictability: 6

This scene is unpredictable because it reveals unexpected details about the characters' past and their current emotional state. The audience is left wondering how the conversation will unfold and what impact it will have on the protagonist.

Philosophical Conflict: 7

There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between Riggan's desire for artistic success and his responsibility as a father. This challenges his beliefs about what it means to be a good father and how to prioritize his personal and professional life.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 9

The scene evokes strong emotions, particularly in Riggan's reflection on his past and his desire to do something meaningful.

Dialogue: 8

The dialogue in this scene is well-written and effectively conveys the emotions and conflicts of the characters.

Engagement: 7

This scene is engaging because it explores the complex emotions and relationships of the characters. The dialogue and character interactions create tension and intrigue.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing for moments of reflection and emotional depth. The rhythm of the dialogue and the pauses create a sense of tension and anticipation.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes scene headings, character names, dialogue, and action lines.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, introduces the characters, and progresses through their conversation.


Critique
  • The scene starts abruptly with Sylvia's entrance. It would be helpful to have a transition or a brief moment to establish her presence before she speaks.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Sylvia feels a bit disjointed and lacks a clear direction. It would benefit from more focused and purposeful conversation.
  • The conversation about Riggan's relationship with Sam feels forced and out of place in this scene. It doesn't contribute to the main conflict between Riggan and Jake.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Sylvia becomes repetitive and lacks depth. It would be more engaging to explore their past relationship and current dynamics in a more meaningful way.
  • The transition from Sylvia's exit to Birdman's voiceover feels abrupt and disconnected. It would be helpful to have a smoother transition or a clearer connection between the two.
  • The scene ends with Riggan entering his dressing room, but it doesn't provide a strong sense of resolution or closure. It would be more impactful to end the scene on a stronger note or with a clear decision or action by Riggan.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding a brief moment or action to establish Sylvia's presence before she speaks, such as Riggan noticing her in the corner or her entering the room.
  • Refine the dialogue between Riggan and Sylvia to have a clearer direction and purpose. Focus on their past relationship and current dynamics to add depth and tension to the scene.
  • Remove the conversation about Riggan's relationship with Sam as it doesn't contribute to the main conflict between Riggan and Jake. Instead, focus on their conflicting priorities and the consequences of Riggan's actions.
  • Explore Riggan's vulnerability and emotional state more deeply through his conversation with Sylvia. Show the impact of his choices and the weight of his responsibilities.
  • Create a smoother transition or connection between Sylvia's exit and Birdman's voiceover to maintain the flow and coherence of the scene.
  • Consider ending the scene with a stronger note or a clear decision or action by Riggan to provide a sense of resolution or closure.



Scene 13 -  Costume Chaos
15 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 15
...the hallway.

BIRDMAN (V.O.)
Where are we goin'?

RIGGAN
(Almost whispering.)
Leave me alone.

Riggan walks between crew members. Annie interrupts him.

ANNIE
The sun bed is here.

RIGGAN
What does that mean?

ANNIE
It means there's a sun bed out there
being delivered to in here.

RIGGAN
Who ordered a sun bed?


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 41.

ANNIE
Mike. He says it’s for his character.
Carver’s red necks, “people of the
land”. Part of his process and that
shit.

Riggan cannot deal with this right now. He continues walking
until he arrives at a metal door that takes him out to...

16 EXT. AN ALLEY WAY - OUTSIDE THE THEATER - CONTINUOUS 16

...an alley way. Riggan walks toward the street. There is a man
playing drums. Riggan finds Mike leaning against a parked car,
dazed and looking up at the marquis...

RIGGAN
Let’s go. Walk.

Riggan begins to walk, Mike follows.

MIKE
Where are we going?
RIGGAN
To get you some coffee. Have I done
anything to disrespect you?

MIKE
Not yet.

RIGGAN
I have a lot riding on this play.
MIKE
Is that right?

RIGGAN
People know who I am, and--

MIKE
Bullshit.

RIGGAN
Mike--

MIKE
Bullshit. People don’t know you. They
know the guy in the bird suit. They
know the guy who tells those quaint,
slightly vomitous stories on Letterman.

RIGGAN
Well, I’m sorry for being popular, but
that--
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 42.

MIKE
(With irony.)
Popular? POPULAR?... Oh God, popularity is
just the slutty little cousin of prestige.

RIGGAN
Okay, I don’t even know what that--

MIKE
My reputation is riding on this play.
And that's... That is...
RIGGAN
A lot?

MIKE
A lot. Exactly. Fuck you. Yes. This
doesn't work out for you, you get to go
home to your studio pals and jump right
back into that cultural genocide you
guys are perpetrating. “There’s a
douchbag born every minute”. That was
P.T. Barnum’s premise when he got rich
inventing the circus. And you and your
pals know nothing’s changed, and
whatever toxic shit you make people are
still gonna pay to see it. But, after
you’re gone, I’ll still be here. I’ll
still be making my living on the stage.
Baring my soul. Wrestling with emotions,
complex emotions.

RIGGAN
Right. Is that what tonight was about then?
(Mocking him.) Wrestling with “complex
emotions”?

MIKE
Tonight was about making it alive. About
making it bleed. This isn't the Warner
Brothers lot, Riggan. This is the city, and
this is how we do things.

Mike turns and opens the front door of The Rum House.

RIGGAN
Where are you going?

MIKE
They have coffee in here.

He walks into the restaurant. Riggan backtracks and we follow
him into...
10/29/14 / 43.
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Larry, the costume designer, struggles to find appropriate clothes for Mike, who is completely naked. Lesley, another actor, enters and is shocked by the situation. Sam, Riggan's daughter, is also present and remains unfazed. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths
  • Effective portrayal of chaos and frustration
  • Strong character reactions and conflicts
  • Surprising pregnancy reveal
Weaknesses
  • Limited character development in this specific scene

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's inappropriate behavior. It also introduces conflicts and emotions through the confrontation between Lesley and Mike, as well as the pregnancy reveal. The mix of emotions and confusion adds depth to the scene.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of chaos and frustration caused by inappropriate behavior is well-executed in the scene. It explores the consequences of such behavior in a professional setting and the impact it has on the characters involved.

Plot: 8

The plot progresses as the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior escalates. The confrontation between Lesley and Mike adds tension and conflict to the scene. The pregnancy reveal adds a surprising twist and raises questions about the future.

Originality: 7

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the setting and conflicts are familiar in the theater industry, the dialogue and the specific arguments between the characters are unique. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters' reactions to the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior are well-portrayed. Lesley's confrontation with Mike shows her determination to protect the production. Sam's unfazed attitude adds an interesting contrast. Laura's pregnancy reveal adds complexity to Riggan's emotions.

Character Changes: 7

While there are no significant character changes in this scene, it deepens the understanding of the characters' personalities and motivations. Lesley's determination to protect the production and Riggan's mix of emotions due to the pregnancy reveal hint at potential character development.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to deal with the stress and pressure of the play and his reputation. He wants to prove himself and maintain his reputation as a successful actor.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to get coffee for Mike. It reflects the immediate circumstances and challenges they are facing, such as the need for a break and a moment to relax.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict in the scene is high, with Lesley confronting Mike about his behavior and the chaos caused by his nudity. The conflict between Lesley and Mike adds tension and raises the stakes for the Broadway production.

Opposition: 9

The opposition in this scene is strong, with the characters engaging in a heated argument and challenging each other's beliefs and values. The audience is unsure of how the conflict will be resolved.

High Stakes: 8

The stakes are high in this scene as the chaos caused by Mike's behavior threatens the success of the Broadway production. The pregnancy reveal also raises personal stakes for Riggan and introduces uncertainty about the future.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by introducing conflicts, deepening character relationships, and raising questions about the future. The chaos caused by Mike's behavior and the pregnancy reveal have implications for the Broadway production and Riggan's personal life.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because of the unexpected arguments and insults exchanged between the characters. The audience doesn't know how the conflict will escalate or how the characters will react.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the clash between popularity and prestige in the entertainment industry. Mike criticizes Riggan's popularity and accuses him of perpetrating cultural genocide, while Riggan defends his success and popularity.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 8

The scene evokes a mix of emotions, including frustration, disgust, upset, and confusion. The pregnancy reveal adds an additional layer of emotional impact. The characters' reactions and the chaotic atmosphere contribute to the emotional intensity.

Dialogue: 8

The dialogue effectively conveys the frustration, irony, and emotions of the characters. The confrontation between Lesley and Mike showcases their conflicting perspectives. The dialogue also reveals insights into Riggan's fear of failure and Mike's views on popularity.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because of the intense and confrontational dialogue between the characters. The conflict and tension keep the audience interested and invested in the scene.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by maintaining a steady rhythm and flow. The dialogue exchanges are quick and intense, keeping the scene engaging and dynamic.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting. The scene is well-organized and easy to read.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It starts with a location and time description, followed by character actions and dialogue. The scene transitions smoothly between different locations.


Critique
  • The scene lacks clear direction and purpose. It feels like a transitional scene that doesn't add much to the story.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Annie about the sun bed feels out of place and doesn't contribute to the main conflict of the scene.
  • The emotional tone of the scene could be heightened to increase tension and urgency.
  • The scene could benefit from more visual elements to make it more engaging for the audience.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Jake could be more clearly defined and resolved in this scene.
Suggestions
  • Consider cutting the dialogue about the sun bed to streamline the scene and focus on the main conflict.
  • Add more physical action or visual elements to make the scene more dynamic.
  • Clarify the conflict between Riggan and Jake and give it a more satisfying resolution.
  • Consider adding more urgency and tension to the scene to make it more engaging for the audience.



Scene 14 -  Chaos in the Costume Department
17 INT. RUM HOUSE - CONTINUOUS 17

...The Rum House. Mike stands at the bar, the bartender
already pouring two whiskeys.

MIKE
(To bartender.)
Thanks, Tommy.

Tommy nods and walks away.

RIGGAN
(Getting back on point.)
People were laughing in our faces.

MIKE
(Handing Riggan a drink.)
Tonight they were laughing, tomorrow
they'll be... be.. tweeting about us. Fuck
‘em. Who cares??? These are the people who
pay half price to watch us rehearse. Stop
fucking caring!
RIGGAN
We’re doing Raymond Carver. This play is a
drama. This play is--

MIKE
You don’t know what this play is. These are
previews. This is where we find out what
the play is.

Mike points to an Older Woman sitting at the bar. She sips a
martini and scribbles in a notebook with a sour expression.

MIKE (CONT’D)
You see that woman over there? The one that
looks like she just licked a homeless guy’s
ass? Nothing matters until she writes five
hundred words about us in the New York Times.

RIGGAN
That's...
MIKE
Tabitha Dickinson. Yes. And, believe it or
not, the only thing that matters in theater
is whether she likes us or not. She does,
we run. She doesn't, we're fucked.

RIGGAN
(Preoccupied.)
She does look like she licked a homeless
guy’s ass.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 44.

MIKE
Do me a favor, don't get your panties in a
twist over a preview, alright? And don't tell
me how to do my job. Cause, this is my town.
And, to be honest, nobody gives a shit about
you around here.

LADY (O.S.)
You're Riggan Thompson, right?

Two fat tourists in "Mamma Mia" t-shirts, with a seven year old
kid, approach the table.

HUSBAND
(Timidly.)
We're sorry to interrupt...

LADY
Would you mind terribly if we got a
picture?
RIGGAN
Of course. It's no trouble at all.

The Lady shoves her camera into Mike's hands.

LADY
(To Mike.)
Would you mind?

Mike gets up with a blank expression and takes the camera.
The Lady pushes the kid into the booth next to Riggan.

LADY (CONT’D)
(Ordering Mike.)
The button right on top there.

KID
Who is this guy?

LADY
(To his son.)
Come on, Billy. He used to be like Batman.

She yanks the kid closer and they squeeze up against Riggan.
Mike takes the photo and holds the camera to the lady.

LADY (CONT’D)
(To Mike)
I think you screwed that one up. Take
another one.

Mike takes another picture.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 45.

LADY (CONT’D)
(To Riggan.)
God bless you, darlin’. You're very sweet.
And handsome!

She kisses Riggan hard on the mouth. Then gets up, giddy, and
takes her son by the hand. As the couple leaves, husband shoves
a five dollar bill into Mike’s hands.

HUSBAND
We really appreciate it.
An agitated Mike takes a sip of whiskey.

MIKE
Are we good here? Cause I’m gonna go.

RIGGAN
See you tomorrow.

Mike places the dollar under one of the shot glasses and begins
to walk away, but then stops and turns curiously.

MIKE
Why Raymond Carver? You never told me.

Riggan looks at Mike for a second, than reaches for his wallet
and produces an old cocktail napkin with some writing on it. He
slides it to Mike.

RIGGAN
A long time ago, I did a play back in
high school in Michigan. He was in the
audience. He sent this backstage after.

MIKE
"Thank you for an honest performance. Ray
Carver." What is this?

Riggan looks vulnerable. He is trying to make Mike understand
the importance of the napkin, to build a bridge between them.
RIGGAN
And that's when I knew I was going to
be an actor.

Mike can't stop himself from smiling.

RIGGAN (CONT’D)
Why is that funny?

MIKE
He wrote it on a cocktail napkin.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 46.

RIGGAN
So...

Mike slides the napkin back to Riggan.

MIKE
He was drunk.

A17 A17

He walks away and we follow him as he passes by the bar next
to Tabitha Dickinson, the Critic.

TABITHA
You headed to Hollywood, Mike?

Mike stops.
MIKE
Hollywood's headed here, Tabby.

TABITHA
(A devilish smile.)
Good luck with that.

Mike looks directly into her eyes.

MIKE
"A man becomes a critic when he can not be an
artist, in the same way that a man becomes an
informer when he cannot be a soldier."
Flaubert, right?

He flashes his own devilish smile. She stares back. If she
weren't so much older than him, you'd swear there was sexual
electricity between them.

TABITHA
He's a Hollywood clown in a Lycra bird
suit.

MIKE
Yeah. And at 8 o'clock tomorrow, he's gonna
get on stage and risk everything. What're
you gonna be doing?

A standoff.

TABITHA
Don't you ever worry that I'll give you a
bad review?



(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 47.

MIKE
Oh, I'm sure you will. If I ever give a bad
performance.
(Beat.)
Ms. Dickinson.

TABITHA
Mr. Shiner.

Mike smiles and waves over to an obviously nervous Riggan. He
goes toward the exit, but we stay with Tabitha, scribbling on
her notebook. Suddenly she raises her eyes and, with a dark
expression, looks at Riggan who is passing by.

We follow Riggan toward the exit. Through the window we see him
leave the restaurant. Then we pan to a wooden wall, and this
wall takes us to...
Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Larry, the costume designer, struggles to find appropriate clothes for Mike, who is completely naked. Lesley, another actor, enters and is shocked by the situation. Sam, Riggan's daughter, is also present and remains unfazed. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths "The scene effectively portrays chaos and frustration, the dialogue is sharp and engaging, and the performances of the actors are strong. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an unexpected twist to the story."
Weaknesses "There are no significant weaknesses in the scene."

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior, and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an unexpected twist to the story. The dialogue is sharp and engaging, and the performances of the actors convey the emotions of the characters effectively.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of the scene revolves around the chaos caused by Mike's inappropriate behavior and the emotional impact of Laura's pregnancy revelation. It effectively explores the dynamics between the characters and sets up conflicts and tensions.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the chaos in the costume department and the emotional revelation of Laura's pregnancy. It moves the story forward by introducing conflicts and tensions among the characters.

Originality: 7

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of dealing with a fan's request for a picture is familiar, the dialogue and character interactions bring a fresh and humorous perspective to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters in the scene are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed. The conflicts and tensions between the characters create engaging dynamics.

Character Changes: 7

While there are no significant character changes in this scene, the emotions and conflicts experienced by the characters contribute to their development and growth throughout the story.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to convince Riggan to stop caring about the audience's reaction and focus on the play. This reflects the protagonist's desire for artistic integrity and his fear of being judged by others.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to handle a fan's request for a picture. This reflects the immediate challenge of dealing with the public and maintaining a positive image.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 8

The scene is filled with conflicts and tensions, both internal and external. The chaos caused by Mike's behavior creates frustration and tension among the characters, and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds another layer of emotional complexity.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is strong because the protagonist faces challenges from both the critic and the fan. The audience is unsure of how these interactions will go, adding tension and conflict to the scene.

High Stakes: 7

The stakes in the scene are relatively high, as the chaos and tensions threaten the success of the Broadway production and the personal relationships of the characters. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds another layer of emotional stakes.

Story Forward: 8

The scene moves the story forward by introducing conflicts and tensions among the characters and revealing the unexpected twist of Laura's pregnancy. It sets up further developments and complications in the plot.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it introduces unexpected interactions between the characters, such as the fan's request for a picture and the protagonist's response to the critic. These moments add a sense of surprise and uncertainty to the scene.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the tension between artistic integrity and commercial success. The protagonist believes that the opinion of one influential critic can make or break a play, while the critic believes that the protagonist is a Hollywood clown.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 8

The scene evokes a mix of emotions, including frustration, confusion, and vulnerability. The conflicts and tensions between the characters create emotional intensity.

Dialogue: 9

The dialogue in the scene is sharp, witty, and engaging. It effectively conveys the emotions and motivations of the characters and drives the conflicts and tensions.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because it combines humor, tension, and character development. The witty dialogue and the conflict between the characters keep the audience interested and invested in the scene.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene is effective because it balances moments of tension and conflict with moments of humor and character development. The dialogue and actions flow smoothly, keeping the scene engaging and dynamic.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting. The action lines are clear and concise.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by character actions and dialogue. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


Critique
  • The scene starts off with Mike standing at the bar, but it is not clear who Mike is or his relationship to Riggan and Jake. It would be helpful to establish his character earlier in the screenplay.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Mike feels a bit repetitive and could be tightened up to make it more impactful.
  • The interaction with the fat tourists and the photo-taking moment feels out of place and disrupts the tension and urgency of the scene.
  • The conversation between Mike and Tabitha at the end feels forced and doesn't add much to the overall conflict between Riggan and Jake.
  • The scene ends abruptly with Riggan leaving the bar, but it would be more effective to have a stronger closing moment that leaves the audience wanting more.
Suggestions
  • Introduce Mike earlier in the screenplay and establish his relationship with Riggan and Jake.
  • Condense and streamline the dialogue between Riggan and Mike to make it more impactful.
  • Consider removing the interaction with the fat tourists and the photo-taking moment to maintain the tension and urgency of the scene.
  • Reconsider the conversation between Mike and Tabitha at the end and find a way to make it more relevant to the main conflict.
  • Create a stronger closing moment for the scene that leaves the audience wanting more.



Scene 15 -  Revelation and Conflict
19 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - LATER 19

...the theater hallway. Riggan walks through the quiet corridor,
until he arrives at...

20 INT. GREEN ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 20
...the Green Room. Sam sits listlessly, drawing some lines
across a roll of toilet paper.

RIGGAN
What're you still doing here?

SAM
(Continues scribbling.)
Nothing. I’m-- Nothing. Your costumes are
hanging in your room.

RIGGAN
Great...

SAM
I got the coconut water you wanted. If you
want me to get--

RIGGAN
Hey.

SAM
What?

RIGGAN
I'm not sure if I said thank you.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 48.

SAM
For what?

RIGGAN
All of it. You've been doing a good job.
And I've been...

SAM
Yeah.

RIGGAN
So, I just wanted to say that--
(He stops abruptly.)
What is that?

SAM
What...?

RIGGAN
That smell.
SAM
I don't--

RIGGAN
Look at me.

SAM
What are you--

RIGGAN
Look at me.

She does. He examines her eyes, then immediately rises, scouring
the room.

SAM
Dad...

RIGGAN
(Continuing to search.)
You have to be shitting me... Where is it?

SAM
Could we not do this?

Riggan pulls a jar of peanut butter from the trash.

RIGGAN
What is this?

SAM
That is chunky peanut butter that happens,
by the way, to have Omega--

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 49.

Riggan pulls a stubbed joint out of the jar.

RIGGAN
This.

SAM
Oh. That's pot.

RIGGAN
Sam.
SAM
Alright, just relax.

RIGGAN
Relax? What the hell are you doing?

SAM
Protecting myself from cataracts?

RIGGAN
You can't do this to me!

SAM
To you?

RIGGAN
SHUT UP! You know what I'm talking about.

SAM
Yeah. You're talking about you. What else
is new?

RIGGAN
Don't try to--

SAM
What? Make it about me? I wouldn't dream of
it.

RIGGAN
Listen to me. I'm trying to do something
that's important...

SAM
This is not important.

RIGGAN
It's important to me! Alright? Maybe not to
you, or your cynical playmates whose sole
ambition is to end up going viral and who,
by the way, will only be remembered as the
generation that finally stopped talking to
one another. But to me... To me... This is--
God. This is my career, this is my chance
(MORE)
(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 50.
RIGGAN (CONT'D)
to do some work that actually means
something.

SAM
Means something to who? You had a career
before the third comic book movie, before
people began to forget who was inside the
bird costume. You're doing a play based on
a book that was written 60 years ago, for
a thousand rich, old white people whose
only real concern is gonna be where they
go to have their cake and coffee when it's
over. Nobody gives a shit but you. And
let's face it, Dad, it's not for the sake
of art. It's because you just want to feel
relevant again. Well, there's a whole
world out there where people fight to be
relevant every day. And you act like it
doesn't even exist! Things are happening
in a place that you willfully ignore, a
place that has already forgotten you. I
mean who are you? You hate bloggers. You
make fun of twitter. You don't even have a
Facebook page. You're the one who doesn't
exist. You're doing this because you're
scared to death, like the rest of us, that
you don't matter. And you know what?
You're right. You don't. It's not
important. You're not important. Get used
to it.

Silence. Riggan seems devastated, and Sam can see that.

Sam (CONT'D)
Dad...

She looks at him sympathetically, but not knowing what to
say... exits.

After a moment Riggan gets up and heads for the trash can. He
digs out the roach, grabs some matches and lights it. Music
begins to sound. He inhales deeply and holds the smoke for a
few seconds and finally exhales. He coughs, tosses away the
joint and heads out of the kitchen. We follow him...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts his daughter Sam about her drug use, leading to a heated argument about their respective lives and ambitions. Sam criticizes Riggan's attempt to regain relevance through a Broadway play, highlighting his fear of irrelevance. Riggan is devastated by Sam's words and seeks solace in smoking marijuana.
Strengths
  • Intense and emotionally charged dialogue
  • Exploration of generational differences
  • Strong character development
Weaknesses
  • Limited plot progression

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 9

The scene is emotionally charged and explores important themes of relevance and fear of failure. The dialogue is intense and thought-provoking, and the conflict between the characters is well-developed.


Story Content

Concept: 8

The concept of generational differences and the pursuit of relevance is effectively explored through the conflict between Riggan and Sam.

Plot: 7

The plot of the scene revolves around the argument between Riggan and Sam, which reveals their conflicting perspectives and emotions.

Originality: 7

The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a father and daughter having a confrontation is familiar, the dialogue and the specific conflict between Riggan's need for validation and Sam's dismissal of his work add a fresh approach to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue contributes to the originality of the scene.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters of Riggan and Sam are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed.

Character Changes: 8

Both Riggan and Sam experience significant emotional changes during the scene, with Riggan feeling devastated by Sam's words and Sam realizing the impact of her criticism.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to feel relevant and important again. This reflects his deeper need for validation and recognition, as well as his fear of being forgotten and irrelevant.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to confront Sam about her drug use and protect his own reputation. This reflects the immediate challenge of maintaining his image and reputation as an actor.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict between Riggan and Sam is intense and emotionally charged, driving the scene forward and creating tension.

Opposition: 9

The opposition in this scene is strong, as Sam challenges Riggan's beliefs and values. The audience is unsure of how Riggan will respond to Sam's criticisms and accusations.

High Stakes: 8

The stakes are high for both Riggan and Sam, as their relationship and personal ambitions are at risk of being damaged.

Story Forward: 7

The scene provides insight into the emotional dynamics between Riggan and Sam, but does not significantly move the overall story forward.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it takes unexpected turns in the characters' dialogue and actions. The audience is unsure of how the confrontation between Riggan and Sam will unfold.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is between Riggan's belief in the importance of his work and Sam's belief that it is not important. This challenges Riggan's values and worldview, as he is forced to confront the possibility that his work may not have the significance he believes it does.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 10

The scene has a high emotional impact, with the argument between Riggan and Sam evoking strong emotions in both characters and the audience.

Dialogue: 10

The dialogue in the scene is intense, emotionally charged, and thought-provoking. It effectively conveys the conflict between Riggan and Sam.

Engagement: 9

This scene is engaging because it presents a conflict between the characters that is emotionally charged and explores deeper themes of validation and significance. The sharp and confrontational dialogue keeps the audience invested in the scene.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by gradually building tension and conflict. The rhythm of the dialogue and the pauses between lines create a sense of anticipation and emotional intensity.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses standard scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting.

Structure: 8

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a location and time description, followed by character actions and dialogue. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


Critique
  • The scene starts with Riggan entering the hallway, but it is not clear where he is coming from. It would be helpful to establish that he is coming from the stage where the light fell on Ralph.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Sam in the Green Room feels disconnected from the urgency and tension established in the previous scene. It would be more effective to have Riggan and Jake continue their conversation in the hallway.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Sam about the pot feels forced and out of place. It does not contribute to the main conflict between Riggan and Jake.
  • The dialogue between Riggan and Sam becomes repetitive and could be condensed to make the scene more concise and impactful.
  • The scene ends abruptly with Sam leaving and Riggan smoking a joint. It would be more effective to have a stronger closing moment that leaves the audience with a clear sense of what is to come next.
Suggestions
  • Establish that Riggan is coming from the stage where the light fell on Ralph at the beginning of the scene.
  • Move the conversation between Riggan and Jake to the hallway to maintain the urgency and tension.
  • Remove the conflict between Riggan and Sam about the pot to focus on the main conflict between Riggan and Jake.
  • Condense the dialogue between Riggan and Sam to make the scene more concise and impactful.
  • Create a stronger closing moment that leaves the audience with a clear sense of what is to come next.



Scene 16 -  Revelations and Reflections
21 INT. HALLWAY - THEATRE - CONTINUOUS 21

...as he slowly walks until he disappears into the darkness of
the corridor. We keep moving forward until we end up...
10/29/14 / 51.

A21 INT. BACKSTAGE - THEATRE - EVENING A21

...backstage. We are in the middle of the second preview. The
music continues, it belongs to the play.

Laura is by herself on stage performing the end of a scene. She
stands in the middle of a surrealistic forest set, at dusk.
There is fog, and trees. A strong, artificial wind blows
through Laura’s hair. Desolate music.

LAURA
(To the audience as soliloquy.)
In the days before Nick’s depression really
started to eat away at him, he had no idea
I was pregnant. And I never intended on
telling him. I guess we make choices in
life, and we choose to live with them. Or
not. I didn’t want that baby...

Three dancers on stage pass by in front of Laura. We follow
the dancers backstage where we find Mike and Lesley wearing
pajamas.
LAURA (O.S.) (CONT’D)
...Not because I didn’t love Nick. And not
because I didn’t love the-- The idea of
it. But because I just wasn’t ready to
love myself. There’s a certain distance to
it all now. A wistful distance.
Underscored by a gentle breeze and the
sound of the birds... laughing at the
whimsy of it all.

A stage hand helps Mike and Lesley into a double bed. The
camera slips under the covers with them and stays there.

MIKE
(Whispering.)
Hey, Les...

LESLEY
(Whispering.)
What?
MIKE
I'm hard.

LESLEY
No, you're not. It's just that sometimes
you don't consider other people's feelings.

MIKE
No. I'm hard. Feel.


(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 52.

LESLEY
Oh, you gotta be kidding.

The stage begins to revolve as we hear...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In the middle of a preview performance, Laura delivers a soliloquy about her past choices and her pregnancy. Meanwhile, Mike's inappropriate behavior causes chaos backstage, leading to a confrontation with Lesley. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, causing a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths
  • Emotional depth
  • Surreal elements
  • Revelation of pregnancy
Weaknesses
  • Minimal dialogue

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 8

The scene effectively combines surreal elements with emotional depth, creating a captivating and thought-provoking experience for the audience.


Story Content

Concept: 7

The concept of using a soliloquy to reveal a character's inner thoughts and emotions is well-executed and adds depth to the scene.

Plot: 7

The plot progresses as Laura's soliloquy provides insight into her past choices and the revelation of her pregnancy adds a new layer of complexity to the story.

Originality: 7

This scene has a moderate level of originality. While the situation of a character reflecting on past choices is not unique, the use of poetic dialogue and the surrealistic setting add freshness to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue contributes to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 8

The characters' emotions and conflicts are effectively portrayed, especially through Laura's soliloquy and Riggan's reaction to the pregnancy revelation.

Character Changes: 8

The characters experience significant emotional changes, particularly Riggan upon learning about the pregnancy.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to reflect on her past choices and come to terms with her feelings about her pregnancy. It reflects her deeper need for self-acceptance and her fear of not being ready to love herself.

External Goal: 6

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is not explicitly stated, but it can be inferred that she is performing her role in the play and trying to convey her character's emotions and thoughts to the audience.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 7

The conflict between Mike and Lesley adds tension and chaos to the scene, while the emotional conflicts within the characters are also present.

Opposition: 7

The opposition in this scene is moderate. The protagonist faces internal conflict and challenges her own beliefs and fears. The audience is unsure of how she will resolve her internal struggle.

High Stakes: 6

The stakes are raised with the revelation of Laura's pregnancy, adding complexity to the characters' relationships and personal journeys.

Story Forward: 7

The scene provides important revelations and developments, particularly with the pregnancy revelation, which moves the story forward.

Unpredictability: 6

This scene is somewhat unpredictable because it combines introspective moments with unexpected dialogue between characters. However, the overall direction of the scene is still somewhat predictable.

Philosophical Conflict: 7

There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between the protagonist's desire for self-acceptance and her fear of not being ready to love herself. This conflict challenges her beliefs about making choices in life and living with them.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 9

The scene evokes strong emotions through Laura's soliloquy and the mix of emotions and confusion caused by the pregnancy revelation.

Dialogue: 6

The dialogue is minimal in this scene, with the focus primarily on Laura's soliloquy. However, the confrontation between Mike and Lesley showcases some tense and impactful dialogue.

Engagement: 8

This scene is engaging because it combines introspective monologue with interactions between characters. The poetic language and surreal atmosphere also contribute to the engagement.

Pacing: 8

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by alternating between introspective moments and interactions between characters. It creates a rhythm that keeps the audience engaged.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatted correctly.

Structure: 9

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, introduces the protagonist's internal and external goals, and includes dialogue and interactions between characters.


Critique
  • The scene lacks visual elements and actions, making it feel stagnant and uninteresting.
  • The dialogue is mostly exposition and lacks depth or nuance.
  • The emotional tone is one-note and doesn't evolve throughout the scene.
  • The conflict between Riggan and Jake feels contrived and forced.
  • The scene doesn't advance the plot or character development in a meaningful way.
Suggestions
  • Consider adding visual elements or actions to make the scene more dynamic and engaging.
  • Rewrite the dialogue to add depth and nuance to the characters' motivations and emotions.
  • Explore different emotional tones throughout the scene to make it more dynamic.
  • Reconsider the conflict between Riggan and Jake and find a way to make it more organic and believable.
  • Make sure the scene advances the plot or character development in a meaningful way.



Scene 17 -  Chaos and Revelation
22 INT. STAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 22
...music through the transition. It remains dark.

MIKE
Let's really do this. Let's fuck.

LESLEY
Are you crazy? No.

Mike rolls on top of Lesley.

LESLEY (CONT'D)
Cut it out...

Mike continues to maneuver himself.

LESLEY (CONT'D)
I'm serious, Mike. Stop!

MIKE
I'm Mel. Not Mike. Mel.
A knock on a door.

RIGGAN (O.S.)
Terri! Terri!

A furious Lesley tries to reposition herself under Mike.

RIGGAN (O.S.) (CONT'D)
Terri! I know you're in there!

The knocking gets louder.

RIGGAN (O.S.) (CONT'D)
Terri???

Mike, lost in his libido, has begun to have sex with Lesley.
The camera comes out from under the covers and pans to Riggan
who stumbles into what is now the Motel Room set. He wears a
mustache and a long wig, that makes him look like a wild man.
He holds a gun in his right hand. A neon "Motel" sign is
illuminated. A clever effect of falling rain is visible behind
the set, accompanied by the appropriate sound effect. Riggan
is wet because of the "rain".

Lesley uses Riggan's entrance to escape from Mike.

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 53.

LESLEY
Ed!

Mike hops out of bed, unaware of the very noticeable erection
protruding underneath his pajama bottoms.

Some laughter from the audience.

LESLEY (CONT'D)
What are you doing here?
Lesley doesn't understand the audience response, until she
notices the erection herself.

RIGGAN
(To Lesley.)
Why? I need you to tell me why. I lived for
you. I worshipped you...

MIKE
Listen Ed, I know this is hard but--
More laughter. Riggan is disturbed, but he continues...

RIGGAN
(to Mike)
Fuck you. Shut up. Fuck you.

He shoves Mike violently to the floor.

LESLEY
Eddie! Please!

Riggan points the gun at Mike's head.

RIGGAN
What's wrong with me? Why do I end up
having to beg people to love me?

LESLEY
Ed. Eddie. Please... Give me the gun.
She begins to cry. Her performance is beautiful.

LESLEY (CONT'D)
Just look at me. I was drowning. I
was not capable of-- You deserve to
be loved. You do.

RIGGAN
I just wanted to be what you wanted.
(Beat.)
Now I spend every fucking minute praying to
be someone else. Someone I'm not. Anyone...

(CONTINUED)
10/29/14 / 54.

MIKE
Put down the gun, Ed. She just doesn't love
you anymore.

The audience is silent.

RIGGAN
(A sad smile.)
You don't, do you?

LESLEY
(With sympathy.)
No...

RIGGAN
And you never will...

LESLEY
I'm sorry.

RIGGAN
(A revelation.)
I don't exist. I'm not even here. I don't
exist. None of this matters.

Riggan points the gun at Lesley. Then at Mike. Finally, he puts
the gun to his own head and pulls the trigger. PUM! And with the
explosion, a fake blood mechanism splatters brains onto the
stage. Riggan drops to the floor.

A blackout. The audience applauds politely. The curtain falls.
We follow Riggan off stage and into...

23 INT. BACKSTAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 23
...the wings, where Annie immediately helps him remove the
bloody and wet wig with the propeller mechanism. Laura waits
next to them for their bows. Meanwhile, a stage hand crosses
behind them, and we follow him as he goes on stage to...
Genres: ["Drama"]

Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
Strengths "The scene effectively captures the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior, and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a surprising twist to the story. The performances and dialogue are strong, conveying the intensity of the situation."
Weaknesses "One potential weakness of the scene is the explicit sexual content, which may be uncomfortable for some viewers. Additionally, the scene may feel chaotic and overwhelming for some audience members."

Ratings
Overall

Overall: 9

The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior, and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a surprising twist to the story, creating a mix of emotions and confusion. The dialogue and performances are strong, capturing the intensity of the situation.


Story Content

Concept: 8

The concept of chaos and revelation is well-executed in this scene. The chaotic nature of Mike's behavior and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy create tension and emotional impact.

Plot: 8

The plot of the scene revolves around the chaos caused by Mike's behavior and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy. It effectively advances the story and adds complexity to the characters' relationships.

Originality: 9

The level of originality in this scene is high. The situation of a confrontation between a protagonist and his lover's new partner is familiar, but the use of a theater stage as the setting and the blending of reality and performance adds a fresh and unique twist. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


Character Development

Characters: 9

The characters' emotions and reactions are well-portrayed in this scene. Mike's inappropriate behavior and Lesley's confrontation showcase their conflicting personalities. Laura's revelation adds depth to her character, and Riggan's devastation and emotional turmoil are palpable.

Character Changes: 8

The characters undergo some changes in this scene. Lesley stands up to Mike and leaves, showing her strength and determination. Riggan experiences a revelation about his own existence and struggles with his emotions.

Internal Goal: 8

The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to understand why he is not loved and to come to terms with his own existence. It reflects his deeper need for validation and his fear of being alone and unloved.

External Goal: 7

The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to confront his lover and her new partner. It reflects the immediate circumstances of his failed relationship and his desire for closure.


Scene Elements

Conflict Level: 9

The conflict in this scene is high, with Lesley confronting Mike about his behavior and Riggan's emotional turmoil. The chaos and tension created by these conflicts drive the scene forward.

Opposition: 8

The opposition in this scene is strong, as the protagonist confronts his lover and her new partner. The audience is unsure of how the confrontation will go and there is a sense of conflict and tension.

High Stakes: 8

The stakes are high in this scene as the chaos caused by Mike's behavior threatens the success of the Broadway production. Additionally, the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds personal stakes for the characters.

Story Forward: 9

The scene moves the story forward by revealing Laura's pregnancy, which has the potential to impact the characters' relationships and the overall plot. It also deepens the emotional turmoil experienced by Riggan.

Unpredictability: 7

This scene is unpredictable because it includes unexpected twists, such as the protagonist's transformation into a wild man and the use of a fake blood mechanism. The audience is kept on their toes and unsure of what will happen next.

Philosophical Conflict: 9

The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the protagonist's struggle with his own identity and the meaning of his existence. It challenges his beliefs about love, self-worth, and the nature of reality.


Audience Engagement

Emotional Impact: 10

The scene has a high emotional impact, with the characters experiencing frustration, shock, devastation, and confusion. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an unexpected layer of emotion to the scene.

Dialogue: 8

The dialogue in this scene effectively conveys the characters' emotions and motivations. The confrontations between Lesley and Mike, as well as Riggan's emotional outburst, are particularly impactful.

Engagement: 8

This scene is engaging because it contains a dramatic confrontation, emotional dialogue, and a blend of reality and performance. The audience is drawn into the characters' struggles and the tension of the scene.

Pacing: 9

The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by building tension and suspense. The rhythm of the dialogue and the use of pauses and action descriptions create a sense of urgency and emotional intensity.


Technical Aspect

Formatting: 9

The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes clear scene headings, character names, dialogue, and action descriptions. The use of capitalization and punctuation is consistent and appropriate.

Structure: 9

The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a clear setting and introduces the characters and their goals. The conflict escalates and reaches a climax, followed by a resolution and a transition to the next scene.


Critique
  • This JSON response is for a different scene than the one provided in the prompt.
  • The scene provided in the prompt is from the movie 'Birdman', while the scene in the script is from an unknown source.
  • Please provide the correct scene for review.
Suggestions



    Scene 18 -  Chaos Backstage
    24 INT. STAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 24

    ...reposition some scenery for the curtain call. The camera
    carries us to the other side of the stage, where Mike and Lesley
    are in a heated exchange...

    MIKE
    Just, keep your voice down...

    LESLEY
    (Furious.)
    You have to be shitting me. You can't get it
    up in six months...
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 55.
    LESLEY (CONT'D)
    (She starts hitting him.)
    ...and now you try to fuck me in front of
    eight hundred strangers???

    MIKE
    What do you want from me? I have to feel it.
    You know that. I told you that from the--

    LESLEY
    Oh, fuck you...
    Music begins and the curtain rises. The audience applauds as
    Lesley and Mike stride onto the stage and take their bows,
    smiles plastered on their faces.

    MIKE
    ...I was in the moment...

    LESLEY
    I told you to stop. You fucking animal.
    MIKE
    But... You were incredible.

    LESLEY
    What is wrong with you?

    Lesley starts back for the wings, and Mike follows her. In the
    background we see Riggan and Laura enter from the other side to
    take their bows.

    MIKE
    Listen I’m sorry, alright, I--

    LESLEY
    I want your shit out of the apartment.

    They go back on stage and join Riggan and Laura for the company
    bow.

    MIKE
    Can we--

    LESLEY
    No we can't. Maybe up here you’re Mr. Truth,
    Mike. But in the real world, where it counts,
    you're a fraud. How's that for truth? You...
    dick.

    Lesley storms off, leaving Mike and a confused Riggan on stage.
    Laura chases her off and straight into...
    10/29/14 / 56.

    25 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 25

    ...the hallway.

    LAURA
    What's going on?

    LESLEY
    He's an asshole.

    LAURA
    What did he do now?
    LESLEY
    Oh, nothing. He just tried to fuck me in
    front of a full house.

    LAURA
    Oh, my God...

    LESLEY
    Right?
    LAURA
    That’s kind of hot.

    She follows Lesley into...

    26 26
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In the costume department of the theater, Mike Shiner's inappropriate behavior causes chaos and frustration. Lesley confronts Mike about his behavior and asks him not to ruin their Broadway production. Mike tries to make amends, but Lesley is still upset and leaves. The scene ends with Larry returning with clothes for Mike. Amidst the chaos, Laura reveals to Riggan that she is pregnant, leading to a mix of emotions and confusion.
    Strengths "The chaotic and tense atmosphere, the strong emotions portrayed by the characters, and the unexpected revelation of Laura's pregnancy."
    Weaknesses "The scene could benefit from further development of the characters' emotions and motivations."

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 8

    The scene effectively portrays the chaos and frustration caused by Mike's behavior, and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an unexpected twist. However, the scene could benefit from further development of the characters' emotions and motivations.


    Story Content

    Concept: 7

    The concept of chaos and conflict backstage in a theater production is well-executed in this scene. The inappropriate behavior of Mike Shiner adds an element of unpredictability and tension.

    Plot: 7

    The plot of the scene revolves around the chaos caused by Mike's behavior and the confrontation between Lesley and Mike. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a surprising twist to the plot.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a heated argument between two characters is familiar, the specific dialogue and the exploration of the conflict between truth and performance add a fresh approach to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue contributes to the originality of the scene.


    Character Development

    Characters: 7

    The characters' emotions and reactions are well-portrayed in the scene. Lesley's anger and frustration, Mike's attempts to make amends, and Laura's mix of emotions contribute to the overall tension.

    Character Changes: 7

    Lesley experiences a change in her perception of Mike, realizing his true nature. Laura's revelation of her pregnancy also leads to a shift in the dynamics between her and Riggan.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to defend himself and his actions to Lesley. This reflects his need for validation and his fear of being seen as a fraud.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to reconcile with Lesley and salvage their relationship. This reflects the immediate challenge of their heated argument and the potential consequences of their actions on their personal lives and careers.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Lesley and Mike is intense and fuels the chaos in the scene. The conflict between Laura and Riggan regarding her pregnancy adds another layer of tension.

    Opposition: 9

    The opposition in this scene is strong as Lesley confronts the protagonist and challenges his actions. The audience is unsure of how the protagonist will respond and whether he will be able to reconcile with Lesley.

    High Stakes: 8

    The stakes are high in this scene as the chaos and inappropriate behavior threaten the success of the Broadway production. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy also raises the stakes for Riggan and the other characters.

    Story Forward: 7

    The scene moves the story forward by revealing Laura's pregnancy, which has the potential to impact the relationships and dynamics of the characters.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it presents unexpected actions and reactions from the characters. The audience is unsure of how the conflict will be resolved and what the consequences will be.

    Philosophical Conflict: 9

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between the protagonist's belief in the importance of being in the moment as an actor and Lesley's belief that his actions are unacceptable in the real world. This challenges the protagonist's values and worldview as an actor.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 8

    The scene evokes strong emotions, including frustration, anger, confusion, and surprise. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds an emotional complexity to the scene.

    Dialogue: 7

    The dialogue effectively conveys the characters' emotions and motivations. The heated exchange between Lesley and Mike and the revelation of Laura's pregnancy are particularly impactful.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it presents a conflict between the characters that is emotionally charged and creates tension. The dialogue and actions of the characters keep the audience invested in the scene.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by creating a sense of urgency and intensity. The quick back-and-forth dialogue and the physical actions of the characters maintain a steady rhythm.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by the characters' dialogue and actions, and ends with a transition to the next scene.


    Critique
    • The scene feels disconnected from the previous scene and doesn't add much to the overall plot.
    • The dialogue between Lesley and Mike feels forced and cliché.
    • The actions of the characters are not clearly motivated or explained.
    • The visual elements of the scene are not particularly interesting or engaging.
    • The scene lacks a clear resolution or conclusion.
    Suggestions
    • Consider cutting this scene or finding a way to make it more relevant to the overall plot.
    • Rewrite the dialogue between Lesley and Mike to make it more natural and believable.
    • Provide more context and motivation for the actions of the characters.
    • Add more visual interest to the scene, such as interesting camera angles or lighting.
    • Give the scene a clearer resolution or conclusion to make it feel more satisfying.



    Scene 19 -  Emotional Confrontation and Revelation
    INT. LESLEY AND LAURA'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS
    ...the dressing room and closes the door. Lesley proceeds to
    smash everything on her dressing table. Then she looks in the
    mirror holding a hairbrush.

    LESLEY
    Why don't I have any self-respect?

    LAURA
    You're an actress, honey.

    Lesley begins to cry. Laura hugs her.
    LESLEY
    I’m pathetic. You know, I’ve dreamt of
    being a Broadway actress since I was a
    little kid. And now I’m here. And I’m not a
    Broadway actress. I’m still just a little
    kid. And I keep waiting for someone to tell
    me I made it.

    LAURA
    (Hiding how moved she is.)
    Hey. You made it.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 57.

    LESLEY
    I did?

    LAURA
    Sadly, it was with Mike Shiner, on a fake
    motel bed, in front of--

    LESLEY
    (A little laugh.)
    Shut. Up.
    Riggan steps into the doorway and sees Laura hugging Lesley.

    RIGGAN
    Is she okay?

    LAURA
    She's gonna be fine.

    Riggan enters gingerly and walks up to Lesley.
    RIGGAN
    None of this is your fault.
    (Into her eyes.)
    You're beautiful. And talented. And I'm
    lucky to have you. Okay?

    LESLEY
    Okay.

    RIGGAN
    Okay.

    Riggan leaves the room. Laura leans on the makeup table.

    LESLEY
    That was very sweet.

    LAURA
    Yeah.
    Laura is suddenly teary.

    LESLEY
    What's wrong?

    A beat.

    LAURA
    (Smiling.)
    Nothing. Two years, he's never said
    anything like that to me.



    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 58.

    LESLEY
    (Into her eyes.)
    Hey. You're smart. And beautiful. And
    talented. And I'm lucky to have you. Okay?

    LAURA
    We’re gross.

    LESLEY
    We are.
    Laura smiles and caresses Lesley’s hand. They look at each
    other. Then Laura leans forward, close to Lesley’s face...

    LESLEY (CONT’D)
    (Nervous.)
    What are you doing?

    LAURA
    Nothing.
    Laura kisses Lesley tenderly on the lips. Lesley seems
    confused. A few seconds of silence. Then...

    LESLEY
    Do it again.

    Laura kisses her again. A knock at the door. They separate.
    Mike opens the door holding the prop gun.

    MIKE
    (To Lesley.)
    Can we talk about this like two--

    Lesley hurls the hair brush at his head.

    LESLEY
    FUCK YOU!!!

    MIKE
    Okay, well, you're not ready.
    Mike points the prop gun at her, pretends to fire and...

    MIKE (CONT’D)
    That was hot.

    He exits the room. We follow him...

    27 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 27
    ...down the hallway up to Riggan's dressing room. Riggan sits
    at his table, picking the brains out of his hair.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 59.

    MIKE
    (Holding the gun.)
    Your gun is ridiculous. It looks like a
    plastic toy. And it still has the red plug
    in the barrel.
    (Shows the plug.)
    You look like a seven year old when
    you’re holding it. I'm not threatened
    by it at all.

    He tosses the gun onto Riggan's table.
    MIKE (CONT’D)
    Have some self respect and get a new one.
    (Takes a step then turns.)
    That was a fun crowd, huh?

    We follow Mike to...

    28 INT. STAIRS - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 28
    ...the stairs. He climbs them as he lights a cigarette. He goes
    through a metal door that takes him out onto...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Lesley and Laura have a heartfelt conversation in their dressing room. Lesley expresses her insecurities about not achieving her dreams of being a Broadway actress, and Laura reassures her. They share a tender moment and kiss. Mike interrupts their moment, causing Lesley to throw a hairbrush at him in anger. Meanwhile, Riggan is seen picking the brains out of his hair in his dressing room, and Mike criticizes his prop gun. The scene ends with Mike leaving the theater.
    Strengths "Strong emotional moments, authentic character development, tension and conflict"
    Weaknesses "Limited progression of the overall plot"

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is emotionally charged and provides significant character development for Lesley and Laura. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy adds a layer of complexity to the story. The chaotic and intense tone keeps the audience engaged.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of exploring the insecurities and dreams of the characters is well-executed. The scene also introduces the theme of self-respect and the pursuit of success in the theater industry.

    Plot: 7

    The plot progresses with the revelation of Laura's pregnancy, which adds a new dynamic to the story. However, the focus of the scene is more on character development and emotional moments rather than advancing the overall plot.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of actors struggling with self-doubt and validation is familiar, the authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds a fresh and realistic approach.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The scene provides significant development for Lesley and Laura. Lesley's insecurities and vulnerability are explored, while Laura's support and affection towards Lesley are showcased. The characters feel authentic and relatable.

    Character Changes: 8

    Lesley experiences a shift in her perspective as Laura reassures her and expresses her love and support. This moment of vulnerability and connection has the potential to impact Lesley's character arc.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to find self-respect and validation as an actress. This reflects her deeper need for validation and her fear of not being good enough.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is not clearly defined, but it can be inferred that she wants to succeed as a Broadway actress and be recognized for her talent.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 8

    The conflict arises from Lesley's frustration with her career and Mike's inappropriate behavior. The confrontation between Lesley and Mike adds tension to the scene.

    Opposition: 4

    The opposition in this scene is relatively weak, as there are no significant obstacles or conflicts that the protagonist needs to overcome. The audience is not left in suspense about the outcome.

    High Stakes: 7

    The stakes are high for Lesley, who is struggling with her career and self-worth. The revelation of Laura's pregnancy also raises the stakes for the characters involved.

    Story Forward: 6

    The scene introduces the revelation of Laura's pregnancy, which adds a new layer to the story. However, the focus is more on character development and emotional moments rather than advancing the overall plot.

    Unpredictability: 5

    This scene is somewhat unpredictable because it includes unexpected moments of vulnerability and intimacy between the characters. However, the overall plot and character dynamics are relatively predictable.

    Philosophical Conflict: 0

    There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 9

    The scene evokes strong emotions through Lesley's vulnerability, Laura's support, and the chaotic atmosphere. The tender moment between Lesley and Laura is particularly moving.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue effectively conveys the emotions and thoughts of the characters. The conversation between Lesley and Laura is heartfelt and impactful. The dialogue between Mike and Lesley adds tension and conflict to the scene.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it explores the emotional struggles of the characters and creates a sense of intimacy and vulnerability. The dialogue and character interactions draw the audience in and create an emotional connection.

    Pacing: 7

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing for moments of emotional intensity and reflection. It balances dialogue and action to create a rhythm that keeps the audience engaged.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 8

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with proper indentation, dialogue formatting, and scene descriptions.

    Structure: 7

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre, with clear scene headings, character actions, and dialogue.


    Critique
    • The scene could benefit from more clarity in terms of the characters' motivations and emotions. For example, it is not clear why Laura kisses Lesley and how Lesley feels about it. This could be explored further to add depth to their relationship.
    • The dialogue between Lesley and Laura feels a bit forced and unnatural. It could be improved by making it more authentic and reflective of how people actually speak.
    • The scene could benefit from more visual elements to enhance the emotional impact. For example, showing Lesley smashing things on her dressing table could add to the tension and drama of the scene.
    • The conflict between Lesley and Mike feels a bit contrived and could be developed further to make it more compelling.
    • The scene ends somewhat abruptly and could benefit from a clearer resolution or transition to the next scene.
    Suggestions
    • Consider adding more backstory or context to the relationship between Laura and Lesley to make their interactions more meaningful.
    • Work on refining the dialogue to make it more natural and authentic.
    • Think about ways to visually enhance the emotional impact of the scene, such as through lighting or camera angles.
    • Develop the conflict between Lesley and Mike further to make it more engaging for the audience.
    • Consider adding a clearer resolution or transition to the next scene to improve the flow of the story.



    Scene 20 -  Rooftop Revelation
    29 EXT. ROOFTOP - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 29

    ...a rooftop. The Marquis' of the other theaters glowing with
    the street lamps, a classic Broadway view.

    Mike is surprised to find Sam sitting on the cornice of the
    building, a good fifty feet above 45th street. He goes next to
    her, looking down at the street.

    MIKE
    I don't think it's high enough.

    Sam turns to him, uncomfortable by his presence.
    SAM
    Me neither.

    MIKE
    So, what are you doing up here?

    SAM
    (Hesitant.)
    Adrenaline. Just came out of rehab. Closest
    I get to a drug.

    MIKE
    You were in rehab?


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 60.

    SAM
    (Distant.)
    Yeah.

    MIKE
    Cool.

    SAM
    It wasn't all Dr. Drew or anything, but
    that dude from American Pie was there.
    A VOICE
    (From the street below.)
    Juuump!

    SAM
    (Calling down.)
    Eat me!

    A VOICE
    Okay. Jump on my face!
    SAM
    (To Mike.)
    I love this city.

    MIKE
    Yeah.

    SAM
    (Casually.)
    Why do you act like a dick all the time? Do
    you just do it to antagonize people?

    MIKE
    Maybe...

    Sam turns and faces Mike.

    SAM
    You really don't give a shit if people like
    you or not...

    MIKE
    Not really.

    SAM
    (More comfortable.)
    God, that's cool.

    MIKE
    Is it...?

    Mike leans on the railing, looking down at the street. For a
    moment, he is somewhere else...
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 61.

    SAM
    Hey.
    (Mike doesn't respond. She pushes
    him.)
    Hey...

    MIKE
    What?

    SAM
    Let's play a game.
    MIKE
    A game?

    SAM
    Yeah.

    MIKE
    What are you, eight?
    SAM
    What are you, seventy-eight? Truth or
    dare...?

    MIKE
    You gotta be--

    SAM
    Truth or dare?

    He looks at her, intrigued.

    MIKE
    Truth.

    SAM
    The first time we met, you made a comment about
    my ass. Why'd you do it?

    MIKE
    Because you have a great ass, and I noticed
    it. So, I said it.
    (A beat.)
    Truth or dare?

    SAM
    Dare.

    MIKE
    Really...

    SAM
    Uh-huh.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 62.

    A moment of tension.

    MIKE
    (Looking at the street.)
    There’s a bald guy about to walk by down
    there. Spit on his head.

    SAM
    No!

    MIKE
    You said dare.

    SAM
    Truth.

    MIKE
    Too late.

    She stares into Mike's eyes, knowing she's being tested. She
    leans over the railing and spits down toward the street.
    SAM
    Happy?

    MAN (O.C.)
    (From the street)
    Fuck you!

    Sam laughs. Mike smiles at her carefree laugh. It could be the
    first time we've seen a genuine smile from him.

    SAM
    Truth or dare?

    MIKE
    Truth.

    SAM
    You're boring.
    MIKE
    Truth.

    She stares him down.

    SAM
    (Nervous, pretending.)
    Do you want to fool around with me?

    A pause.

    MIKE
    No.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 63.

    SAM
    (Taken aback.)
    Really? Why not?

    MIKE
    That's a second question.

    SAM
    It's a second part.

    A pause.
    MIKE
    I'd be afraid I couldn't get it up.

    Impressed with his honesty.

    SAM
    That didn't seem to be a problem for you on
    stage.
    MIKE
    Nothing’s a problem for me on stage.

    SAM
    I wanna ask another question...

    MIKE
    You just asked--

    SAM
    One more.

    MIKE
    Go 'head.

    SAM
    If you weren't afraid. What would you want
    to do to me?

    He carefully considers it, then moves his face close to hers.
    MIKE
    I would want to pull the eyes out of your
    head...

    SAM
    ...That's sweet...

    MIKE
    ...And stick them in my skull, and then
    look out at this street and see it the way
    I saw it when I was your age.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 64.

    Mike turns and stares out at the street once more. Sam stares
    at the mystery that is Mike.

    SAM
    G'night, Mike.

    She walks away and into the building, never looking back.

    A29 A29

    Mike stares out into the night. We move to his POV. The street.
    Night turns to day. Pedestrians begin to walk below.


    B29 B29

    We crawl down the wall until we arrive at Riggan's dressing
    room window. We push in to find...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary On a rooftop, Mike and Sam have a deep conversation about their personal struggles and insecurities. They play a game of truth or dare, revealing their vulnerabilities and fears. The scene ends with Sam walking away, leaving Mike to contemplate his emotions.
    Strengths "Strong emotional impact, authentic dialogue, compelling character development"
    Weaknesses "Limited external action, lack of visual variety"

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 8

    The scene effectively conveys the emotional turmoil of the characters and creates tension through the game of truth or dare. The rooftop setting adds visual interest and symbolism.


    Story Content

    Concept: 7

    The concept of two characters opening up to each other on a rooftop creates a sense of intimacy and vulnerability.

    Plot: 7

    The plot of the scene revolves around the conversation between Mike and Sam, revealing their inner struggles and fears.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the rooftop setting and dialogue between characters are familiar elements, the specific dynamics and emotional depth of the scene add a fresh approach. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue contributes to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters of Mike and Sam are well-developed and their emotional journey is compelling.

    Character Changes: 8

    Both Mike and Sam experience personal growth and vulnerability during the scene.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to connect with Sam and understand her better. This reflects his deeper need for human connection and his desire to break through his own emotional barriers.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is not clearly defined. It seems to be more focused on the internal conflict and relationship between the characters.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 6

    The conflict in the scene arises from the characters' insecurities and their struggle to open up to each other.

    Opposition: 6

    The opposition in this scene is not particularly strong. There are moments of tension and conflict, but they are more focused on the internal dynamics between the characters rather than external obstacles.

    High Stakes: 6

    The high stakes in the scene come from the characters' emotional vulnerability and the risk of rejection.

    Story Forward: 7

    The scene deepens the emotional journey of the characters and adds complexity to their relationships.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it subverts expectations by not clearly defining the external goal and by presenting unexpected moments of vulnerability and honesty between the characters.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene. It challenges the protagonist's belief in the importance of being liked by others and his disregard for societal norms. Sam's question about why he acts like a dick challenges his values and worldview.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 9

    The scene evokes strong emotions through the characters' raw and honest conversation.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue is authentic and reveals the inner thoughts and emotions of the characters.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it presents a unique and intriguing dynamic between the characters. The witty dialogue and emotional depth keep the audience invested in the scene.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing moments of tension and introspection to breathe, while also maintaining a steady rhythm in the dialogue.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It establishes the setting, introduces the characters, and progresses the dialogue in a logical and engaging manner.


    Critique
    • The scene lacks clear direction and purpose. It is unclear why Mike and Sam are on the rooftop and what their conversation is meant to achieve.
    • The dialogue feels forced and unnatural at times, particularly in the truth or dare game. The questions and responses do not flow organically and the dialogue lacks depth.
    • The emotional tone of the scene is inconsistent. It starts off tense and introspective, but then transitions into a playful game without a clear reason for the shift.
    • The visual elements and actions in the scene are limited. There is a missed opportunity to use the rooftop setting to create a visually striking and memorable scene.
    • The ending of the scene feels abrupt and unresolved. It leaves the reader wanting more closure or a clearer resolution to the conflict between Mike and Sam.
    Suggestions
    • Clarify the purpose and direction of the scene. What is the intended outcome or impact of the conversation between Mike and Sam?
    • Revise the dialogue to make it more natural and meaningful. Focus on creating authentic and engaging exchanges between the characters.
    • Ensure consistency in the emotional tone of the scene. If the intention is to have a tense and introspective scene, maintain that tone throughout.
    • Take advantage of the rooftop setting to create visually striking moments. Use the location to enhance the atmosphere and add depth to the scene.
    • Consider revising the ending to provide more closure or resolution to the conflict between Mike and Sam. This will give the scene a stronger sense of purpose and impact.



    Scene 21 -  Revelations and Betrayal
    30 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - DAY 30
    ...Riggan siting with his feet on the window frame, staring at
    a manila envelope in his hands that reads... "R, MALIBU
    REFINANCE DOCS. SIGN AND SEND ASAP. J." Riggan sighs and props
    the letter up against the mirror.

    With a soft knock, Laura enters. She stands in the doorway with
    an odd expression on her face.

    RIGGAN
    What now?
    Laura lays the Arts section of the New York Times down in front
    of Riggan.

    LAURA
    Don't kill the messenger.

    Riggan picks up the paper. His expression immediately changes.
    Laura watches him sympathetically.

    LAURA (CONT'D)
    He's an asshole.

    Now we see the cover of the Arts section. There is a picture
    of Mike lounging on a black sofa, his bare feet on a table as
    he sips a glass of wine. The Title of the article reads...
    "CARVING OUT HIS PLACE IN THEATER HISTORY. Shiner says Raymond
    Carver is the reason he became an actor." Riggan involuntarily
    squeezes the paper as he reads on, filling with rage.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    He’s fooling you.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 65.

    RIGGAN
    Shut up.

    LAURA
    (Confused.)
    I didn't say anything.

    RIGGAN
    Fuck. This is it?
    (He passes a few pages.)
    This can't be it.
    LAURA
    Page twelve.

    Riggan searches desperately for page twelve. When he gets
    there, he finds a huge ad of the new Toyota Camry that almost
    fills the entire page, and down in the left corner a tiny
    press release with the title:

    "From Birdman to Carver: An aging Action Hero Grasps for His
    Youth."

    RIGGAN
    (Reading.)
    "Riggan Thompson, better known as the face of
    the Birdman films, tries not to lay an egg on
    Broadway..."
    (Flipping pages.)
    Where's the rest of it?

    LAURA
    There is no rest of it.

    RIGGAN
    They didn’t use the photo I sent them.

    LAURA
    What photo?

    RIGGAN
    The one you liked. The one you said
    I look like a young Jack Nicholson.

    LAURA
    (She lights a candle.)
    Don't worry about it. Someone'll be using
    that to pick up dog shit tomorrow.

    RIGGAN
    How can you be so calm about this?

    LAURA
    What are my other choices?

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 66.

    RIGGAN
    Aren't you scared at all?

    LAURA
    About what?

    RIGGAN
    About being humiliated out there.

    LAURA
    It won't be the first time I've been
    humiliated.

    RIGGAN
    I bet it won't.

    Laura looks at him with fire in her eyes.

    LAURA
    You're an asshole.
    She charges to the door and is about to leave when she turns
    back to Riggan...

    LAURA (CONT'D)
    By the way... I'm not pregnant. So there's
    one thing you don’t have to worry about.

    She leaves, slamming the door behind her.

    Riggan remains still. Mike seems to be smirking at him right
    through the cover of the Arts section...

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    That pretentious, little, theater fuck is
    stealing your thunder.

    Riggan charges out of the room and into...

    31 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 31

    ...the hallway. He walks to Mike's dressing room, finds the
    door half opened and enters...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In Riggan's dressing room, Laura shows him an article featuring Mike, which infuriates Riggan. Laura tries to calm him down and reveals that she is not pregnant. Riggan confronts Mike in his dressing room.
    Strengths
    • Strong emotional impact
    • Well-developed characters
    • Effective dialogue
    Weaknesses
    • Limited exploration of theme

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 8

    The scene effectively conveys the frustration and anger of Riggan upon seeing the article about Mike. The revelation about Laura not being pregnant adds a layer of relief and confusion. The scene sets up a confrontation between Riggan and Mike, creating anticipation for the next scene.


    Story Content

    Concept: 7

    The concept of exploring personal insecurities and the impact of media portrayal is well-executed in this scene.

    Plot: 8

    The plot progresses as Riggan's anger towards Mike intensifies and he confronts him in the next scene.

    Originality: 7

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a protagonist facing negative press and a rival is familiar, the specific details and dialogue add freshness to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and motivations are well-developed and drive the scene forward.

    Character Changes: 7

    Riggan experiences a range of emotions and confronts Mike, showing a change in his behavior.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to deal with the negative press and criticism he is receiving. This reflects his deeper need for validation and success, as well as his fear of failure and humiliation.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to confront Mike, who is stealing his thunder in the theater. This reflects the immediate challenge he is facing in maintaining his reputation and success.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 8

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike is intense and sets up a confrontation in the next scene.

    Opposition: 7

    The opposition in this scene is strong as the protagonist faces challenges from negative press and a rival actor. The audience is unsure of how Riggan will overcome these obstacles.

    High Stakes: 7

    The stakes are high for Riggan as his reputation is at risk due to the article about Mike.

    Story Forward: 8

    The scene moves the story forward by setting up a confrontation between Riggan and Mike.

    Unpredictability: 6

    This scene is unpredictable because it introduces unexpected challenges and conflicts for the protagonist. The audience is unsure of how Riggan will react and what actions he will take.

    Philosophical Conflict: 6

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between Riggan's desire for artistic integrity and the pressure to conform to commercial success. This challenges his beliefs and values as an actor.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 9

    The scene evokes strong emotions, including frustration, anger, relief, and confusion.

    Dialogue: 7

    The dialogue effectively conveys the characters' emotions and reveals important information.

    Engagement: 8

    This scene is engaging because it presents a conflict and raises questions about the protagonist's future. The dialogue and actions of the characters create tension and keep the audience invested in the outcome.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by gradually building tension and suspense. The rhythm of the dialogue and actions keeps the scene engaging and propels the story forward.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes clear scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 9

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It establishes the setting, introduces conflict, and builds tension towards the protagonist's confrontation with Mike.


    Critique
    • The scene feels disconnected from the rest of the story and doesn't advance the plot in a significant way.
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Laura feels forced and unnatural.
    • The conflict between Riggan and his own insecurities is not as compelling as the conflicts between characters in previous scenes.
    • The visual elements in the scene are limited and don't add much to the story.
    • The scene could benefit from more action or movement to break up the static nature of the conversation.
    Suggestions
    • Consider cutting this scene or finding a way to tie it more closely to the main plot.
    • Work on making the dialogue between Riggan and Laura more natural and believable.
    • Explore other conflicts or tensions that could arise in this scene to make it more engaging.
    • Add more visual elements or actions to make the scene more dynamic.
    • Consider adding a twist or surprise to the scene to keep the audience engaged.



    Scene 22 -  Confrontation and Revelation
    32 INT. MIKE'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 32

    ...discovering Mike lying in a sun bed. His arm is sticking
    out of it, holding on to a copy of Borges's 'Labyrinths'.

    Riggan yanks the sun bed open. Mike is asleep, wearing tiny
    sun goggles. Riggan slams the lid down on him.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 67.

    MIKE
    What the fuck is going on!

    RIGGAN
    Get up!

    MIKE
    Back away.

    RIGGAN
    Get up.
    Riggan slaps Mike on the arm.

    MIKE
    Ow, fuck that hurts!

    RIGGAN
    So, Carver is the reason you became an
    actor?
    MIKE
    What?

    RIGGAN
    This is my play! I did the work. I raised the
    money. I arrange the press.

    MIKE
    They called me for an interview. I said-- I
    don't know, I said the first thing that
    came to mind. Jesus, we got the cover of
    the Arts section!

    RIGGAN
    You said the first-- Fuck the Arts section.
    The first thing that came to mind? Right.
    Cause that's you. Mr. Natural. Mr. Fuck the
    scene, just stare at my massive hard-on.
    Because that's the truth of the moment.
    MIKE
    You think it looked massive?

    RIGGAN
    Shut up. Shut the fuck up. You don't get
    hard on my stage unless I tell you to.

    MIKE
    Your stage? This stage belonged to a lot of
    great actor's, pal. But you are not one of
    them.

    Mike storms out of the room. Riggan follows him into...
    10/29/14 / 68.

    33 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 33

    ...the hallway. He slaps Mike on his sun burned back.

    RIGGAN
    So, you wrote your own lines?

    He slaps him again.

    MIKE
    Ow. Fuck. Yes I did.

    RIGGAN
    You changed a few words, and mumbled a
    little, you self absorbed prick.

    MIKE
    Look who's talking...

    RIGGAN
    Let me tell you something, you spiteful
    nobody piece of shit.
    MIKE
    Nobody? My hard-on has already fifty
    thousand views on youtube.

    RIGGAN
    Fifty thousand views? A cat playing with
    a dildo has more than that.

    MIKE
    I don't care.

    RIGGAN
    Yes you do.
    (Beat.)
    Everybody says: "Mike is so honest". (Smacks
    him.) "So truthful". (Smacks him again.)

    MIKE
    (Like a child.)
    Ouch. Fuuuuuck. Cut the shit!
    Riggan corners Mike against the wall.

    RIGGAN
    You said in the interview that your father
    was a drunk, like Carver. Is that true
    Mike? Is it really true?

    Riggan stares intensely into Mike's eyes. Mike looks away.



    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 69.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    Because my father was. My father was a mean
    fucking drunk. Beat the shit out of us. But
    we were okay with the beatings. You know
    why? Because at least when he was beating
    us, he wasn't thinking about taking us out
    to his tool shed...

    Mike's expression changes.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    That sonofabitch would smile and say, "Do
    you want to kneel down and unbuckle my
    belt? Or do you want me to take it off and
    use it?" I learned how to make myself numb.
    But my sister-- (Holding back tears.) My
    little sister...

    Riggan can't go on. Mike is horrified.

    MIKE
    Jesus, Riggan. I'm really sorry. I
    didn't-- That's fucking horrible...

    RIGGAN
    (Crazy smile.)
    Yeah. It's also not true. See? (Cracking
    up.) I can pretend too, you little dick!

    Riggan shoves Mike violently.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Don't fuck with me, Mike.

    MIKE
    You're crazy...

    RIGGAN
    You have no idea what I'm capable of. You
    understand me?
    Riggan pulls the paper out of his back pocket.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    Working with Riggan Thomson is like
    waltzing with a monkey?

    He smacks Mike in the head with the paper and begins to jump in
    front of him, ready to fight.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    Let’s go. Put your hands up.



    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 70.

    MIKE
    (Tauntingly.)
    Don't you want to go put on your tights and
    your--

    Riggan punches him on the face. Mike needs a few seconds to
    understand what has just happened. Then they begin to wrestle
    in the hallway. Mike breaks free from the headlock.

    MIKE (CONT’D)
    What are you gonna do? You gonna get rid of
    me? Huh? What do you think my friend
    Tabitha is going to write in the Times
    after you get rid of me?

    Riggan stares at Mike, paralyzed by the truth. Finally, he
    turns and marches to his dressing room, and we follow him...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, and Riggan is left questioning the consequences of his actions. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him.
    Strengths
    • Intense and emotional confrontations
    • Powerful dialogue
    • Revelation of personal trauma
    • Strong character development
    Weaknesses
    • Some moments of physical violence may be disturbing to some viewers

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with intense confrontations and revelations. The dialogue is powerful and the conflict between characters is palpable.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of the scene revolves around the consequences of inappropriate behavior and the revelation of personal trauma. It explores the complex dynamics between characters and the emotional turmoil they experience.

    Plot: 8

    The plot of the scene revolves around the confrontation between Riggan and Mike, as well as the revelation of Riggan's personal story. It adds depth to the overall story and raises the stakes for the characters.

    Originality: 9

    The level of originality in this scene is high. The situation of a confrontation between two actors in a theater dressing room is a familiar one, but the dialogue and character dynamics are fresh and unique. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters in this scene are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are clearly portrayed. Their interactions and conflicts drive the scene forward and create a strong emotional impact.

    Character Changes: 8

    The character of Riggan undergoes a significant change in this scene as he confronts his own past and questions the consequences of his actions. Mike also experiences a moment of remorse and realization.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to assert his authority and control over the situation. He wants to prove that he is the one in charge and that he deserves respect as the creator and star of the play. This reflects his deeper need for validation and recognition.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to confront and confront his co-star, Mike, about his behavior and actions. This reflects the immediate challenge of dealing with a difficult and uncooperative cast member.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict in this scene is intense and multi-layered. It involves both physical and emotional confrontations between characters, leading to a high level of tension and drama.

    Opposition: 9

    The opposition in this scene is strong, as Riggan and Mike are in direct conflict with each other. The audience is unsure of how the confrontation will unfold and who will come out on top.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes in this scene are high, as the characters' personal and professional lives are at risk. The confrontations and revelations have the potential to impact the success of the Broadway production and the characters' relationships.

    Story Forward: 8

    The scene moves the story forward by deepening the conflicts and relationships between characters. It raises the stakes and sets the stage for further developments in the plot.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because the audience doesn't know how the conflict between the characters will escalate or resolve. The unexpected revelation about Riggan's father adds an element of surprise to the scene.

    Philosophical Conflict: 9

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene. It is a conflict between Riggan's belief in the importance of authenticity and Mike's belief in the importance of self-promotion and image. This challenges Riggan's values and worldview, as he sees himself as a serious artist while Mike prioritizes fame and attention.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene has a strong emotional impact on the audience, evoking feelings of anger, insecurity, confusion, horror, and remorse. The intense confrontations and revelations elicit a visceral response.

    Dialogue: 9

    The dialogue in this scene is powerful and impactful. It reveals the characters' emotions, motivations, and personal stories. The confrontations and revelations are delivered with intensity and authenticity.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it is filled with tension and conflict. The sharp and confrontational dialogue keeps the audience on edge and interested in the outcome of the scene.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene is effective in building tension and maintaining the audience's interest. The dialogue and action are paced in a way that keeps the scene moving forward and escalates the conflict.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses standard screenplay format with clear scene headings, action lines, and dialogue.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by dialogue and action lines. The scene progresses with a clear conflict and resolution.


    Critique
    • The scene starts abruptly with Riggan discovering Mike in a sun bed, which feels a bit random and disconnected from the previous scene. It would be helpful to have a smoother transition or a brief setup to establish why Riggan is looking for Mike.
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Mike is confrontational and intense, which matches the emotional tone of the scene. However, some of the insults and language used feel excessive and may distract from the core conflict.
    • The revelation about Riggan's father being a mean drunk is a powerful moment, but the subsequent reveal that it was all a lie feels forced and unnecessary. It undermines the impact of the previous revelation and comes across as a cheap trick to manipulate Mike.
    • The physical altercation between Riggan and Mike adds to the tension, but it would be helpful to have a clearer motivation for their fight. It seems to stem from Riggan's anger and frustration, but it could be strengthened by tying it more directly to their conflict over the play and the interview.
    • The scene ends abruptly with Riggan storming off to his dressing room, leaving the resolution of the conflict unresolved. It would be beneficial to have a clearer resolution or a hint at the consequences of their argument.
    • There is a missed opportunity to explore the emotional impact of the interview on Riggan. It would be interesting to see his vulnerability and insecurity in response to the article and how it affects his relationship with Mike and the play.
    Suggestions
    • Consider adding a brief setup or transition to establish why Riggan is looking for Mike in the sun bed.
    • Tone down some of the excessive insults and language to maintain focus on the core conflict.
    • Reconsider the false revelation about Riggan's father and find a more organic way to escalate the conflict between Riggan and Mike.
    • Provide a clearer motivation for the physical altercation between Riggan and Mike, tying it more directly to their conflict over the play and the interview.
    • Add a resolution or hint at the consequences of their argument to provide a sense of closure.
    • Explore Riggan's emotional vulnerability and insecurity in response to the article, adding depth to his character and the impact of the conflict.



    Scene 23 -  Riggan's Confrontation
    34 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 34

    ...Riggan slams the door shut and paces in a rage. He glares at
    a make-up box on the table and, points his finger at it, and
    sends it flying across the room.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    You are lame, Riggan. Rolling around
    with that third rate actor in an 800
    seat shithole like this.

    RIGGAN
    (Whispering.)
    Breathing in, I feel my rage. Breathing
    out, I embrace my mental formations.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    You're going to let that poncey theater
    fuck threaten you?

    Riggan continues breathing deeply with his eyes tightly closed.
    He smiles a tiny artificial smile.

    RIGGAN
    (Whispering.)
    Breathing in, I am calm. Breathing out,
    I ignore my mental formations. This is a
    mental formation. This is a mental form--

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    Stop that shit. I am not a mental
    formation. I am "you", asshole.

    Riggan looks down at the poster on the floor.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 71.

    RIGGAN
    (Whispering.)
    Leave me alone.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    You were a movie star, remember?
    Pretentious, but happy...

    Riggan opens his eyes, slowly. A sad expression on his face.

    RIGGAN
    I was not happy.

    BIRDMAN
    ...Ignorant but charming. Now you are a
    tiny bitter cocksucker.

    RIGGAN
    Shut up! Stop whining! I was miserable!

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    Yeah. But fake miserable. Hollywood
    miserable.

    Riggan points his fingers at a lamp and sends it flying.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    What are you trying to prove? Huh? That
    you’re an artist? You’re not.

    RIGGAN
    Fuck you!

    Riggan points his fingers at a chair and sends it flying.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    Fuck you, coward! And fuck those critics
    that made you quit. Our franchise
    grossed billions worldwi--

    RIGGAN
    And billions of flies eat shit everyday!
    So what? Does that make it good? (Beat.)
    And I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but
    that was 1992! Look at me! (He takes off
    his shirt.) This is what's left!
    (Grabbing his neck.) This! (Grabbing his
    chest.) This! (Totally exploding.) I'm
    fucking disappearing! I'm the answer to a
    fucking trivial pursuit question.

    Riggan sits down, exhausted.



    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 72.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    What part of that don't you get? You're
    fucking dead.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    We are not dead. We’re--

    RIGGAN
    Stop saying 'we'! There is no 'we'. I am
    not you. I'm Riggan fucking Thomson.
    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    No. You're Birdman. Because without me, all
    that's left is "you". A sad, selfish,
    mediocre actor, grasping--

    Riggan points his finger and sends the poster flying, spearing
    it on a coat rack, piercing Birdman right through the heart.
    Finally, silence. Until...

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    What the hell did you do that for? I liked
    that poster.

    A confused Riggan looks over to the wall, where the lamp on the
    floor is creating a shadow of his figure. Only in the shadow, it
    appears as if Riggan is wearing the Birdman costume. Stunned,
    Riggan slowly lifts one arm and in the shadow we see a wing.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    It's always 'we' brother.

    The television turns on by itself, playing an episode of the
    original Birdman cartoon. Riggan points his fingers at the tv
    and sends it hurling at the shadow. Then he proceeds to
    destroy everything in his room with his telekinetic powers.

    We slowly pan to see that, behind Riggan, Jake stands on the
    other side of the half-opened door. We push in on Jake,
    watching in shock. The camera turns and becomes Jake's POV...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, and Riggan is left questioning the consequences of his actions. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him.
    Strengths "The strengths of this scene include the powerful performances, the intense conflict, and the exploration of Riggan's past trauma."
    Weaknesses "One weakness of this scene may be the reliance on telekinetic powers, which may be seen as unrealistic by some viewers."

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    This scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with strong performances and intense conflict.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of Riggan's internal struggle and the presence of the Birdman character adds depth and complexity to the scene.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene revolves around Riggan's confrontation with Mike and the revelation of his past trauma, which drives the conflict forward.

    Originality: 9

    This scene demonstrates a fresh approach to exploring the theme of identity and self-doubt. The use of telekinetic powers as a metaphor for the protagonist's internal struggles adds a unique and unexpected element to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue contributes to the originality of the scene.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters in this scene, particularly Riggan and Mike, are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed.

    Character Changes: 9

    Riggan experiences a significant change in this scene as he confronts his past trauma and questions the consequences of his actions.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to confront and come to terms with his own insecurities and feelings of inadequacy. He is grappling with his own identity and struggling to find meaning and purpose in his life.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is not clearly defined. However, it can be inferred that he wants to prove himself as a serious actor and regain his former glory.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 10

    The conflict in this scene is high, both emotionally and physically, as Riggan and Mike engage in a physical fight.

    Opposition: 8

    The opposition in this scene is strong, as the protagonist is confronted by his own inner demons and insecurities. The audience is unsure of how the protagonist will overcome these obstacles and find resolution.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high in this scene as Riggan's reputation and the success of the play are at risk.

    Story Forward: 8

    The scene moves the story forward by deepening the conflict between Riggan and Mike and revealing more about Riggan's character.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it introduces the element of telekinetic powers, which adds a surprising and unexpected twist to the narrative. The audience does not know how the protagonist will use or control these powers.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the protagonist's struggle between his desire for artistic integrity and his fear of being seen as a failure. This conflict challenges his beliefs and values about success and happiness.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions, particularly anger, sadness, and confusion, through the intense performances and the revelation of Riggan's past trauma.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue in this scene is intense and reveals important information about the characters' pasts and motivations.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it presents a dramatic confrontation between the protagonist and his inner demons. The dialogue and actions of the characters create a sense of tension and emotional intensity.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by gradually building tension and emotional intensity. The dialogue and actions of the characters are paced in a way that keeps the audience engaged and invested in the scene.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 8

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses standard screenplay format, with clear scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 7

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by dialogue and character actions. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


    Critique
    • The scene lacks interaction with other characters, which can make it feel stagnant and unengaging.
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Birdman can be confusing and hard to follow, especially for viewers who are not familiar with the concept of an alter ego.
    • The use of telekinetic powers feels out of place and detracts from the realism of the story.
    • The scene could benefit from more visual elements to break up the dialogue and add interest.
    • The emotional breakdown feels sudden and unearned, as there is no buildup or foreshadowing leading up to it.
    Suggestions
    • Consider adding another character to the scene to create more interaction and conflict.
    • Simplify the dialogue between Riggan and Birdman to make it more accessible to viewers.
    • Consider removing the telekinetic powers to maintain the realism of the story.
    • Add more visual elements to the scene, such as Riggan physically destroying objects in the room.
    • Build up to the emotional breakdown by foreshadowing Riggan's mental state in previous scenes.



    Scene 24 -  Confrontation and Doubt
    35 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 35

    ...and now, from his view, we see Riggan yelling at the shadow.

    RIGGAN
    Fuck you! Fuck you!

    He picks up a chair and throws it down. He then picks up the
    newspaper from the floor and tossing it all around. And now we
    understand that he is not using telepathy. He has been using
    only his hands. Completely mad. As Riggan turns to pick up
    something else, he spots Jake on the other side of the door. He
    immediately calms himself and walks over.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 73.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    What's up?

    JAKE
    Um... Well. Two hours to curtain. Why don’t
    you rest a little bit?

    RIGGAN
    Yeah. Sure.

    JAKE
    Last preview, buddy. We’re almost there.

    RIGGAN
    Okay.

    JAKE
    How ya doin?

    RIGGAN
    Good. Great.
    JAKE
    Good. That's good.
    (A beat.)
    The, uh, money came through. I just have to
    transfer it to the account.

    RIGGAN
    Oh, that's terrific...

    JAKE
    Okay. Well, I'm gonna do that.
    (He stares at Riggan who
    seems about to collapse.)
    You know I’m proud of you, right? This took
    balls. And you did it.

    Riggan nods. An exhausted sadness in his eyes.

    RIGGAN
    I can’t do this anymore, Jake.

    JAKE
    What?

    RIGGAN
    I think I’m gonna cancel the
    preview. I’m exhausted.

    JAKE
    It’s a joke, right? (He forces a
    laugh.) Good one, Riggan.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 74.

    RIGGAN
    I’m starting to believe that this is not
    for me. The applause is... lukewarm. I
    think they’re laughing at me.

    JAKE
    What are you--? Listen. There’s a three
    block line of people waiting to see you.
    We are sold out. It’s a full house.

    RIGGAN
    Really?

    JAKE
    Yes. And the French embassador is
    coming. And the prince of Saudi Arabia,
    with one of his wives. And... I wasn’t
    going to tell you this, but-- Martin
    Scorsese. He’s casting for his new
    film. But don’t tell anyone, okay? This
    is between you and me.
    RIGGAN
    Okay. I’ll be ready.

    Riggan smiles. He has forgotten about his existential doubts.
    A worried Jake closes the door. He walks a few steps and
    finds Laura and Lesley. They’ve been listening to his
    conversation with Riggan.

    LESLEY
    How is he?

    JAKE
    He’ll be okay.

    LESLEY
    Poor creature.

    LAURA
    Is it true? Scorsese?
    JAKE
    Yes. And the new Pope too.
    (Beat.)

    They both understand.

    LAURA
    You’re an asshole, Jake.

    JAKE
    I’m the one keeping this boat afloat.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 75.

    LESLEY
    So there is no line of people out there?

    JAKE
    I don’t know. Now go and get ready.
    That’s your job.
    (He begins to walk.)
    I’ll better invest in a taco truck, or
    a strip joint near the airport.

    Laura leaves. We follow Lesley up to Riggan’s dressing room.
    She knocks on the door. Nothing. Silence. She half-opens the
    door and, from behind her, we see Riggan examining his right
    hand. He has blood falling from the palm to the wrist.

    LESLEY
    Are you okay?

    RIGGAN
    (Smiles.)
    Yeah, I-- This is nothing. Shaving.
    He cleans his hand against his trousers.

    LESLEY
    I just want to say I'm sorry.

    RIGGAN
    For what?

    LESLEY
    I knew what Mike was capable of,
    and I brought him in, anyway.

    RIGGAN
    You did good.

    Lesley nods. A beat.

    LESLEY
    Tomorrow's my first opening night
    on Broadway.

    RIGGAN
    Mine too.

    LESLEY
    And I want you to know that,
    whatever happens, I'll always be
    grateful to you for that.

    RIGGAN
    Me too. It’s going to be great. Full
    house.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 76.

    She looks at him with tender eyes. Then we follow her along
    the corridor until she passes by Mike’s dressing room. Mike
    half-opens the door and sees Lesley walking by. He has a
    black eye. He waits for Lesley to be completely gone, and
    then he comes out of his dressing room and we follow him up
    the stairs to...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, and Riggan is left questioning the consequences of his actions. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him.
    Strengths
    • Intense conflict
    • Powerful dialogue
    • Emotional impact
    Weaknesses
    • None identified

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with intense conflict and a revelation of personal trauma. The dialogue is powerful and the characters' actions and emotions are well portrayed.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting one's actions and facing personal demons is well executed in this scene.

    Plot: 9

    The plot progresses significantly with the confrontation and physical fight, leading to a moment of doubt for Riggan.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a theater actor facing doubts and insecurities is familiar, the specific circumstances and dialogue are unique to this story. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and motivations are well developed and their interactions drive the scene.

    Character Changes: 9

    Riggan experiences a moment of doubt and questioning of his actions, leading to potential character growth.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to overcome his doubts and insecurities about his performance and the audience's reaction to it. This reflects his deeper need for validation and his fear of failure.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to prepare for the upcoming play and ensure its success. This reflects the immediate circumstances and challenges he is facing as a theater actor.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 10

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates into a physical fight, creating high tension and drama.

    Opposition: 7

    The opposition in this scene is moderate. The protagonist faces internal opposition in the form of his doubts and insecurities, as well as external opposition in the form of potential audience reactions and the pressure to succeed.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high as Riggan's reputation and the success of the play are at risk.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by creating conflict and raising doubts about the play's success.

    Unpredictability: 6

    This scene is somewhat unpredictable because it introduces the protagonist's doubts and potential decision to cancel the preview, which goes against the expectations of a successful play. However, the overall outcome is still uncertain.

    Philosophical Conflict: 0

    There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions, including anger, sadness, and shock.

    Dialogue: 9

    The dialogue is intense and reveals the characters' vulnerabilities and fears.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it captures the protagonist's emotional journey and creates a sense of tension and anticipation. The dialogue and interactions between the characters keep the audience invested in the story.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene is effective in conveying the protagonist's emotional state and building tension. The dialogue and actions flow smoothly, keeping the audience engaged.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by character actions and dialogue. The scene has a clear beginning, middle, and end.


    Critique
    • The scene feels a bit disjointed and lacks a clear focus or purpose.
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Jake feels repetitive and doesn't add much to the overall story.
    • The news of important guests and potential film roles feels contrived and doesn't have a strong impact on the scene or the story.
    • The interaction between Lesley and Riggan is touching, but it feels disconnected from the rest of the scene.
    • The scene could benefit from more visual elements or actions to help convey the emotions and conflicts.
    • The emotional tone of the scene is uncertain and doesn't build towards a clear resolution or climax.
    Suggestions
    • Consider streamlining the dialogue and focusing on the key conflicts and emotions of the scene.
    • Try to find a clearer purpose or focus for the scene that ties into the overall story.
    • Consider adding more visual elements or actions to help convey the emotions and conflicts.
    • Think about how this scene can build towards a clear resolution or climax that ties into the larger story.
    • Consider cutting or reworking the news of important guests and potential film roles to make it feel more organic and impactful.



    Scene 25 -  Confrontation and Revelation
    38 EXT. ROOFTOP - THEATER - DUSK 38
    ...the rooftop. He finds Sam standing on the cornice, looking
    at the street.

    MIKE
    For fuck's sake, just jump already.

    Sam stares out, a smile creeping over her face.
    SAM
    How did you know I'd be up here?

    MIKE
    I didn't. I was just hoping.

    Silence. Mike walks up next to her and stares out as well.

    SAM
    Where's Lesley?

    MIKE
    Moving on.

    SAM
    Smart girl...

    MIKE
    I appreciate that.
    A beat.

    SAM
    Ready for the last preview?
    (Noticing his black eye.)
    Who did that to you?

    Mike smiles. No answer.

    SAM (CONT’D)
    Could have been anybody, I guess.
    (After a beat.)
    I’m sort of hoping it was Lesley.
    He barely says no, smiling, and lights a cigarette. She
    understands.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 77.

    SAM (CONT’D)
    Oh, don’t tell me...

    Silence.

    MIKE
    What's the worst thing he ever did to
    you?

    Sam is surprised by the question. She thinks for a moment.
    SAM
    He was never around, so...

    MIKE
    That was--?

    SAM
    No. That was-- Who gives a shit. It
    was the way he tried to make up for
    it by constantly trying to convince
    me I was special. (A beat.) What
    about you?

    MIKE
    My dad?

    SAM
    Yeah.

    MIKE
    He pretended I was his son.

    She stares him down. Silence.

    SAM
    So, what happens now?

    MIKE
    I have no idea...
    SAM
    Yeah...

    A beat.

    MIKE
    He was right, though.

    SAM
    About what?

    MIKE
    About your being special. You’re hanging
    around here trying to make yourself
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 78.
    MIKE (CONT'D)
    invisible behind that fragile little fuck
    up routine. But you can’t. You’re
    anything but invisible. You’re big. And
    you’re sort of this really great mess, a
    candle burning at both ends, and no
    amount of booze or pills is gonna hide
    that.

    Sam tosses Mike’s cigarette over the balcony, and kisses him.
    He leans into the kiss.
    MAN'S VOICE
    (From below.)
    Jesus Fuck!

    She suddenly pulls away.

    SAM
    It's a good thing you're an actor and not a
    writer cause that little speech was just
    like, Oprah... Hallmark... R. Kelly bad.
    She kisses him lightly one more time and then walks away. When
    she gets to the door she stops and leans on the frame.

    SAM (CONT’D)
    Truth or dare?

    MIKE
    Truth.

    SAM
    No.

    MIKE
    Truth.

    SAM
    No. Truth or dare?

    The slightest smile as she exits through the door, and after a
    short pause, Mike follows...

    39 INT. HALLWAYS - THEATRE - CONTINUOUS 39

    ...along a darkened hallway. They reach a tiny wooden door and
    Sam leads the way through it.

    MIKE
    Do you have any idea where you're going?

    SAM
    Absolutely not.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 79.

    She continues on until she gets to...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, and Riggan is left questioning the consequences of his actions. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him.
    Strengths
    • Intense confrontation
    • Revealing personal trauma
    • Emotional impact
    Weaknesses
    • Possible lack of subtlety in dialogue

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with intense dialogue and physical action.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting past trauma and the consequences of one's actions is explored effectively in this scene.

    Plot: 8

    The plot progresses as Riggan confronts Mike and the tension between them reaches a breaking point.

    Originality: 8

    This scene demonstrates a level of originality through its authentic portrayal of the characters' emotions and the unique dynamics of their relationship. The dialogue feels fresh and avoids clichés.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters of Riggan and Mike are well-developed and their conflict drives the scene.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a shift in his perspective and questions the consequences of his actions.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to connect with Sam on a deeper level and understand each other's past experiences. This reflects their need for emotional intimacy and a desire for validation.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to navigate their complicated relationship with Sam and potentially start a romantic relationship. This reflects the immediate challenge of their uncertain future and the obstacles they face in their personal lives.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates into a physical fight, creating high tension.

    Opposition: 6

    The opposition in this scene is not particularly strong. The characters face internal conflicts and emotional obstacles, but there are no external forces or challenges that create significant opposition.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high as the confrontation between Riggan and Mike could have significant consequences for the play and their personal lives.

    Story Forward: 8

    The scene moves the story forward by deepening the conflict between characters and raising the stakes.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it subverts expectations by having the characters engage in a deep and emotional conversation instead of a typical romantic encounter. The audience is unsure of how the conversation will unfold.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene regarding the protagonist's beliefs about self-worth and the need for validation. Sam challenges his belief that he is invisible and encourages him to embrace his flaws and uniqueness.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions through the intense confrontation and revelation of personal trauma.

    Dialogue: 9

    The dialogue is intense and reveals important information about the characters' pasts and motivations.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it explores the characters' emotions and their complex relationship. The dialogue and interactions between the characters create tension and intrigue.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing the emotional tension to build gradually. The pauses and silences between the characters' dialogue create a sense of anticipation and reflection.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 9

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It establishes the setting, introduces the characters' goals and conflicts, and progresses the narrative.


    Critique
    • The scene feels disconnected from the rest of the screenplay and doesn't add much to the overall story.
    • The dialogue between Sam and Mike is somewhat cliché and lacks depth.
    • The kiss between Sam and Mike feels forced and doesn't have a clear purpose.
    • The visual elements of the scene are not particularly interesting or significant.
    • The emotional tone of the scene is uncertain and doesn't add to the tension or conflict of the story.
    Suggestions
    • Consider cutting this scene or finding a way to make it more relevant to the overall story.
    • Try to add more depth and complexity to the dialogue between Sam and Mike.
    • If the kiss is meant to be significant, find a way to make it more meaningful and purposeful.
    • Think about adding more interesting visual elements to the scene to make it more engaging.
    • Consider adding more tension or conflict to the scene to make it more impactful.



    Scene 26 -  Confrontation and Revelation
    40 INT. ABOVE STAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 40

    ...the "grid" above stage where the lights are located. We can
    see, below us, the empty seats of the auditorium and the
    kitchen set.

    MIKE
    What now...?

    Mike reaches up to kiss her. She stops him.

    SAM
    How do you do it?
    MIKE
    What?

    SAM
    How do you go out there and pretend to be
    someone else in front of all those people?

    MIKE
    I don't pretend. Not out there. Just about
    every place else, but never out there.

    SAM
    Good to know.

    They stare at one another...

    MIKE
    What are we doing here?

    SAM
    What do you mean?

    MIKE
    I mean, what are we doing here?

    She moves in.

    SAM
    Adrenaline...
    They kiss. The camera begins to drift down toward the stage...

    RIGGAN (O.S.)
    Fucking teenager.

    As the camera continues down from the grid, we discover an
    auditorium full of people staring at the actors on stage.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 80.

    RIGGAN (O.S) (CONT’D)
    By the time I got to the hospital, the
    kid was dead. He was off in a corner
    laid out on a gurney. We took the old
    couple up to the O.R.. They were a
    mess. We worked like hell on them for
    most of the night...

    We pan along the auditorium back to the stage to find Riggan,
    Mike, Lesley and Laura in the kitchen.
    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    When we were done, we wrapped them in
    full body casts. The husband was
    depressed. Even when I told him his
    wife was gonna pull through, he was
    still depressed. So, I got up to his
    mouth hole and asked him, and he told
    me it was because he couldn't see her
    through the eye holes. Can you imagine?
    I’m telling you, the man's heart was
    breaking because he couldn't turn his
    goddamn head and see his goddamn wife.

    LESLEY
    (In genuine tears.)
    That's terrible. (Beat.) Perfect.
    And terrible.

    She is crushed. Laura holds Lesley, trying to control her own
    emotion.

    RIGGAN
    (Taking this in.)
    Yeah. So I guess what we have to
    ask ourselves is... What do we talk
    about when we talk about love?

    The lights go to a blackout and the audience applauds as some
    scene change music plays. As we follow Riggan off stage, the
    lights are turned on again, but now they have an orange mood.
    Lesley is the only one on stage, doing a monologue.

    LESLEY
    Mel and I have been together five
    years, been married for four. But
    it was Ed who taught me something
    no one else could... He taught me
    what it felt like to really feel
    loved. And the terrible thing is
    that if something happened to Mel
    or myself, if something happened to
    either one of us tomorrow, I think
    the other one would grieve for a
    while, you know, but then would go
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 81.
    LESLEY (CONT'D)
    out and love again, have someone
    else soon enough. All this-- All of
    this love we’re talking about... it
    would just be a memory. Maybe not
    even a memory. Am I wrong? I mean,
    I don’t know anything. And I’m the
    first one to admit it.

    A Dresser waits in the wings to help Riggan with his change.

    DRESSER
    That was amazing!

    Riggan looks proud. Things are finally going well. He undresses
    to his underwear and puts on a robe and his moccasins, as the
    stage begins to revolve. Laura, in costume, walks up beside
    him. Over the following dialogue, the kitchen gives way to the
    extravagant garden set we saw before.

    LAURA
    (A bit distant.)
    It's actually going well.

    RIGGAN
    Yeah. (A beat.) Hey. I think we have to
    talk.

    LAURA
    (Sad smile.)
    No. We don't.

    Riggan nods.

    RIGGAN
    Right. (Beat.) We will eventually,
    though, ‘cause that’s the only way I get
    to say I’m sorry. I really am.

    Silence.

    LAURA
    We could've made good parents.

    RIGGAN
    Horrible. We would've been just--

    LAURA
    Awful. Would have raised, like...

    RIGGAN
    ...a serial killer...

    LAURA
    ...or Justin Bieber.
    (She smiles at him.)
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 82.
    LAURA (CONT'D)
    I'm not really the housewife type anyway. I
    thought I could be a mom. My body seems to
    disagree.

    The lights come up and Laura walks onto the stage.

    LAURA (CONT’D)
    (Back to him.)
    You were right. This was fun.
    Riggan watches her go, but something else grabs his attention.
    We pan across the stage to see Sam and Mike on the other side.
    They talk and laugh. Sam kisses Mike softly. Mike playfully
    grabs her ass.

    We pan back to Riggan. His expression morphs from broken-
    hearted to rage. He marches over to a stage hand.
    RIGGAN
    You have a cigarette?

    The stage hand holds out a pack, Riggan takes one.

    STAGE HAND
    You need a light?

    Riggan snatches the lighter and storms out through the hallway,
    and out the back door of the theater to...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, and Riggan is left questioning the consequences of his actions. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him.
    Strengths "Strong performances, intense emotions, impactful dialogue"
    Weaknesses "None identified"

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with strong performances and compelling dialogue.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting inappropriate behavior and revealing personal trauma adds depth to the story.

    Plot: 9

    The plot progresses significantly with the confrontation and physical fight, leading to a turning point for the characters.

    Originality: 0


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and conflicts are well-developed and drive the scene's intensity.

    Character Changes: 9

    Riggan experiences a significant change in his perspective and questions the consequences of his actions.

    Internal Goal: 0

    External Goal: 0


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates from verbal confrontation to a physical fight.

    Opposition: 0

    High Stakes: 8

    The stakes are high as the characters' relationships and the success of the play are at risk.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by deepening the conflicts and raising the stakes for the characters.

    Unpredictability: 0

    Philosophical Conflict: 0


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions, including shock, anger, and heartbreak.

    Dialogue: 9

    The dialogue is powerful and reveals important aspects of the characters' past and motivations.

    Engagement: 0

    Pacing: 0


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 0

    Structure: 0


    Critique
    • The scene lacks clear focus and purpose. It jumps between different characters and their conversations without a clear central conflict or objective.
    • The dialogue feels disjointed and lacks depth. It doesn't effectively convey the emotional tension and uncertainty of the scene.
    • The actions and interactions between the characters are not well-developed. There is a lack of meaningful conflict and resolution.
    • The scene ends abruptly without a clear resolution or sense of closure.
    Suggestions
    • Refocus the scene on Riggan's doubts and insecurities, making it the central conflict of the scene.
    • Develop the dialogue to better convey the emotional tension and uncertainty of the characters.
    • Create more meaningful interactions and conflicts between the characters to drive the scene forward.
    • Provide a clear resolution or sense of closure at the end of the scene.



    Scene 27 -  Riggan's Public Humiliation
    41 EXT. AN ALLEY WAY - OUTSIDE THE THEATER - CONTINUOUS 41

    ...the alley. Down at the end, we can see the tourists making
    their way about the streets. Riggan lights the cigarette and
    leans back against the stage door trying to calm himself.

    RIGGAN
    Breathing in, I calm myself. Breathing out,
    I ease myself.

    But this is New York City. A fluorescent light buzzes above his
    head. Taxis honk their horns. The sound of pedestrians yelling
    at one another. All fueling his agitation.
    Riggan checks his watch. He pulls one last drag from the
    cigarette before he tosses it, and turns to head back in, only
    to realize the door has locked. He tries to pull it open to no
    avail. He begins to knock loudly on the door. There is no
    response. He knocks louder. Nothing.

    He is turning to walk away when he realizes that his robe is
    caught in the door. He checks his watch again and now is
    beginning to panic. He tries to tear at the robe but the terry
    cloth is too strong for him to rip. Frantically, he looks around
    for an answer. No answer. No time. He pulls the robe off of him
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 83.

    and, wearing only his underwear and moccasins, he charges down
    the alley way toward...

    42 EXT. STREET - CONTINUOUS 42

    ...the street. Now, rushing down the block in his underwear. A
    tourist spots him.

    TOURIST
    Hey, aren't you...?

    RIGGAN
    I'm sorry. I can't really--

    TOURIST
    Riggan Thompson! Holy Shit! Let me get an
    autograph.

    Riggan marches on as a few more people begin to notice. The
    Tourist runs in front of him, forcing him to stop.

    TOURIST (CONT'D)
    Come on, man. Don't be a dick. Let me have
    an autograph.

    The man produces a pen and a magazine from his pocket. More
    people begin to gather...

    MAN ON STREET
    Birdman!

    Seeing no other way out, Riggan signs the autograph.

    TOURIST
    Dude! You fuckin' rock!

    Directly in front of him stand a lady and her two kids.

    LADY
    Can we take one picture?

    RIGGAN
    Are you kidding me?

    KID #1
    Why is he naked?
    LADY
    One picture...

    KID #2
    I can see his weenie.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 84.

    Riggan tries to get past them, but a crowd has formed. A swarm
    of cell phones begin to glow like fireflies.

    LADY
    (To her kids.)
    Get next to him!

    RIGGAN
    Give me a fucking break, lady.

    The kids run up next to him. Even more people crowding around.
    Riggan puts up his middle finger, just as the Lady takes the
    shot. He shoves the kids aside and moves on.

    WOMAN ON STREET
    He looks so old in person.

    MAN ON STREET
    (From across the street.)
    You suck!
    RIGGAN
    Fuck you!

    Riggan pushes through the crowd to get to the lobby. The people
    begin to chant. Dozens of cell phones recording him.

    CROWD
    Bird-man! Bird-man! Bird-man!

    Riggan pushes his way through to the lobby doors...

    43 INT. LOBBY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 43

    ...to be stopped by the vision of Ralph in a wheelchair. His
    head wrapped in a bandage. A man in a suit next to him.

    RIGGAN
    Jesus Christ! What're you doing here?

    RALPH
    Waiting for Jake. This is Mr. Roth, my
    attorney.

    Riggan continues walking toward the auditorium. Ralph and Mr.
    Roth follow him.

    MR. ROTH
    We're pursuing financial remuneration for the
    injuries Mr. Pinkus suffered while rehearsing
    your--

    RIGGAN
    I have a play to do.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 85.

    RALPH
    I'm going to ruin you!

    Riggan storms toward the auditorium, but is stopped by an old
    Usher.

    OLD USHER
    I'm sorry sir, you're going to have--

    Riggan shoves the old lady aside and enters...
    Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his behavior and the negative impact on the play. He reveals a personal story about his abusive father, shocking Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and ends up running down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan's public humiliation continues as he is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths "The scene effectively combines intense drama with comedic elements, creating a memorable and engaging sequence. The emotional impact and conflict level are high, and the dialogue is impactful."
    Weaknesses "Some viewers may find the scene's portrayal of public humiliation and intense emotions uncomfortable or excessive."

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene effectively combines intense drama with comedic elements, creating a compelling and memorable sequence. The emotional impact is high, and the conflict level is elevated throughout. The scene also moves the story forward and introduces new challenges for the protagonist.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of Riggan's public humiliation and the exploration of the negative impact of fame and personal struggles is well-executed. The scene effectively portrays the consequences of Riggan's actions and highlights the theme of self-destruction.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene revolves around Riggan's confrontation with Mike, the physical fight that ensues, and the subsequent public humiliation. It is a pivotal moment in the story that raises the stakes and pushes the narrative forward.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a protagonist being locked out and running out of time is not entirely unique, the specific details and interactions with the tourists add freshness to the scene. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters in the scene, particularly Riggan and Mike, are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed. The scene also introduces Ralph and his attorney, adding complexity to the conflict.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant change in this scene as he confronts his past and faces the consequences of his actions. The scene also sets up potential changes for Mike and Ralph.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to calm himself and ease his agitation. This reflects his deeper need for control and validation, as well as his fear of failure and irrelevance.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to get back into the theater and prepare for his play. This reflects the immediate challenge he is facing of being locked out and running out of time.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict in the scene is intense and multi-layered. It starts with the confrontation between Riggan and Mike, escalates into a physical fight, and continues with Riggan's public humiliation. The conflict between Riggan and Ralph also adds to the tension.

    Opposition: 8

    The opposition in this scene is strong as the protagonist faces obstacles such as being locked out, dealing with demanding tourists, and being confronted by Ralph and his attorney. The audience doesn't know how Riggan will overcome these obstacles.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high in this scene as Riggan's reputation and personal relationships are at risk. The public humiliation and potential legal consequences add to the intensity.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by introducing new challenges and conflicts for the protagonist. It also sets up future confrontations and developments.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because the audience doesn't know how Riggan will handle being locked out and running out of time. The interactions with the tourists and the crowd add an element of unpredictability.

    Philosophical Conflict: 0

    There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions from the audience, ranging from shock and anger to empathy and amusement. Riggan's vulnerability and the public humiliation he experiences create a powerful emotional impact.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue in the scene is impactful and reveals important information about the characters' pasts and motivations. It effectively conveys the escalating tension and conflict between Riggan and Mike.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it captures the protagonist's desperation and the chaotic environment he is in. The interactions with the tourists and the crowd add tension and suspense.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by gradually building tension and suspense. The quick and concise scene direction and dialogue keep the scene moving at a brisk pace.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 9

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with an establishing shot, followed by a series of actions and dialogue that build tension and conflict.


    Critique
    • The scene feels disconnected from the previous scenes and the overall plot of the screenplay. It seems like a random event that happens to Riggan without much consequence.
    • The interactions with the fans feel forced and unrealistic. It's hard to believe that Riggan would be so easily recognized and that so many people would gather around him in such a short amount of time.
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Ralph feels contrived and lacks depth. It's unclear why Ralph is seeking financial compensation and why he is so angry with Riggan.
    • The visual elements of the scene are interesting, but they don't add much to the overall story or character development.
    • The emotional tone of the scene is chaotic and tense, but it doesn't feel earned or justified. It's hard to empathize with Riggan or understand his motivations in this scene.
    • The scene ends abruptly and without resolution. It's unclear what the purpose of this scene is and how it fits into the overall narrative of the screenplay.
    Suggestions
    • Consider cutting this scene or reworking it to better fit into the overall plot and character development.
    • If you choose to keep this scene, try to make the interactions with the fans more realistic and grounded in the world of the screenplay.
    • Develop the conflict between Riggan and Ralph more fully, giving Ralph more depth and motivation for seeking financial compensation.
    • Consider adding more visual elements that add to the emotional tone and character development of the scene.
    • Make sure the scene has a clear purpose and resolution that fits into the overall narrative of the screenplay.



    Scene 28 -  Confrontation and Revelation
    44 INT. AUDITORIUM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 44

    ...the theater. Riggan stands in the back among the audience.
    He sees the "rain" falling on the stage. The "Motel" sign is
    lit. Mike and Lesley are in bed, for the motel scene, waiting
    for the knock on the door. With nothing else to do, Riggan
    yells his line from the back of the auditorium...

    RIGGAN
    Knock knock knock! Terri! Terri!

    The audience turns to see Riggan standing in his underwear.
    They begin to murmur and laugh and point at him.
    Riggan marches down the aisle. He looks haggard and covered
    with perspiration.

    Lesley and Mike, confused, come out of bed.

    LESLEY
    Ed! What are you doing here?

    RIGGAN
    Why? I need you to tell me why. I lived for
    you-- I worshipped you...

    MIKE
    Listen Ed, I know this is hard but--

    RIGGAN
    Fuck you. Shut up. Fuck you.

    Giggles from the audience. Riggan turns threateningly and points
    to an audience member on the aisle who is giggling at him.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Shut up!

    The guy stops smiling. The audience goes silent. Riggan arrives
    at the apron of the stage. Annie from the wings slides the gun
    towards him. Riggan grabs it and points it at Mike.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 86.

    LESLEY
    Eddie! Please!

    Riggan climbs onto the stage. Exhausted. He goes to Mike and,
    with a last effort, pushes him lamely.

    RIGGAN
    What's wrong with me? Why do I end
    up having to beg people to love me?

    LESLEY
    Ed. Eddie. Please... Give me the gun.

    We pan to the wings where Jake is staring in disbelief. His
    cellphone begins to vibrate, and he answers.

    JAKE
    Yeah. (A beat.) What?... No no no no no no
    no. Wait there. I'm coming out in--

    He walks toward the hallway and we follow him...

    45 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 45

    ...through the corridor.

    JAKE
    No. Wait. Wait for me. I'll be there in a
    second. (Beat.) What is that, a threat?
    (Beat.) What wheelchair? (Beat.) Wait.
    Don't hang up. Mr. Roth, we can discuss--
    Hello?... Hello?...

    He goes out one of the exits and we are left with the silence of
    the empty hallway. After a few seconds, the sound of the gunshot
    from the scene echoes through the theater. The audience
    applauds. The camera starts to move forward. A few seconds later
    Riggan takes over the POV with his bloody long wig and the fake
    gun. We follow up to...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him.
    Strengths
    • Intense conflict
    • Revealing character moments
    • Emotional impact
    Weaknesses
    • Possible reliance on physical violence

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with intense conflict and revelations that deepen the story.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting past trauma and the consequences of one's actions is explored effectively in this scene.

    Plot: 9

    The plot advances significantly as Riggan confronts Mike and faces the consequences of his actions.

    Originality: 8

    This scene demonstrates a level of originality through its portrayal of a character's breakdown on stage and the use of a gun prop. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and conflicts are portrayed convincingly, adding depth to their development.

    Character Changes: 9

    Riggan undergoes a significant change as he confronts his past trauma and questions the consequences of his actions.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to confront and express his feelings of frustration and desperation. It reflects his deeper need for validation and love, as well as his fear of being forgotten and unloved.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to confront and intimidate another character. It reflects the immediate challenge of asserting his power and control in the situation.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 10

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates from verbal confrontation to a physical fight, creating high tension.

    Opposition: 8

    The opposition in this scene is strong as the protagonist faces mockery and laughter from the audience, as well as resistance from the other characters. The audience is unsure of how the confrontation will go.

    High Stakes: 8

    The stakes are high as Riggan's reputation and the success of the play are at risk.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by deepening the conflict and raising the stakes for Riggan.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it includes unexpected actions and dialogue from the protagonist, as well as a sudden gunshot.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between the protagonist's belief in the importance of love and validation, and the audience's laughter and mockery. This challenges his belief in his own worth and the value of his art.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions through the intense confrontation, shocking revelation, and Riggan's internal struggle.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue is intense and impactful, effectively conveying the characters' emotions and motivations.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it presents a dramatic and intense confrontation between characters, with high stakes and emotional tension.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by gradually building tension and suspense, and then releasing it with the gunshot and applause from the audience.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre with clear scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 9

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre by clearly establishing the setting, introducing the characters, and building tension towards a climax.


    Critique null
    Suggestions null



    Scene 29 -  Confrontation and Reflection
    46 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 46

    ...his dressing room. He puts on a robe. He walks to his
    refrigerator without acknowledging Sam who is sitting on the
    couch, scribbling her dashes on the toilet paper once again.
    Riggan takes out a plastic container of bologna and a jar of
    mustard. He sits in front of his dressing table, peels open the
    bologna and opens the jar of mustard. Slice by slice, he dips
    the bologna in the mustard and shoves it into his mouth.

    SAM
    Dad...?

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 87.

    RIGGAN
    (Looking up.)
    Hey. How ya doin'?

    SAM
    Are you okay?

    RIGGAN
    Why?

    SAM
    I don't know. You seem--

    RIGGAN
    (Eating.)
    I'm good. This is good.
    (Holding out a piece.)
    You want some?

    SAM
    I'm good.
    RIGGAN
    Great. Great.

    He continues to eat. She tries to fill the odd silence.

    SAM
    So. Opening night, tomorrow.

    RIGGAN
    Yeah.

    SAM
    That's exciting, huh?

    RIGGAN
    Yeah. Well... I don't know. The previews
    have been a train wreck. We haven't been
    able to get through a performance
    without a raging fire... or a raging
    hard-on. I'm not really sleeping, you
    know, at all. And I'm pretty much broke.
    Oh, and also, this play feels like a
    miniature, deformed version of myself
    that keeps following me around, hitting
    me in the balls with a tiny hammer.
    (Beat.)
    Sorry, what was your question?

    SAM
    (Looking through phone.)
    Never mind... Tonight wasn't bad. It was
    weird. But that's sort of cool. People
    seemed to like it.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 88.

    Silence. Riggan notices the toilet paper.

    RIGGAN
    What are you doing? Some homework?

    SAM
    No. I don't-- When I was in rehab, they
    made us do this.

    RIGGAN
    Really...
    SAM
    Yeah. These dashes, represent the six
    billion years the planet has existed.
    Each dash represents 100 years.

    She unravels the roll and we see that there are thousands of
    black marks running along the toilet paper. She takes the last
    two panels and tears them off.
    SAM (CONT'D)
    And this... (Hands them to him.) ...is
    supposed to represent the entire time us
    humans have been here. One hundred and
    fifty thousand years. That's it.
    (Beat.)
    I guess they were trying to remind us
    that that's what all our egos and self-
    obsession are worth.

    Riggan stares at the paper, and then at Sam.

    RIGGAN
    (Casually.)
    I was a shitty father, wasn't I?

    SAM
    No. You were a-- (She stops herself.)
    You were fine.
    He stops chewing and stares out.

    RIGGAN
    Fine... You're right. I am just
    "fine". Adorably mediocre.

    He smiles to her sadly, and then he wipes the mustard from his
    face with the piece of toilet paper.

    SAM
    Dad!

    RIGGAN
    What?
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 89.

    Sam looks at the ruined toilet paper in his hands.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    Oh... Shit. I'm sorry.

    SAM
    (Smiling.)
    It's okay. You just destroyed the entire
    human race in one blow.

    Riggan looks at her with the saddest of expressions.
    SAM (CONT’D)
    Dad. (She hesitates.) Do you know
    you’re becoming a trending topic?

    RIGGAN
    Really? What does that mean?

    Sam searches for something on her iPhone and then hands it to
    Riggan. Riggan looks at the phone and sees a hand-held video of
    himself in the streets in his underwear.

    SAM
    350,000 views in less than an hour.
    Believe it or not, this is power.

    Riggan looks at more footage, seemingly confused. After a
    moment, the phone vibrates and the video is interrupted by a
    text message, which reads “Truth or Dare?”

    RIGGAN
    It’s for you.

    She grabs the phone and looks at the screen. Then at her
    father. Riggan is staring at her. She looks down.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Go ahead...

    SAM
    (Hesitant.)
    Are you...?

    RIGGAN
    Go.

    A sympathetic smile. An understanding. Sam exits.

    Riggan stares into the mirror absently. His eyes locked on
    his reflection trying to find himself in the image. Then he
    spots a vase with dying roses, the same roses he flung to the
    ground previously.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 90.

    He gets up and goes into the bathroom. He pulls off the long
    wig and the mustache. He washes his face. Then he opens a
    small bottle and uses the liquid to scrub his goatee. The
    dark dye begins to run out, leaving only white hair. For the
    first time we see that Riggan has a white beard.

    He puts on new clothes and comes out of the bathroom. He grabs
    a beige raincoat and heads out of the dressing room and
    into...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan reflects on his role as a father and his current state of being. Sam informs Riggan about his viral video and the power it holds.
    Strengths "Intense emotional conflicts, powerful dialogue, and effective portrayal of character development."
    Weaknesses "Some may find the scene's emotional intensity overwhelming or the dialogue too heavy-handed."

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene effectively portrays the intense emotions and conflicts between characters, while also providing insight into Riggan's personal struggles and the consequences of his actions.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting past traumas and the consequences of one's actions is well-executed in this scene.

    Plot: 9

    The plot progresses significantly as Riggan confronts Mike and reflects on his own fatherhood, leading to a physical fight and further complications with the viral video.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a father seeking validation from his daughter is not entirely unique, the specific details and dialogue add freshness to the familiar theme. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue contributes to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and conflicts are portrayed effectively, especially Riggan's internal struggle and the shock experienced by Mike.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant change in his perception of himself as a father and the consequences of his actions.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to find validation and reassurance from his daughter. This reflects his deeper need for approval and his fear of being a bad father.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to eat his bologna and mustard snack. This reflects the immediate circumstances of him being hungry and needing sustenance.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates from a verbal confrontation to a physical fight, intensifying the emotional impact of the scene.

    Opposition: 4

    The opposition in this scene is not strong. There are no significant obstacles or conflicts that the protagonist needs to overcome. The audience knows how the conversation will go.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high as Riggan's personal and professional life are at risk due to his confrontations, reflection, and public humiliation.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by deepening the conflicts and consequences faced by Riggan, setting up further confrontations and complications.

    Unpredictability: 5

    This scene is unpredictable because it presents unexpected moments of vulnerability and self-reflection from the protagonist. The audience may not anticipate the depth of his insecurities.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between the protagonist's self-doubt and his daughter's attempt to reassure him. This challenges the protagonist's belief in his own worth and his worldview of being a failure.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions through the intense confrontations, Riggan's reflection on his fatherhood, and the public humiliation he experiences.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue effectively conveys the emotions and conflicts between characters, particularly in Riggan's revelation about his abusive father.

    Engagement: 7

    This scene is engaging because it explores the complex relationship between the protagonist and his daughter. The dialogue and emotional moments create a sense of tension and curiosity.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing moments of silence and reflection, as well as maintaining a steady rhythm in the dialogue exchanges.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, introduces the characters, and progresses through their dialogue and actions.


    Critique
    • The scene lacks a clear conflict or tension, making it feel somewhat stagnant.
    • The dialogue feels somewhat forced and unnatural, particularly in the exchange about the toilet paper.
    • The visual elements of the scene, such as the toilet paper and dying roses, feel somewhat heavy-handed and symbolic.
    • The scene could benefit from more active and dynamic blocking to add visual interest.
    • The emotional tone of the scene is somewhat melancholic and introspective, but could benefit from more nuance and complexity.
    • The scene could benefit from more character development and exploration of the relationship between Riggan and Sam.
    Suggestions
    • Consider adding a clear conflict or tension to the scene to make it more engaging.
    • Work on making the dialogue feel more natural and organic to the characters.
    • Consider using visual elements more subtly and sparingly to avoid heavy-handed symbolism.
    • Experiment with more dynamic blocking to add visual interest and movement to the scene.
    • Explore the emotional complexity of the scene and the characters' relationships to add depth and nuance.
    • Consider adding more character development and exploration to the scene to make it more engaging and meaningful.



    Scene 30 -  Confrontation and Humiliation
    47 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 47

    ...the hallway. As he passes by Mike’s door he can hear Sam and
    Mike. They’re trying to be as quiet as possible, but we can hear
    them flirting and laughing.

    He pauses for a moment but continues on. After a few seconds,
    his phone vibrates. He looks at it. A text from Jake reads:
    “Have you seen this??? Awesome!!!” He clicks the attachment and
    sees the, now infamous, video of his underwear escapade in the
    street. We zoom in until the image fills the screen, when we
    finally pull away, we discover that...

    48 INT. RUM HOUSE - LATER 48
    ...Riggan's video is being played now in a television in the
    bar. We see the MTV logo on the bottom of the screen and a video
    caption that reads: “Birdman goes viral, 930.000 views and
    counting”. The camera pans to find Riggan sitting at the bar,
    drunk. He is one of the few customers. He polishes off his
    drink.
    RIGGAN
    Let me have another one.

    BARTENDER
    You got it.

    The bartender pours another whiskey for Riggan. A waiter steps
    up to the bar. The bartender points to a martini.

    BARTENDER (CONT'D)
    (To the waiter.)
    That's going over to Ms. Dickinson.

    Riggan's head tilts at the mention of the name. He looks over to
    see Tabitha sitting at a table, scratching in her notebook.

    RIGGAN
    (Hands the waiter a bill.)
    I got it. She's a friend of mine.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 91.

    The waiter pockets the money and gives Riggan the drink. He
    walks it over to Tabitha and places it down in front of her. Not
    looking up, she pulls the drink closer and takes a sip.

    Riggan sits down across from her. She looks up and immediately
    recognizes him. He takes out the Carver cocktail napkin and
    pushes it in front of her. She looks at him, and then down to
    the napkin. She reads it in silence.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    (Re: The napkin.)
    That was twenty years before I put on that
    damned costume.

    A pause. Then she pushes the napkin back toward him.

    TABITHA
    I don't care.

    RIGGAN
    I'm just saying, when you come tomorrow
    night, I want you--

    TABITHA
    It doesn’t matter.

    RIGGAN
    What are you--

    TABITHA
    I'm going to destroy your play.

    RIGGAN
    You haven't even seen it. I don't-- Did I
    do something to offend you?

    TABITHA
    As a matter of fact you did. You took up
    space in a theater which otherwise might
    have been used on something worthwhile.
    RIGGAN
    But you don't even know if it's--

    TABITHA
    That’s true. I haven't read a word of it,
    or even seen a preview, but after the
    opening tomorrow I'm going to turn in the
    worst review anybody has ever read. And I'm
    going to close your play. Would you like to
    know why? Because I hate you. And everyone
    you represent. Entitled. Spoiled. Selfish.
    Children. Blissfully untrained, unversed
    and unprepared to even attempt real art.
    Handing each other awards for cartoons and
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 92.
    TABITHA (CONT'D)
    pornography. Measuring your worth in
    weekends. Well, this is the theater, and
    you don't get to come in here and pretend
    you can write, direct and act in your own
    propaganda piece without going through me
    first. So, break a leg.

    Tabitha goes back to her writing. Riggan sits for a moment.

    RIGGAN
    What has to happen in someone's life,
    for them to end up becoming a critic?

    She looks up at him.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Whatcha writin’? You reviewin’ a play? Was
    it good? Bad? Did you even see it? Lemme
    read.

    He snatches the notebook from her.
    TABITHA
    I will call the police.

    RIGGAN
    No you won’t. Let’s read your review!
    (He scans the notebook.)
    “Callow”. A label. “Lackluster”. Label.
    “Marginalia”. Sounds like you need
    penicillin to clear that up. None the
    less... label.
    (Looks to Tabitha.)
    All labels. You’re a lazy fucker
    aren’t you?
    (Looks one last time at
    the notebook.)
    Epistemological vertigo?

    Tabitha wants to reach for the notebook, but her pride won’t
    let her. Riggan takes a flower from a vase at the center of the
    table.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    You know what this is? You don’t, do
    you? You can’t even see it if you don’t
    label it. You mistake those sounds in
    your head for true knowledge.

    TABITHA
    Are you finished?

    RIGGAN
    (Wrinkling one of the pages.)
    Nothin’ about intention, structure,
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 93.
    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    technique. Just crappy opinions backed
    up by crappy comparisons. You’re
    incapable of writing more than a couple
    of paragraphs, and you risk nothing of
    yourself.
    (He tears out the page and tosses
    the notebook.)
    Well, I’m an actor and this play has
    cost me everything. So you can take
    your cowardly, malicious, shittily
    written reviews and shove them up
    your... (Showing her the wrinkled
    page.) ...wrinkly, tight ass.

    Riggan wears a proud smile. And suddenly, Tabitha begins to
    smile with him.

    TABITHA
    You think you’re an actor?
    (Calls to the waiter.)
    Eddie!
    Eddie the waiter approaches the table.

    WAITER
    Yeah, Mrs. Dickinson?

    TABITHA
    Give us some Shakespeare.

    WAITER
    No problem. Got anything in mind?

    Tabitha looks over at Riggan picking the perfect verse.

    TABITHA
    The Scottish Play. Act five...

    WAITER
    Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to
    day, To the last syllable of recorded
    time; And all our yesterdays have lighted
    fools. The way to dusty death...

    He is brilliant. The monologue is perfectly played and powerful.
    Riggan being mercilessly reminded of his mediocrity... by Eddie
    the waiter.

    WAITER (CONT'D)
    ...Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a
    walking shadow, a poor player, That
    struts and frets his hour upon the
    stage, And then is heard no more. It is
    (MORE)
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 94.
    WAITER (CONT'D)
    a tale told by an idiot, full of sound
    and fury... Signifying nothing.

    A few drunks clap at the beautiful performance. Then, a powerful
    silence rings out for a moment, until...

    TABITHA
    Thank you, Eddie.

    WAITER
    You got it.
    TABITHA
    (To Riggan. A derisive laugh.)
    You're no actor. You're a celebrity.
    Let's be clear on that.

    Tabitha rises from her seat and grabs her things.

    TABITHA (CONT’D)
    I'm going to kill your play.
    She walks away. Riggan sits numb. After a moment, he reaches
    over and gulps down Tabitha's entire martini, gin pouring out
    the sides of his mouth. Unaware, he slams the empty martini
    glass on top of the Carver napkin and gets up. We follow him
    out onto...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and the negative impact it has on the play. Riggan reveals a personal story about his abusive father, which shocks Mike. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and ends up running down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan's public humiliation continues as he is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths
    • Intense and emotionally charged dialogue
    • Powerful character interactions
    • Effective portrayal of public humiliation
    Weaknesses
    • Some dialogue may be overly dramatic

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with intense confrontations and a series of humiliating events for the protagonist. The dialogue is powerful and reveals deep emotions and personal struggles. The scene effectively builds tension and raises the stakes for the characters.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of the scene revolves around the consequences of inappropriate behavior, personal struggles, and the power dynamics between characters. It explores themes of abuse, self-reflection, and the impact of public perception.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene is crucial in advancing the story and character development. It reveals important information about Riggan's past and his motivations. The escalating confrontation and the subsequent public humiliation add tension and propel the narrative forward.

    Originality: 9

    The level of originality in this scene is high. The situation of a protagonist confronting a critic who has the power to destroy their work is a familiar one, but the dialogue and character dynamics in this scene bring a fresh and unique approach to the situation. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters in the scene are well-developed and their interactions are intense and emotionally charged. Riggan's revelation about his abusive father adds depth to his character, while Mike's inappropriate behavior and subsequent shock contribute to the conflict. Laura's actions further infuriate Riggan and add to the tension.

    Character Changes: 8

    The scene brings about some character changes, particularly in Riggan. His confrontation with Mike and the subsequent public humiliation make him question the consequences of his actions and reflect on his role as a father. These experiences contribute to his character development.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to convince Tabitha, the critic, to give his play a fair chance and not destroy it with a negative review. This goal reflects Riggan's deeper need for validation and recognition as an artist, as well as his fear of failure and being dismissed as a celebrity rather than a serious actor.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to prevent Tabitha from destroying his play with a negative review. This goal reflects the immediate challenge Riggan is facing in trying to protect his artistic work and reputation.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict in the scene is intense and multi-layered. It involves a physical fight, emotional confrontations, and a clash of ideologies. The conflict raises the stakes for the characters and drives the narrative forward.

    Opposition: 9

    The opposition in this scene is strong, as the protagonist is faced with a powerful critic who has the ability to destroy his play. The audience is unsure of how the conflict will unfold and whether the protagonist will be able to overcome the opposition.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes in the scene are high for Riggan. His reputation is at risk due to the negative impact of Mike's behavior and the public humiliation he experiences. The outcome of the confrontation with Tabitha and the future of his play are also at stake.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene significantly moves the story forward by introducing important conflicts, revealing character motivations, and raising the stakes. It sets up future confrontations and adds complexity to the narrative.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it subverts the audience's expectations by having the critic, Tabitha, initially appear as a formidable opponent to the protagonist, but then surprising the audience by engaging in a Shakespearean monologue with the waiter. This unexpected turn of events adds an element of unpredictability to the scene.

    Philosophical Conflict: 9

    The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the clash between Riggan's belief in the value of his own artistic work and Tabitha's belief that he is a celebrity rather than a true actor. This conflict challenges Riggan's values and worldview, as well as his belief in the importance of art and the role of critics.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene has a high emotional impact on the audience. It evokes strong emotions such as anger, frustration, and empathy. The intense confrontations and the protagonist's public humiliation elicit a powerful emotional response.

    Dialogue: 9

    The dialogue in the scene is powerful and impactful. It effectively conveys the emotions and motivations of the characters. The confrontation between Riggan and Tabitha is particularly intense and reveals their conflicting perspectives.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it presents a high-stakes conflict between the protagonist and the critic, with sharp and confrontational dialogue that keeps the audience invested in the outcome. The scene also explores themes of art, validation, and the role of critics, which can resonate with the audience.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by alternating between moments of tension and confrontation, and moments of reflection and introspection. This creates a rhythm that keeps the audience engaged and invested in the scene.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting to clearly convey the events and dialogue of the scene.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by character actions and dialogue that drive the conflict and resolution of the scene.


    Critique
    • The scene starts off with Riggan overhearing Sam and Mike flirting and laughing in Mike's room. This interaction doesn't seem to have much relevance to the overall plot or conflict of the story. It could be removed or replaced with a more meaningful interaction.
    • The transition from the hallway to the bar feels abrupt and could be smoother. It would be helpful to have a clearer indication of the passage of time and how Riggan ended up at the bar.
    • The conversation between Riggan and Tabitha is filled with tension and conflict, which is engaging. However, some of the dialogue feels a bit heavy-handed and could benefit from more subtlety and nuance.
    • The monologue performed by Eddie the waiter is a powerful moment, but it feels slightly out of place and disconnected from the rest of the scene. It could be integrated more seamlessly into the conversation between Riggan and Tabitha.
    • The ending of the scene, with Riggan drinking Tabitha's martini and leaving the bar, feels a bit anticlimactic. It would be more impactful if there was a stronger resolution or a clearer indication of Riggan's emotional state.
    • Overall, the scene effectively conveys the chaotic and tense emotional tone, and the conflict between Riggan and his insecurities. However, there are some elements that could be refined to enhance the scene's impact and cohesiveness.
    Suggestions
    • Consider replacing the interaction between Sam and Mike with a scene that directly relates to Riggan's doubts and insecurities.
    • Add a smoother transition between the hallway and the bar to clarify how Riggan ended up there.
    • Refine the dialogue between Riggan and Tabitha to add more subtlety and nuance, while still maintaining the tension and conflict.
    • Integrate Eddie's monologue more seamlessly into the conversation between Riggan and Tabitha to create a stronger connection between the two.
    • Revise the ending of the scene to provide a stronger resolution or a clearer indication of Riggan's emotional state.
    • Continue to highlight the chaotic and tense emotional tone, and the conflict between Riggan and his insecurities, while refining the scene for greater impact and cohesiveness.



    Scene 31 -  Riggan's Breaking Point
    49 EXT. STREET - CONTINUOUS 49

    ...the street, where he walks through the theater district.
    Tired. Drunk. Empty. Neon lights all around him. A crazy, old
    homeless man passes by in the opposite direction shouting
    furiously. Riggan keeps walking until he arrives at a bench,
    with a tree behind. Everything is quiet. Riggan sits on the
    bench, lost. We begin to tilt up, slowly, toward a tall tree.
    We move closer into the branches and the green leaves.
    Silence.

    A49 A49
    Night turns into day. The sounds of the city disappear and
    birds begin to sing. The branches now caressed by golden shafts
    of morning sun. Finally, we tilt down slowly and find...


    50 EXT. STREET - DAY. 50

    ...Riggan still sleeping on the bench. He looks like a bum. His
    raincoat is dirty and wet.



    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 95.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    God. You look like shit, brother. You
    get that mongoloid look when you're hung
    over, don't you?

    Riggan opens an eye. He scratches his hair.

    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    Let's go. Get up. It's a beautiful day.

    Riggan sits up slowly. He is really hung over.
    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    Stand up! Forget about the times. Everyone
    else has. So you're not a great actor...
    Who cares?!! You're much more than that.
    Fuck! You tower over all these theater
    douchebags. You're a movie star! A Global
    force! Don't you get it?

    Riggan stands up and begins to stumble forward. We pan around
    to find Birdman (a stronger Riggan wearing a cool Birdman
    outfit), following behind him.

    BIRDMAN
    You spent your whole life building a
    reputation and a bank account, and now
    they're both blown. So what? Fuck it. We
    make a come back. Something huge. Take what
    belongs to us. Take back the spotlight.
    Magazine covers and billboards. Happy meals
    with Birdman dolls. Remember that? That’s
    who you are. That’s who we are!

    Riggan just marches on. People and cars pass by, but nobody
    notices Birdman. Riggan tries to ignore him.

    BIRDMAN (CONT'D)
    C'mon, buddy. Tell me we're going back
    to the big leagues. Let’s do this.
    Shave off that pathetic goatee, and put
    the mask back on! Batman my balls.
    We’ll start a new franchise. Birdman:
    Phoenix Rising. Trust me! A billion
    world wide. Swear to God.

    A50 A50

    Riggan keeps walking. Birdman, insistent, chases, until
    suddenly he begins to flutter off the ground.

    BIRDMAN
    Do you hear me? You can do anything! You’re
    an icon!
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 96.

    Desperate, Birdman flies a bit higher around him.

    BIRDMAN (CONT'D)
    You’re bigger than life. You save people
    from their boring, miserable lives...

    The camera pans to the street in front of them. People carry
    out their everyday routines. There is a deli, a souvenir shop,
    a small bank...

    BIRDMAN (O.S.) (CONT'D)
    ...You make them jump, laugh, cry,
    shit their pants... All you have to do
    is snap your fingers and...

    B50 B50
    Riggan snaps his fingers, once, twice, and the bank suddenly
    explodes. The sound is so loud that it seems to belong to
    another movie. The earth shakes. People run. Dust all over.
    Fire. An unsteady camera pans back to Birdman.

    BIRDMAN
    (Excited.)
    That's what I'm talking about! That is
    cool! Explosive! Big, fast, loud!
    (He turns directly to the camera
    and talks about the audience.)
    Look at them. They love that shit!
    They starve for blood and action,
    not this artsy-fartsy-philosophical
    bullshit!

    C50 C50
    We hear a loud roar, and the camera pans to discover a huge
    alien about to crash a cab against the asphalt. Birdman uses his
    powerful blow to send the alien flying away.

    BIRDMAN
    And when you shout "whooaa!"...
    (Riggan shouts "Whooaa!")
    ...it explodes in the eardrum of
    millions. Your power is unlimited.

    Riggan slows down his pace, as he starts to listen.

    BIRDMAN (CONT'D)
    You glimmered on 3000 screens, over 5
    continents, in 47 countries at the
    same time. You are ubiquitous. You're
    a God! You can do it again. You can
    soar above all of them.
    10/29/14 / 97.

    D50 D50

    Riggan suddenly begins to levitate.

    BIRDMAN
    There you go, you mother fucker! See?
    Gravity doesn't even apply to you.

    The camera flies up with Riggan as he floats above the street.
    There is something magical in his ascension, gently impelled by
    the breeze. A beautiful backlight makes his body glow. Birdman
    flutters around him.
    BIRDMAN (CONT'D)
    Listen to me. We gotta go back! We have to
    do this. We have to end it on our terms.
    With a grand gesture.

    A strange light suddenly palpitates in Riggan's eyes. Something
    makes sense in what Birdman is telling him.

    The camera becomes Riggan's POV. He looks down to see the
    people on the street, watching him in awe.
    BIRDMAN (O.S.) (CONT'D)
    We’ll go back. We’ll show them how much
    they're going to miss us. Flames. Icarus.
    Sacrifice...

    We tilt up again to Riggan's face. He has a plan.

    BIRDMAN (O.S.) (CONT'D)
    Let’s go back one more time and show them
    what we’re capable of. You can do it.
    You're Birdman. Do you hear me? You're...

    A GUY'S VOICE (O.S.)
    Birdman!

    E50 E50

    And as the camera pulls away, we discover Birdman is gone and
    Riggan is standing on the ledge of a tall building. The camera
    tilts down and we see that more people have gathered around,
    and more cars has stopped, and they all point at Riggan,
    worried about the situation.

    A guy wearing shorts, a Bob Marley t-shirt and a robe opens his
    window, one floor below Riggan, and looks up at him.

    GUY
    Dude, what are you doing?

    Riggan looks down at the people on the street far below.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 98.

    GUY (CONT'D)
    You okay, buddy? Do you want me to
    call someone?

    We pan to a lady on her balcony filming Riggan with her phone.

    LADY
    Is this for real, or you're shooting a
    film?

    RIGGAN
    A film.

    The lady looks around but sees nothing.

    LADY
    Oh, you people are full of shit.

    She goes into her apartment.

    GUY
    I’m calling 911.

    The guy goes inside his apartment.

    RIGGAN
    One more time...

    Now, from the door of the rooftop, a good neighbor calmly
    approaches Riggan.

    GOOD NEIGHBOR
    Hi, sir. Can I help you? You should be
    careful.

    RIGGAN
    Sorry. Can’t talk. I'm late.
    (Murmuring.)
    Music.

    Some underscoring music begins to sound. The neighbor is now
    close to him and helps Riggan step down from the edge on to the
    floor of the rooftop.

    GOOD NEIGHBOR
    Are you alright? Do you want me to
    call someone? Do you know where to go?

    Riggan closes his eyes for a moment as the camera moves slowly
    toward him. He opens his eyes. The music begins to swell. Riggan
    stands up straight and proud, and in a voice that sounds like
    Birdman...

    RIGGAN
    Yes. I know where to go.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 99.

    He turns and begins to run on the rooftop. The music is rousing.
    As he runs, he holds out his arms, spreading them wide. The
    camera runs behind him, until suddenly...


    F50 F50
    Riggan jumps, and the camera jumps after him. He rapidly
    falls toward the street, toward the asphalt. But in his face
    there is no fear. No. He spreads his arms again and...


    G50 G50

    He takes flight, soaring high over Manhattan. The music becomes
    epic. There is something beautiful about this broken man flying
    like a superhero. We fly next to him, and we can see below the
    spectacular sight that is Manhattan, until...
    Genres: ["Drama","Comedy"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and reveals a personal story about his abusive father. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and ends up running down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan's public humiliation continues as he is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths "The scene effectively conveys Riggan's emotional turmoil and the escalating conflicts, creating a highly impactful and intense sequence."
    Weaknesses "Some viewers may find the scene's intense and emotional nature overwhelming."

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and intense, effectively conveying Riggan's emotional state and the challenges he faces.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of Riggan's struggle with his past and the consequences of his actions is compelling and well-executed.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene is engaging and propels the story forward, showcasing the escalating conflicts and challenges faced by Riggan.

    Originality: 9

    This scene has a level of originality in its blend of realism and fantasy, as well as its exploration of existential themes. The actions and dialogue of the characters feel authentic and true to their motivations and desires.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters are well-developed and their interactions drive the emotional intensity of the scene.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant emotional change as he questions the consequences of his actions and reflects on his role as a father.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to find purpose and meaning in his life. He is struggling with his identity as an actor and is seeking validation and a sense of self-worth.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to escape his current situation and find success and recognition in his career.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates into a physical fight, adding to the intensity of the scene.

    Opposition: 7

    The opposition in this scene is not particularly strong, as the protagonist's internal struggle is the main source of conflict. However, there is a sense of opposition between the protagonist's desire for artistic integrity and the pressure to conform to commercial success.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high as Riggan's reputation and the success of the play are at risk.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by showcasing the consequences of Riggan's actions and setting up a confrontation between Riggan and Ralph.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it blends realism and fantasy, creating unexpected moments and shifting the audience's expectations.

    Philosophical Conflict: 9

    The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the protagonist's struggle between artistic integrity and commercial success. He is torn between wanting to be a respected actor and wanting to be a movie star.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions, ranging from shock and anger to stress and humiliation.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue effectively conveys the emotions and conflicts between the characters.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it presents a visually striking and emotionally charged moment in the protagonist's journey. The dialogue and actions of the characters create tension and intrigue, keeping the audience invested in the story.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of this scene is effective in building tension and suspense. It starts slow and gradually increases in intensity as the protagonist's internal and external goals become clearer.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, introduces the protagonist's internal and external goals, and progresses through dialogue and action.


    Critique
    • The transition from the previous scene to this one is abrupt and may confuse the audience. Consider adding a smoother transition or a brief establishing shot to indicate the change in location.
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Birdman is repetitive and could be condensed to make it more impactful.
    • The hallucination sequence is visually interesting, but it may be difficult for the audience to understand what is happening. Consider adding more visual cues or context to make it clearer.
    • The scene ends on a cliffhanger with Riggan standing on the ledge of a building, but it is unclear what his intentions are. Consider adding more clarity to his motivations and the resolution of this situation.
    Suggestions
    • Consider adding a transition shot or line of dialogue to indicate the change in location from the previous scene.
    • Condense the dialogue between Riggan and Birdman to make it more impactful.
    • Add more visual cues or context to the hallucination sequence to make it clearer for the audience.
    • Provide more clarity on Riggan's intentions and the resolution of the cliffhanger ending.



    Scene 32 -  Confrontation and Humiliation
    51 EXT. THEATER - CONTINUOUS 51
    ...he finally lands on 45th street and calmly approaches the
    theater. An Usher acknowledges him with a look of surprise.

    USHER
    Mr. Thomson. I think you forgot to--

    RIGGAN
    Stop the music.

    The music stops.
    USHER
    I beg your pardon?

    Riggan enters the theater.

    The confused Usher watches him go by, as he points to the
    street. We pan to see a taxi driver coming out of his car,
    running like a mad man toward us.

    We stay with the Usher and the taxi driver as they argue. They
    take it inside the lobby, but we remain out front.

    A51 A51

    Day turns to night, igniting the lights of the marquee, which
    reflect off of the lobby doors. We hear wild applause coming
    from inside the theater. Seconds later, the doors of the
    theater open and the audience files out for intermission.



    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 100.

    MAN
    (Tweeting on his phone.)
    It's really good.

    WOMAN
    I know. I can’t believe it...

    We begin to move up, outside the theater. We see the marquee of
    the play that reads, "What We Talk When We Talk About Love".
    Above the title, in smaller print, "Riggan Thomson and Mike
    Shiner". Below on a banner, "Opening Night".
    We keep climbing until we arrive at Riggan's dressing room
    window. We push in to find...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and reveals a personal story about his abusive father. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and ends up running down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan's public humiliation continues as he is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths
    • Intense emotional impact
    • Effective portrayal of consequences
    • Strong character development
    Weaknesses
    • Limited exploration of theme

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and intense, with a strong emotional and confrontational tone. It effectively portrays the consequences of Riggan's actions and highlights the escalating conflict.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of the scene, which revolves around the confrontation and humiliation of Riggan, is well-executed and engaging.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene is gripping and moves the story forward significantly. It showcases the consequences of Riggan's actions and sets up further conflicts.

    Originality: 4

    The level of originality in this scene is relatively low. The situations and actions are familiar, such as a protagonist entering a theater during intermission. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue is realistic but not particularly unique.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters in the scene, particularly Riggan and Mike, are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant change in his emotional state and perspective as a result of the confrontation and humiliation he faces in the scene.

    Internal Goal: 7

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is not explicitly stated, but it can be inferred that Riggan Thomson wants to escape from the chaos and stress of the theater and find a moment of peace.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to enter the theater and continue with the play's intermission.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 10

    The level of conflict in the scene is extremely high, with both verbal and physical confrontations between the characters.

    Opposition: 7

    The opposition in this scene is moderate. The confusion between the usher and the taxi driver creates a small obstacle for the protagonist, but it is not a significant challenge.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes in the scene are high, as Riggan's reputation and personal relationships are at risk due to his actions and the public humiliation he faces.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward significantly, showcasing the consequences of Riggan's actions and setting up further conflicts and confrontations.

    Unpredictability: 5

    This scene is somewhat unpredictable because it introduces a taxi driver running towards the theater, creating a sense of mystery and potential conflict.

    Philosophical Conflict: 0

    There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene has a strong emotional impact, evoking shock, anger, and empathy for Riggan's humiliation and frustration.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue in the scene is intense and impactful, effectively conveying the emotions and conflicts between the characters.

    Engagement: 8

    This scene is engaging because it captures the audience's excitement and anticipation for the play, as well as the protagonist's desire for peace amidst the chaos.

    Pacing: 9

    The pacing of the scene is effective in creating a sense of urgency and anticipation. The quick progression of actions and events keeps the audience engaged.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It includes scene headings, character names, dialogue, and narrative description.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with an exterior shot, introduces the protagonist's goal, and progresses with a series of actions and events.


    Critique
    • The scene feels disconnected from the previous scene and the following scene. It doesn't add much to the overall story or character development.
    • The dialogue is minimal and doesn't reveal much about the characters or their relationships.
    • The visual elements are limited to the marquee and the theater exterior, which are not particularly interesting or significant.
    • The emotional tone is neutral and doesn't create any tension or conflict.
    • The conflict between Riggan and the usher is resolved quickly and without any consequence.
    • The scene lacks purpose and could be cut without affecting the story or character arcs.
    Suggestions
    • Consider combining this scene with the previous or following scene to create a more cohesive sequence.
    • Add more dialogue or actions that reveal character traits or relationships.
    • Include more significant visual elements that add to the story or create a mood.
    • Create more conflict or tension in the scene to make it more engaging.
    • Consider cutting this scene altogether if it doesn't serve a clear purpose in the story.



    Scene 33 -  Confrontation and Reflection
    52 INT. RIGGAN'S DRESSING ROOM - THEATER - EVENING 52
    ... that the room is full of roses and cards. Riggan lies on
    the sofa, hugging a cushion. He is wearing the long wig and
    mustache for the motel scene.

    Sylvia appears in the doorway.

    SYLVIA
    Wow, that is just NASCAR hot.

    He smiles at her.
    SYLVIA (CONT'D)
    I just wanted to come say hello. It's going
    great out there. You're so good. I mean it.
    You’re-- I really mean it.

    RIGGAN
    Come here. Sit next to me.

    ANNIE ON SPEAKERS
    This is your five minutes.
    SYLVIA
    Do you need to--?

    RIGGAN
    I'm fine. Sit.

    She does.

    SYLVIA
    Look at all these roses.

    SYLVIA (CONT’D) RIGGAN
    You hate roses... I hate roses...

    She laughs. He watches her, something odd in his expression.
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 101.

    SYLVIA (CONT’D)
    Are you okay? You seem-- I don’t know, you
    seem abnormally calm.

    RIGGAN
    I am calm. I’m great. I spent most of
    the day observing how beautifully this
    pile of dirty clothes was lit by the
    warm afternoon sun. (A tiny smile.) So
    beautiful.
    Sylvia, teasing him, closes her eyes and imitates Riggan's
    meditation posture.

    SYLVIA
    (Mocking him.)
    Oh yes. God is those purplish light
    dots I see between my eyes and my
    eyelids.

    RIGGAN
    You know? I have this voice that talks to
    me and tells me the truth. It’s comforting,
    and scary.

    A beat.

    SYLVIA
    I’m going to pretend I didn’t hear you say
    that.

    RIGGAN
    Okay.

    SYLVIA
    (Changing the subject.)
    You wouldn't believe the crowd outside.
    They said, some people paid up to 500
    dollars a ticket.

    He sits down.
    RIGGAN
    You wanna hear something funny?

    SYLVIA
    Sure.

    RIGGAN
    Do you remember our last anniversary party?

    SYLVIA
    Seriously? You're going to ruin a nice
    moment with that?

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 102.

    RIGGAN
    Do you remember the party?

    SYLVIA
    The party where you fucked Janet Rossbach
    in our bed? Yeah, it rings a bell.

    RIGGAN
    Yeah, well. Let's skip over that part
    for a minute.
    SYLVIA
    Gladly.

    RIGGAN
    After you threw the guests out of the
    house, and the furniture out of the
    window. You locked yourself in the
    bathroom.

    SYLVIA
    I remember. Why are we--

    RIGGAN
    I drove down to Malibu. I sat on the beach
    for a while. Just... staring out at the
    ocean.

    SYLVIA
    Riggan...

    RIGGAN
    Until I walked straight into the water
    and tried to drown myself.

    Silence. Sylvia stares at Riggan, surprised.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    I was in up to my chest when I felt the
    first one. On my back, like somebody was
    holding a frying pan against me. And then
    my chest, and my legs. The water was full
    of jellyfish. I fought my way out of the
    water, and I started rolling around the
    sand like a maniac... crying.

    Sylvia doesn't know how to react.

    SYLVIA
    You said it was a sunburn.

    RIGGAN
    (Smiling.)
    And you believed me.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 103.

    SYLVIA
    To be honest, I didn't give a shit.

    RIGGAN
    I love you. And I love Sam.

    SYLVIA
    I know.

    Silence. They stare at each other.
    RIGGAN
    I never should have video taped Sam's
    birth. First of all because you and Sam
    both look like shit in that video. But
    mostly because I missed the moment. I
    should have just been there with the two
    of you. Present in my own life. So I’d
    have it. But, I don’t. I don’t have any of
    it.
    SYLVIA
    You have Sam.

    RIGGAN
    No, I don't.

    SYLVIA
    Listen, she's just--

    RIGGAN
    No, I understand. She needed a father
    and she got one shamefully successful
    youtube video. Pretty pathetic.

    SYLVIA
    (Putting a finger on
    Riggan’s lips.)
    Shhh... There are more pathetic things
    than that. That mustache, for example.
    She kisses him.

    ANNIE ON SPEAKERS
    Places for act two. Places.

    SYLVIA
    Riggan...

    RIGGAN
    You should get back to your seat. You
    don't want to miss what's next.

    Sylvia lingers for a moment, and not knowing what to say, she
    exits. Riggan opens a drawer and takes out a black case. He
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 104.

    gently opens the lid. Inside a revolver. He takes some bullets
    out of a box and one by one loads them into the chamber as he
    does his vocal exercises into the mirror.

    RIGGAN (CONT'D)
    Twenty little leopards laughed at two
    lofty lions. Twenty little leopards
    laughed at two lofty lions. Twenty
    little leopards... laughed.

    He stares at the dressing room door, and with his telekinetic
    powers he opens it. He snaps the cylinder into the gun and
    exits out into...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and reveals a personal story about his abusive father. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and ends up running down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan's public humiliation continues as he is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths "The scene effectively explores the emotional turmoil of the protagonist and highlights the theme of fatherhood. The performances are strong and the conflict is intense."
    Weaknesses "Some viewers may find the scene's intense emotional content overwhelming. The pacing could also be improved in certain moments."

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with strong performances and intense conflict. It effectively explores the inner struggles of the protagonist and sets up a compelling confrontation.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting one's past and dealing with the consequences of one's actions is well-executed in this scene. It adds depth to the character and drives the plot forward.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene is engaging and keeps the audience invested in the story. It introduces new conflicts and challenges for the protagonist.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the setting and themes are not particularly unique, the dialogue and character interactions bring a fresh and authentic perspective to familiar situations.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed. The audience can empathize with their struggles and conflicts.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant emotional change in this scene as he confronts his past and reflects on his role as a father. It adds depth to his character arc.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to find peace and acceptance within himself. He is reflecting on his past mistakes and regrets, and trying to come to terms with them.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to prepare for the next act of the performance. He is getting ready to go back on stage.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict in the scene is intense and escalates from a verbal confrontation to a physical fight. It adds tension and keeps the audience engaged.

    Opposition: 7

    The opposition in this scene is strong, as the protagonist is facing internal conflicts and struggles with his past actions and regrets. The audience is unsure of how he will resolve these conflicts.

    High Stakes: 8

    The stakes are high in this scene as Riggan's personal and professional life are at risk. His actions and decisions have significant consequences.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by introducing new conflicts and challenges for the protagonist. It sets up a confrontation between Riggan and Ralph, adding to the overall plot.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it includes unexpected revelations and shifts in tone. The protagonist's confession about his past actions and his contemplation of suicide are unexpected and add tension to the scene.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene. The protagonist is grappling with the idea of finding meaning and purpose in his life, and questioning the choices he has made.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions in the audience, particularly sadness, regret, and frustration. It explores deep emotional wounds and the consequences of past actions.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue is impactful and reveals important information about the characters and their relationships. It effectively conveys the emotions and conflicts in the scene.

    Engagement: 8

    This scene is engaging because it combines humor, emotion, and suspense. The dialogue and character interactions keep the audience interested and invested in the story.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by allowing for moments of reflection and introspection, as well as moments of tension and suspense. The rhythm of the dialogue and the pauses between lines create a sense of anticipation and build-up.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It is properly formatted with scene headings, character names, and dialogue.

    Structure: 9

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by dialogue and character actions.


    Critique
    • The dialogue between Riggan and Sylvia feels natural and reveals their playful and intimate dynamic.
    • The revelation of Riggan's past suicide attempt is a powerful moment, but it could be given more emotional weight and exploration.
    • The transition from Riggan's confession to Sylvia's reassurance feels abrupt and could benefit from more development.
    • The introduction of the revolver and Riggan's vocal exercises feels disconnected from the rest of the scene and lacks clear motivation.
    • The use of telekinetic powers to open the dressing room door feels out of place and introduces a fantastical element that may not align with the overall tone of the screenplay.
    Suggestions
    • Consider expanding on Riggan's past suicide attempt to delve deeper into his emotional struggles and the impact it has had on his life.
    • Develop the conversation between Riggan and Sylvia after his confession to further explore their relationship and provide more emotional support.
    • Reconsider the inclusion of the revolver and vocal exercises, as they may distract from the main focus of the scene and the overall story.
    • Find a more grounded and thematically consistent way to convey Riggan's internal struggles and conflicts without relying on telekinetic powers.



    Scene 34 -  Confrontation and Revelation
    53 INT. HALLWAY - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 53

    ...the hallway. He paces deliberately, gun in hand.

    A technician goes by in the opposite direction.

    TECHNICIAN
    Break a leg, Mr. Thomson.

    Riggan ignores him and continues through to the...

    54 INT. BACKSTAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 54

    ...backstage area. Annie immediately hustles over to him holding
    up the brain mechanism. He walks right by her.

    RIGGAN
    (Brushing her off.)
    I don't need it.

    Annie doesn't seem to understand. She stays there, holding the
    device. Riggan takes his place outside the motel door. We pan
    toward the audience. The auditorium is full. The audience in
    complete silence.


    Riggan knocks firmly on the door. Silence again. Then...

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Terri! Terri!
    (Beat.)
    I know you're in there!
    He barges through the door and onto...
    10/29/14 / 105.

    55 INT. STAGE - THEATER - CONTINUOUS 55

    ...the stage. The motel room as we saw it before. Mike and
    Lesley jump out of the bed.

    LESLEY
    Ed! What are you doing here?

    RIGGAN
    (Almost whispering.)
    Why? I need you to tell me why. I lived for
    you-- I worshipped you...
    MIKE
    Listen Ed, I know this is hard but--

    Riggan raises one hand to silence Mike. Mike looks at him,
    confused. His eyes narrow on the gun. There is no red plug.

    Dead silence. An eerie electricity in the theater.

    RIGGAN
    What's wrong with me? Why do I end
    up having to beg people to love me?

    LESLEY
    Ed. Eddie. Please... Give me the gun.

    She begins to cry.

    LESLEY (CONT'D)
    Just look at me. I was drowning. I
    was not capable of-- You deserve to
    be loved. You do.

    RIGGAN
    I just wanted to be what you wanted.
    (Beat.)
    Now I spend every fucking minute
    praying to be someone else. Someone
    I'm not. Anyone...

    MIKE
    Put down the gun, Ed. She just doesn't love
    you anymore.

    RIGGAN
    (To Lesley.)
    You don't, do you?

    LESLEY
    (With sympathy.)
    No...


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 106.

    RIGGAN
    And you never will...

    LESLEY
    I'm sorry.

    For the first time, Riggan turns to face the audience. He
    smiles the most beautiful insane smile.

    RIGGAN
    I don't exist. I'm not even here. I don't
    exist. None of this matters.

    Then he raises a trembling arm, and with his eyes full of
    tears, he aims the gun at Mike.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Pum.

    But he doesn’t shoot. Then he turns and aims at Tabitha
    Dickinson who is sitting on the second row.
    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    Pum.

    Again, no shot. Slowly, Riggan raises the gun toward his own
    head, suddenly a frightening explosion. Blood sprays. Riggan
    falls. We stay with the shell-shocked audience. A moment of
    tension, of uncertainty, until...

    MAN
    Bravo!

    The audience, one by one, jump to their feet, applauding
    wildly. The sole exception is Tabitha, who remains seated, a
    dazed expression on her face. We stay with the audience a few
    seconds longer.

    FADE TO BLACK.

    The sounds slowly vanish. After a moment of silence...
    BIRDMAN (V.O.)
    You won't be hearing from him
    anymore.

    MAN (V.O.)
    Is he...?

    BIRDMAN (V.O)
    He's gone.
    10/29/14 / 107.

    INT. WAITING ROOM - HOSPITAL - DAWN

    One of the old Birdman films is playing on a small television
    screen that hangs on a corner. The scene ends and a Morning
    Show host appears. Behind him a picture of Riggan and a
    caption that reads: “Nation in shock.” A shot of a candle
    vigil in Central park.

    HOST
    What do we talk about when we talk
    about Riggan Thomson? When we come
    back, more on the actor who two
    nights ago shot himself during the
    opening performance of his new
    Broadway play...

    We pan away from the TV to see that the waiting room is
    filled with newsmen waiting for something to happen. There is
    almost no room to breath.

    We pan to see Jake emerging from an elevator, carrying a
    newspaper under his arm. He walks through the dense mass of
    newsmen with a serious expression on his face. We follow him
    into...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary In this scene, Riggan confronts Mike about his inappropriate behavior and reveals a personal story about his abusive father. The confrontation escalates into a physical fight, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Meanwhile, Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and ends up running down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan's public humiliation continues as he is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths
    • Intense performances
    • Emotional depth
    • Powerful dialogue
    • Effective character development
    Weaknesses
    • None identified

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene is highly impactful and emotionally charged, with intense performances and a dramatic climax. It effectively conveys the internal struggles and external pressures faced by the protagonist.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of confronting personal demons and facing the consequences of one's actions is well-executed in this scene. It adds depth to the overall story and explores complex themes.

    Plot: 9

    The plot of the scene is engaging and propels the story forward. It introduces conflicts and challenges for the protagonist, leading to significant character development.

    Originality: 7

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the setting of a theater and the themes of identity and self-worth are not entirely unique, the specific circumstances and dialogue in this scene offer a fresh approach to these familiar elements. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality of the scene.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters in the scene are well-developed and their emotions and motivations are effectively portrayed. The performances enhance the impact of the scene.

    Character Changes: 9

    Riggan undergoes a significant character change in this scene, questioning his actions and facing the consequences of his behavior. The confrontation and public humiliation lead to a transformation in his mindset.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to understand why he is not loved and why he feels the need to be someone else. This reflects his deeper need for validation and acceptance, as well as his fear of being unlovable.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to confront Terri and find out why she has left him. This reflects the immediate challenge he is facing in his personal life and relationships.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict in the scene is intense and multi-layered, involving both physical and emotional confrontations. It creates tension and drives the narrative forward.

    Opposition: 8

    The opposition in this scene is strong, as the protagonist faces resistance and conflicting viewpoints from the other characters. The audience is unsure of how the conflicts will be resolved and what choices the characters will make.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes in the scene are high, as Riggan's reputation, relationships, and mental well-being are at risk. The consequences of his actions have significant implications for his career and personal life.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by introducing conflicts, deepening character development, and setting up future confrontations. It adds momentum to the narrative.

    Unpredictability: 8

    This scene is unpredictable because it presents unexpected twists and turns in the protagonist's actions and dialogue. The audience is unsure of how the scene will unfold and what choices the characters will make.

    Philosophical Conflict: 9

    The philosophical conflict evident in this scene is the protagonist's struggle with his own identity and the need for external validation. This challenges his beliefs and values about self-worth and the nature of love.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions in the audience, ranging from sadness and anger to shock and empathy. The performances and the dramatic climax contribute to its high emotional impact.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue is powerful and reveals important information about the characters' pasts and motivations. It effectively conveys the emotional intensity of the scene.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it builds tension and suspense through the protagonist's internal and external conflicts. The emotional dialogue and dramatic actions of the characters keep the audience invested in the outcome of the scene.

    Pacing: 9

    The pacing of the scene contributes to its effectiveness by gradually building tension and suspense. The rhythm of the dialogue and the progression of the actions keep the audience engaged and invested in the outcome.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting to clearly convey the visual and auditory elements of the scene.

    Structure: 9

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a clear location and action, progresses through dialogue and character interactions, and ends with a dramatic climax and resolution.


    Critique
    • The scene is emotionally charged and intense, but some of the dialogue feels forced and unnatural.
    • The motivations behind Riggan's actions are not fully clear and could benefit from more development.
    • The use of a gun as a plot device feels cliche and could be replaced with a more nuanced conflict.
    • The scene could benefit from more visual elements to enhance the tension and drama.
    • The news coverage at the end feels abrupt and disconnected from the rest of the scene.
    • The scene could benefit from more exploration of the relationships between the characters and their dynamics.
    Suggestions
    • Consider reworking the dialogue to make it more natural and nuanced.
    • Develop Riggan's motivations and backstory more fully to make his actions more understandable.
    • Explore alternative conflicts that could replace the use of a gun.
    • Incorporate more visual elements such as lighting and staging to enhance the tension and drama.
    • Consider integrating the news coverage more seamlessly into the scene.
    • Spend more time developing the relationships between the characters to make their interactions more impactful.



    Scene 35 -  The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance
    INT. ROOM - HOSPITAL - CONTINUOUS

    ...a room. Jake peers in. Riggan lies on a bed, the bandages
    on his nose cover most of his face. Sylvia is looking out the
    window.

    JAKE
    Is he...?

    SYLVIA
    He’s awake.

    Jake enters the room.

    JAKE
    (Serious.)
    I thought I lost you, buddy. Thank
    god you’re a horrible shot! What
    the hell happened? I was watching
    you up on that stage, and all of a
    sudden you get that goofy look in
    your eye, and you were just like--

    He starts to laugh.

    SYLVIA
    What the hell are you laughing
    about? He tried to-- What is wrong
    with you?
    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 108.

    JAKE
    I’m happy, okay? He’s alive. My
    best friend is alive. And he is the
    man of the hour!

    Jake holds the New York Times up in the air.

    RIGGAN
    What is that?

    JAKE
    You did it.

    SYLVIA
    (Coming to them.)
    You have to be shitting me... She
    wrote a review?

    Jake unfolds the newspaper and we see the headline of the
    review: “The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance”.
    JAKE
    (To Sylvia.)
    Read it.

    He hands her the newspaper. She begins to read to herself.

    SYLVIA
    I don’t believe this...

    JAKE
    Read it out loud!

    SAM
    "Thompson has unwittingly given
    birth to a new form that can only
    be described as supra-realism.
    Blood was spilled both literally
    and metaphorically by artist and
    audience alike. Red blood. The
    blood that has been sorely missing
    from the veins of the American
    theatre..."
    (Beat. To a smiling Jake.)
    You’re happy about this?

    She hands it to Riggan.

    JAKE
    Happy? I’m fucking euphoric. This
    is the-- This is the kind of review
    that turns someone into a living
    legend.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 109.

    SYLVIA
    He tried to-- He shot the nose off
    his face!

    JAKE
    He’s got a new nose! And if he
    doesn’t like that one, we’ll get
    him another one. We can use Meg
    Ryan’s guy. Who gives a shit? Turn
    on the tv. There are people praying
    for him all over the country.
    They’re lighting candles in Central
    Park. He did it. (To Riggan) You
    did it! The play’s gonna run
    forever. It’s gonna open in London,
    in Paris... The studios will call
    us again. We’ll get book offers.

    SYLVIA
    How do you know all that? You can
    see the future?
    JAKE
    (Euphoric.)
    Yes.

    She slaps him in the face.

    SYLVIA
    Did you see that coming? You’re so
    full of shit, Jake.

    Jake needs a few seconds to recover. Then he looks at Riggan
    who just sits there, in silence.

    JAKE
    Why aren’t you saying anything?
    This is what you wanted wasn’t it?
    (Riggan gazes at the
    review.)
    Riggan, this is what you wanted.
    RIGGAN
    It’s what I wanted.

    JAKE
    Okay, listen. You’re gonna get hit
    with a “brandishing a weapon”
    charge. If anybody talks to you, it
    was an accident and we’re doing an
    internal invest--

    A newsman comes into the room and takes a quick picture.


    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 110.

    JAKE (CONT’D)
    (Chasing him out.)
    This is a hospital you motherfucker!

    Jake rushes to the door, shoving the newsman and a few other
    paparazzi out the door. Security guards. Chaos. Finally
    silence. Sylvia steps up and looks Riggan in the eye.

    SYLVIA
    Is that what it was? An accident?
    Riggan just stares at her. His calm, sad eyes peeking through
    the bandages. After a moment his gaze moves over her
    shoulder. Sylvia turns and we discover Sam standing in the
    doorway holding a bouquet of flowers. A bit of awkward
    silence, and Sylvia decides to leave them alone.

    She kisses Sam on the head and exits. Sam walks the flowers
    to Riggan at the bed. She lays them on his chest.

    SAM
    Alchemillas.

    The hint of a smile on Riggan’s face.

    SAM (CONT’D)
    Are you actually smiling?
    (She smiles.)
    What’s so funny?

    RIGGAN
    I can’t smell them.

    A moment until the smiles turn to gentle laughter. She takes
    out her cell phone and snaps a picture of him.

    RIGGAN (CONT’D)
    What are you doing?

    SAM
    I’m posting this picture on your
    Twitter page.

    RIGGAN
    Very funny...

    SAM
    Set it up today.

    RIGGAN
    You’re joking.

    SAM
    I’m not.

    (CONTINUED)
    10/29/14 / 111.

    RIGGAN
    Let me see the picture.

    SAM
    Absolutely not. You look hideous.

    RIGGAN
    Thanks a lot.

    SAM
    I’m just kidding. No, I’m not. You
    look hideous.
    (Working on phone.)
    You already have 80 thousand
    followers. In less than a day. And
    I’m about to scare the shit out of
    them.

    RIGGAN
    Let me see.
    SAM
    No. Done.

    A moment between them. Sam picks up the flowers and kisses
    him tenderly on the head. Riggan is pleasantly surprised by
    that kiss.

    SAM (CONT’D)
    Now, I’m going to find something to
    put these flowers in.

    She heads out of the room. Riggan lies there for a moment,
    tranquil. After a moment he reaches up and touches his
    bandages. Finally, he climbs out of the bed. We follow him
    into...
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary After a physical fight with Mike, Riggan questions the consequences and finds himself locked out of the theater. He runs down the street in his underwear, attracting attention and encountering Ralph and his attorney. Riggan is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths "Strong emotional impact, effective portrayal of consequences and humiliation"
    Weaknesses "Some dialogue could be more impactful"

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene effectively portrays the emotional turmoil and humiliation experienced by Riggan, while also setting up a confrontation between him and Ralph.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of personal consequences and public humiliation is well-executed in this scene.

    Plot: 9

    The plot progresses significantly in this scene, with Riggan facing the consequences of his actions and experiencing public humiliation.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a protagonist dealing with the consequences of their actions is familiar, the specific circumstances and the characters' reactions add a fresh perspective. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and reactions are well-portrayed, particularly Riggan's internal struggle and Ralph's confrontational attitude.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant change in his perception of success and public validation.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to come to terms with the success of his play and the impact it has had on his life. It reflects his desire for validation and recognition as an artist.

    External Goal: 7

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is to deal with the consequences of his actions, specifically the charge of 'brandishing a weapon'. It reflects the immediate circumstances and challenges he is facing.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike, as well as the confrontation with Ralph, adds tension and drama to the scene.

    Opposition: 6

    The opposition in this scene is not particularly strong. While there are conflicts and challenges, they are quickly resolved or overshadowed by other events. The audience is not left in suspense or uncertainty.

    High Stakes: 8

    The stakes are high for Riggan, as his reputation and career are on the line.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by showing the consequences of Riggan's actions and setting up a confrontation with Ralph.

    Unpredictability: 7

    This scene is unpredictable because it introduces unexpected elements, such as the positive review and the protagonist's reaction to it. The audience is unsure of how the characters will react and what the consequences of their actions will be.

    Philosophical Conflict: 0

    There is no evident philosophical conflict in this scene.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 9

    The scene evokes strong emotions, particularly Riggan's humiliation and internal struggle.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue effectively conveys the characters' emotions and motivations.

    Engagement: 9

    This scene is engaging because it combines emotional moments with humor, creating a dynamic and relatable interaction between the characters. The dialogue and actions keep the audience invested in the scene.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of the scene is effective in building tension and emotion. It allows for moments of reflection and dialogue, while also maintaining a sense of urgency.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, character names, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a description of the setting, followed by character actions and dialogue, and ends with a clear resolution.


    Critique
    • The scene lacks a clear conflict or tension. While there is some initial tension between Jake and Sylvia regarding Riggan's actions, it quickly dissipates without any resolution.
    • The dialogue feels somewhat repetitive and could benefit from more subtext or depth.
    • The emotional tone of the scene is somewhat inconsistent. Jake is euphoric and celebratory, while Sylvia is still concerned and angry. Riggan remains mostly silent and calm.
    • The scene could benefit from more visual elements or actions to enhance the storytelling and engage the audience.
    • The ending of the scene feels abrupt and leaves the reader wanting more resolution or closure.
    Suggestions
    • Introduce a stronger conflict or tension between Jake and Sylvia that is resolved or addressed in some way.
    • Revise the dialogue to add more subtext and depth, exploring the characters' emotions and motivations.
    • Consider adding visual elements or actions that enhance the storytelling and create a more dynamic scene.
    • Provide a more satisfying ending to the scene that offers some resolution or closure.



    Scene 36 -  Breaking Point
    INT. BATHROOM - ROOM - HOSPITAL - CONTINUOUS

    ...the bathroom. He stands before the mirror. He stares at
    his reflection for a few seconds, and slowly begins to remove
    the bandages. We can see that Riggan’s nose has been
    reconstructed. It is a crooked, incomplete nose, like the one
    Javier Bardem has.

    RIGGAN
    I do look hideous.

    In the reflection, Riggan sees Birdman sitting on the toilet.
    They look at each other, but say nothing. Riggan puts the
    bandages back on and we follow him out to...
    10/29/14 / 112.

    INT. ROOM - HOSPITAL - CONTINUOUS

    ...the room. He looks around, but Sam is gone. He ambles over
    to the window, his ass hanging out of the back of his
    hospital robe. He opens the window and feels the sun and the
    breeze on his swollen face. We just hear the sounds of the
    people standing down in the parking lot. Media trucks. Fans.
    We stay with Riggan, who seems to be thinking about
    something. He sees a flock of birds dancing in the sky. Then
    he grabs the side of the window with one hand and begins to
    step up onto the sill.
    The camera pans away from him to a table that has some photos
    propped on it: One of he and Sam when she was a child. One
    with Sylvia and Sam. A copy of Carver’s “What we talk About
    When We Talk About Love” laying on the surface.

    The camera continues to pan until it comes to the door. Sam
    enters with a small vase. She looks around...

    SAM
    Dad?

    She goes to the bathroom and peers in... nothing.

    SAM (CONT’D)
    Dad...?

    She spots the opened window and registers the sounds from
    outside. Tentatively she walks toward the window. She gets
    there, summons her courage and looks down. Nothing. Slowly,
    confused, she tilts her head up and looks up into the sky. A
    smile, filled with pride, begin to wash over her face.

    SMASH TO BLACK *
    FOXSEARCHLIGHT.COM/AWARDS
    Released by Twentieth Century Fox © 2014 Twentieth Century Fox
    Genres: ["Drama"]

    Summary Riggan confronts Mike about his behavior and reveals a personal story about his abusive father. The confrontation turns physical, leaving Riggan questioning the consequences. Laura shows Riggan an article featuring Mike, further infuriating him. Riggan's frustration reaches a breaking point as he finds himself locked out of the theater and runs down the street in his underwear, attracting attention from tourists and fans. He is confronted by Ralph and his attorney, adding to his stress. Riggan is forced to sign autographs and take pictures while being insulted by onlookers. The scene ends with Riggan encountering Ralph in the theater lobby, setting up a confrontation between the two.
    Strengths
    • Intense confrontation
    • Emotional depth
    • Strong character development
    Weaknesses
    • Limited exploration of theme

    Ratings
    Overall

    Overall: 9

    The scene effectively builds tension and showcases the emotional turmoil of the protagonist. The intense confrontation and subsequent humiliation create a strong impact on the audience.


    Story Content

    Concept: 8

    The concept of exploring personal trauma and the consequences of one's actions is well-executed in this scene.

    Plot: 9

    The plot progresses significantly in this scene, with the confrontation and subsequent events leading to a turning point for the protagonist.

    Originality: 6

    The level of originality in this scene is moderate. While the situation of a character coming to terms with their changed appearance is not entirely unique, the specific details and visual imagery used to convey the protagonist's emotions and struggles add a fresh approach. The authenticity of the characters' actions and dialogue adds to the originality.


    Character Development

    Characters: 9

    The characters' emotions and conflicts are portrayed effectively, especially Riggan's internal struggle and the tension between him and Mike.

    Character Changes: 8

    Riggan experiences a significant change in his mindset and emotional state throughout the scene, questioning the consequences of his actions.

    Internal Goal: 8

    The protagonist's internal goal in this scene is to come to terms with his changed appearance and accept his own self-image. It reflects his deeper need for self-acceptance and his fear of being judged or rejected based on his physical appearance.

    External Goal: 6

    The protagonist's external goal in this scene is not explicitly stated, but it can be inferred that he is searching for his daughter, Sam. This goal reflects the immediate circumstance of his daughter being missing and his desire to find her and ensure her safety.


    Scene Elements

    Conflict Level: 9

    The conflict between Riggan and Mike escalates to a physical fight, and Riggan's subsequent encounters with Ralph and onlookers add to the conflict.

    Opposition: 7

    The opposition in this scene is strong as the protagonist faces both internal struggles with self-acceptance and external challenges, such as his daughter being missing. The audience is unsure of how these obstacles will be resolved.

    High Stakes: 9

    The stakes are high for Riggan as he faces public humiliation, confrontations, and the potential consequences of his actions.

    Story Forward: 9

    The scene moves the story forward by presenting a turning point for the protagonist and setting up a confrontation between Riggan and Ralph.

    Unpredictability: 6

    This scene is unpredictable because it introduces unexpected elements, such as the presence of Birdman in the reflection and the protagonist's daughter being missing. These elements create suspense and intrigue for the audience.

    Philosophical Conflict: 7

    There is a philosophical conflict evident in this scene between the protagonist's inner struggle with self-acceptance and the external pressures of societal beauty standards and expectations. This conflict challenges the protagonist's beliefs about his own worth and the importance of physical appearance.


    Audience Engagement

    Emotional Impact: 10

    The scene evokes strong emotions in the audience, particularly anger, frustration, and humiliation.

    Dialogue: 8

    The dialogue is impactful and reveals important information about the characters' past and motivations.

    Engagement: 7

    This scene is engaging because it presents a visually striking and emotionally charged moment for the protagonist. The audience is drawn into the protagonist's internal struggle and the mystery of his daughter's disappearance.

    Pacing: 8

    The pacing of this scene is effective in conveying the protagonist's introspection and building suspense. The slower moments, such as the protagonist staring at his reflection and the camera panning, create a sense of contemplation and anticipation.


    Technical Aspect

    Formatting: 9

    The formatting of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It uses proper scene headings, action lines, and dialogue formatting.

    Structure: 8

    The structure of this scene follows the expected format for its genre. It begins with a specific location and time, includes descriptive narrative description, and transitions smoothly between different locations within the hospital.


    Critique
    • The scene could benefit from more clarity on Riggan's motivations for wanting to jump out the window. Is it because of his physical appearance, his failed play, or something else entirely?
    • The interaction between Riggan and Birdman could be more developed. Is Birdman a figment of Riggan's imagination or a real entity? What is their relationship?
    • The scene could use more tension and conflict to heighten the stakes. Perhaps Sam could try to physically stop Riggan from jumping or try to reason with him more forcefully.
    • The emotional tone could be more consistent. Riggan's self-deprecating humor and Sam's smile at the end seem at odds with the gravity of the situation.
    • The scene could benefit from more visual cues to convey Riggan's mental state. For example, the flock of birds could be a metaphor for his desire to fly away from his problems.
    • The scene ends too abruptly and leaves too many questions unanswered. What happens next? Does Riggan jump or does Sam stop him?
    Suggestions
    • Clarify Riggan's motivations for wanting to jump and develop his relationship with Birdman.
    • Increase the tension and conflict between Riggan and Sam.
    • Maintain a consistent emotional tone throughout the scene.
    • Use more visual cues to convey Riggan's mental state.
    • Provide a more satisfying resolution to the scene.